New ENA Foundation Program Promotes Diversity in Nursing Research

New ENA Foundation Program Promotes Diversity in Nursing Research

The ENA Foundation’s new Emergency Nursing Diverse Voices Research Fellowship aims to increase diversity in nursing research.

In partnership with the Emergency Nursing Research Advisory Council and the Emergency Nurses Association Diversity, Equality and Inclusivity Committee, the ENA Foundation is accepting applications for the ENDVR Fellowship through March 3. The fellowship will better support and mentor emerging researchers who are members of underrepresented groups.

“The ENDVR Fellowship embodies two important foci for ENA including the important work of the DEI committee that began in 2019 and is in line with the Foundation’s efforts to increase the visibility of research grants,” said ENA Foundation Chairperson Jeff Solheim, MSN, RN, CEN, TCRN, CFRN, FAEN, FAAN. “It’s hoped that the ENDVR Fellowship will encourage nurses from underrepresented communities to undertake research projects that will reflect and address important issues in their communities.”

Selected applicants will attend and participate in research activities at Emergency Nursing 2022 in Denver; partner with a member of the Emergency Nursing Research Advisory Council who will serve as a mentor; develop a research project to be conducted locally; attend advisory council meetings; and present their results and findings at either Emergency Nursing 2023 or 2024. The fellowship may extend to two years as required.

“The Emergency Nursing Diverse Voices Research Fellowship is important because underrepresented nurses have been systematically excluded from research opportunities in nursing. This exclusion often means that critical perspectives are missing from the research that guides our practice,” said ENA DEI Committee Chairperson Anna Valdez, Ph.D., RN, FAEN, FAADN. “We are excited about this opportunity to work with and support diverse nurses who have an interest in emergency nursing research. I am looking forward to meeting and working with new fellows.

“I encourage diverse nurses to apply for the fellowship and want them to know that their voices and contributions to the profession are welