To Disclose or Not to Disclose?

To Disclose or Not to Disclose?

What are some reasons you do not disclose your race or ethnicity? Have you ever felt better not responding to this information? Why or why not?  I know I have never felt like I should go back in an application and check the box as being Black or African American. There has been a certain level of gratification of going into an interview without this information being disclosed. I remember getting rejection letters and wait list letters from universities and often thought why when explanation was not given except for the high number of applicants. As a registered nurse with experience and higher than a B average in all undergraduate studies these questions often surfaced. Was I not selected due to information disclosed about my background? One starts to wonder when meeting exceeding the minimum qualifications.

There is a great feeling of being considered for employment or chosen for a nursing program by review of my accolades from my curriculum vitae without my race and ethnicity being accounted for. The question of demographic reporting was brought up in a meeting last week. The question was asked about why some students do not check this box when applying to nursing programs. Is this information necessary to disclose? Why should they disclose?

Should students have to be asked this information or encouraged to do so? My first thought was this demographic data is great reporting to nursing program accreditation. However, currently diversity in students and faculty is reviewed but, not a criteria that will impact a nursing programs ability to obtain accreditation. What made me feel uncomfortable in this conversation was that only one other faculty could answer the question for the most likely cause along with myself as to why these questions are often left unanswered. It is hard to fathom that itself racism and structural racism barriers continue to exist in higher education.

Students of color may fear a difference in treatment or not getting acceptance into the program if they chose to disclose. We have to continue working toward breaking barriers in the area of structural racism. This is an example of a potential bias that may be occurring to students from diverse backgrounds. We must continue to have faculty from diverse backgrounds available to mentor these students and who look like them in university settings.

Another question would be do we eliminate this information from the applications. Is this discriminatory in any way? Should the results be seen only from an administrative view? There are so many questions about why this information is used. We could potentially limit who see’s this data. Admissions committees should be limited on this information so that implicit bias are not occurring.

NBNA Announces New Board of Directors and Nominations Committee 2021-2022

NBNA Announces New Board of Directors and Nominations Committee 2021-2022

NBNA is pleased to announce its newly elected Officers, Board Members and Nominations Committee Members.

Officers

President and CEO (re-elected)
Martha A. Dawson, DNP, RN, FACHE, Associate Professor, University of Alabama at Birmingham, School of Nursing, Birmingham, AL


Secretary (re-elected)

Sasha DuBois, MSN, RN, Nurse Administrator, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA

Board of Directors
Kim Cartwright, LPN, Account Manager, Medstar Visiting Nurse Association, Clinton, MD

Mary Kelly, DNP, MSN, MHA, NEA-BC, Senior Director, Cancer Center and Infusion Services, University Medical Center New Orleans, New Orleans, LA

Angelo Moore, PhD, RN, NE-BC, Program Manager, Duke Cancer Institute, Office
of Health Equity, Chapel Hill, NC

Ardenia Norris, Student Representative, Auburn University at Montgomery,
Montgomery, AL


New Nominating Committee Members
Joni Lovelace, RN, BS, CCM, CNC, President and CEO, Lovelace Multi-Care Health Services, LLC, Atlanta, GA

Vaple I. Robinson, PhD, RN, MSL, CHES, Associate Professor, Coppin State University, Helene Fuld School of Nursing, Baltimore, MD

Appointed New Officers

Parliamentarian
Lovene Knight, PhD, RN, Retired.

Historian
Cynthia Bell, MSN, BSN, RN, Retired, Nurse Manager/Assistant Chief, Homeless and Mental Health Residential, Rehabilitation Treatment Center, Louis Stokes Cleveland Veterans Medical Center, Cleveland, OH

The remaining Officers and Board Members are: Dr. Sheldon Fields, First Vice President; Dr. Marcia Lowe, Second Vice President; Dr. Evelyn Collier-Dixon, Treasurer; Dr. Eric J. Williams; Immediate Past President; Constance Brown, Dr. Shirley Evers-Manly, Dr. Denise Ferrell, Dr. C. Alicia Georges, Dr. Rebecca Harris-Smith.

The NBNA mission is “to serve as the voice for black nurses and diverse populations ensuring equal access to professional development, promoting educational opportunities and improving health.”

For more information, please visit www.nbna.org.

NBNA Announces New Board of Directors and Nominations Committee 2021-2022

NBNA Announces Keynote Speakers for Virtual 49th Annual Institute and Conference to be held on August 4-8, 2021

The National Black Nurses Association is pleased to announce Ena Williams, MBA, MSM, BSN, RN, CENP, of Yale New Haven Hospital and Otis Rolley of The Rockefeller Foundation as the official keynote speakers for the 49th Annual Institute and Conference to be held virtually on August 4-8, 2021. The theme of this year’s conference is “Celebrating 50 Years of Innovative Community Service, Practice, Education, and Research in Nursing.”

Otis Rolley is the Senior Vice President, U.S. Equity and Economic Opportunity Initiative (US EEO) at The Rockefeller Foundation. Recognizing low wage workers as essential, even prior to COVID-19, Otis is directing all U.S. work focused on enhancing the ability of every working person to meet the basic financial needs of their family and have a path to a better future. With a focus on equity, Otis provides stewardship for U.S. grant making and investing that is aligned to strategic levers to fill key economic opportunity gaps in tax and budget policy design and implementation; access to capital and asset ownership; and worker coalition-building and advocacy.

Immediately prior to joining the Foundation in 2019, Otis served as a North America Managing Director for 100 Resilient Cities, a major project sponsored by The Rockefeller Foundation. There he provided urban resilience (economic, environmental Sustainability and community development) technical assistance and portfolio management for 29 cities throughout the U.S. and Canada. A true urbanist, Otis’ career has been dedicated to advancing equity, economic and community development in cities, and leading organizations in the for-profit, public, and non-profit sectors.

Opening Ceremony and 50th Anniversary Celebration:
Equity First: Prioritizing People in Covid Testing & Vaccination
Thursday, August 5
6:00 pm – 8:00 pm

Ena Williams, MBA, MSM, BSN, RN, CENP, is the Senior Vice President and Chief Nursing Officer at Yale New Haven Hospital in New Haven, Connecticut – a 1541 bed ANCC 3-time Magnet ® designated, level I trauma, academic medical center. She has oversight of nearly 6000 nurses and clinical staff, with responsibility for practice, quality, workforce, nursing resources, patient experience and general operations. Ena assumed the role of chief nursing officer in 2018 and has since led the team through an ANCC accreditation of the Vizient Nurse Residency Program in 2018 which was recognized with 12 best practices. As CNO, she also led the team through the COVID-19 pandemic, leading clinical and operational teams across the health system, and caring for nearly 7000 COVID patients. Most recently she led the team through their 3rd Magnet designation.

Closing Keynote:
Addressing Health Equity through Innovative Nursing Leadership
Sunday, August 8
10:00 am to 11:00 am

About the Virtual 49th Annual Institute and Conference
Expecting more than 500 nurses and nursing students to attend the conference, registration is now underway. To register for the virtual conference, members and nonmembers go here. More information about the conference and detailed agenda is located at https://www.nbna.org/conf.

The conference will provide the opportunity for attendees to receive up to 35 contact hours and attend two days of NBNA workshops, mentorship sessions, Under 40 events, development programs, lunch and learns, and so much more!

Conference Objectives:
• Discuss the importance of a nurse’s ability to be resilient and practice self-care.
• Discuss disruptive trends in health care delivery and inequity in healthcare.
• Examine emerging opportunities for transforming the future of nursing through innovative
nursing/interdisciplinary practice, education, research, and policy advocacy.
• Identify new models of care to reduce inequities in health care and improve health outcomes for minority and underserved communities.

To join the conversation on social media, follow NBNA on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook and use the hashtags #NBNACelebrates50Years, #NBNAResilient, #NBNAConference21.


About the National Black Nurses Association
Founded in 1971, the National Black Nurses Association (NBNA) is a professional organization representing 308,000 African American registered nurses, licensed vocational/practical nurses, and nursing students in 108 chapters and 34 states. The NBNA mission is “to serve as the voice for Black nurses and diverse populations ensuring equal access to professional development, promoting educational opportunities and improving health.” NBNA chapters offer voluntary hours providing health education and screenings to community residents in collaboration with community-based partners, including faith-based organizations, civic, fraternal, hospitals, and schools of nursing. For more information, visit nbna.org. Follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter! #NBNAResilient, #NBNACelebrates50Years, #NBNAConference21

Media Contact:
Keisha Ricks, NBNA Marketing and Communications Manager
[email protected]

Diversity in Nursing Faculty

Diversity in Nursing Faculty

Diversity in the nursing faculty has been an ongoing topic of discussion. Over the last year, there has been a degree of discourse in the United States. Many universities created or are in the process of creating position statements for diversity, equity, and inclusion. The question is, why did we have to wait? Why not be proactive instead of being reactive?

At my alma mater, Norfolk State University, a historically Black university, I was welcomed with open arms, not just from the nursing faculty but all faculty. It resonates with the student and self-efficacy when they can see people who look like them, who have reached the goals they are attempting to achieve.

As an African-American nursing faculty member for RN, MSN, Nurse Practitioner, and DNP students, my goal is to help my students reach their goals. It is a bonus to help inspire a person of color that may not have felt the encouragement of their counterparts.

While I am here to make a difference, there still are challenges that I face as a doctorate-prepared professor, where I am not treated equitably. Researchers Christine Salvucci and Carolyn A. Lawless reported in the  2016 that minority faculty of color have unique experiences, which has an impact on interpersonal relationships and the professional components of their career compared with White colleagues. In some of the articles that were reviewed, there was a review of topics that included “Insincerity and Putting You in Your Place,” “Invalidation of Sense of Self,” and “Unequal Standards.” As some of my colleagues of color and I have discussed and experienced these topics, the aforementioned topics resonate with me. There is increasing diversity in the students that are presenting to advance their education. How can we begin to retrospectively attempt to address diversity, equity, and inclusion for the students, and we have not properly addressed for the faculty? We have to do better. More research is required, and change is necessary.

Combating AAPI Racism with Education and Advocacy

Combating AAPI Racism with Education and Advocacy

With a recent and horrifying uptick in hate crimes against Asian Americans, May’s Asian Pacific American Heritage Month is especially timely to help educate people and find another opportunity to eliminate the systemic racism that leads to such harmful incidents.

According to the Center for Study of Hate & Extremism, the rate of anti-Asian hate crimes rose 149 percent in 2020 alone and continues to rise in 2021. The long-lasting implications for being a target of a hate crime or even part of a larger group that is being targeted are troublesome. Whether you’ve experienced AAPI racism personally or seen it happen to colleagues, family, or friends, the impact to mental health and personal security is only the beginning of the potential detrimental effects.

As a nurse, you may treat patients who have been hurt or threatened in a hate crime. You may treat people who direct hate and threats at you or someone in your care. The concern and fear can be paralyzing, and making sure your colleagues and supervisors are aware of incidents can help your organization track them.

One of the best ways to help allay fear, confusion, and concern is to use resources and information. If your patients are concerned and are looking for guidance, many excellent organizations are devoted to helping stop AAPI hate. You’ll find resources through the National Asian Pacific American Bar Association, the Association of Asian Pacific Community Health Organizations (AAPCHO), or Stop AAPI Hate.

And it’s helpful to have the government recognize the problem and take active steps to mitigate hate crimes. The COVID-19 Hate Crimes Act, recently signed into law by President Joe Biden, is designed to make reporting hate crimes easier through more extensive public outreach, straightforward reporting and resources available  in multiple languages, and community education opportunities to reduce crime.

AAPI nurses can find a professional organization such as the Asian American/Pacific Islander Nurses Association, Inc., that offers resources and support as well. You can check out their past newsletters to find out about what nurses across the country are working on, topics of concern or interest, and news about conferences or professional development opportunities. As many minority nurses find excellent networking opportunities though professional organizations dedicated to their identity, belonging to AAPINA can also help you learn methods to combat racism that other nurses around the country have had success with.

And if you’re a nursing student, look into any AAPINA chapters in your school or in nearby schools. Vanderbilt University has an AAPINA student nurses chapter as does the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing. If your school doesn’t have a chapter, reach out to an existing chapter and find out about them. Ask how they formed, what helps them thrive as a student group, and what their membership finds most valuable.

Throughout the healthcare industry, organizations are collaborating to help fight racism and hate crimes. The National Commission to Address Racism in Nursing will tackle the issue in a broad approach with multiple organizations. With large and small efforts, progress will be made and honoring Asian Pacific American Heritage Month offers more opportunities for action.

Why Increasing Diversity in Nursing is Important

Why Increasing Diversity in Nursing is Important

Nursing strives to exceed the boundaries when it comes to providing patient care in the United States, and nursing leaders have long understood the importance of diversity in the workplace to obtain quality outcomes for their patients.

Over the last decade, the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) has dedicated efforts to diversify the workforce. The aim is to have adequate representation from all groups—including men and individuals from the African American, Alaskan Native, Asian, Hispanic, Native American, Native Hawaiian, and those of other backgrounds.

Improving nurse workforce diversity will help decrease health disparities and increase health equity so all people of all groups can be as healthy as possible. Because different populations often present symptoms dissimilarly or are predisposed to distinct conditions, it’s important for nursing schools and staff to gain a wider perspective on the patients they serve. In parallel, when nursing staff mirrors the population they serve, it’s common for patients to feel more trusting and comfortable discussing their personal concerns and symptoms.

The National Council of State Boards of Nursing (NCSBN) and The Forum of State Nursing Workforce Centers were surveyed in 2017 to look at the cultural makeup of the nursing pool. Registered Nurses (RN) from minority backgrounds represented 19.2% of the workforce.

The survey identified the RN ethnic backgrounds comprised of 80.8% white/Caucasian; 7.5% Asian; 6.2% African American; 5.3% Hispanic; 0.4% Native American/Alaskan Native; 0.5% Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander; 1.7% Two or more races; and 2.9% other nurses. Of the total nursing workforce, men accounted for 9.9% of the workforce, up from 1.1% from 2015.

Elmhurst University, located just outside of Chicago, is committed to successfully recruiting and retaining their nursing students to meet the growing need in their communities. Elmhurst’s mission is to prepare nurses for professional practice and exceed leadership roles to meet the needs of a diverse society.

If you are looking for a new career path in high demand, a degree in nursing can launch you into a highly respected, satisfying, and financially stable profession. Elmhurst University understands the importance of providing high-quality nursing degrees in a timeframe that matches the workforce demand.

Find the Right Program for You

Elmhurst University offers a distance accelerated BSN nursing program for those who are ready to begin their nursing career today. Students complete all course requirements in less than 2 years. An online distance learning structure allows those living in remote areas to gain access to a high-quality nursing education. Furthermore, there are just two on-campus visits during the program, limiting the number of travel disruptions to students.

Elmhurst University nursing students

Elmhurst University nursing students.

The 16-month fast-track program prepares students to sit for the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN) exam. Elmhurst University is consistently above the national and state scoring averages on the NCLEX exam. In 2020, 90% of their BSN students passed the exam.

Elmhurst University’s application process is easy to access online. Apply today and take the first step to a rewarding career.

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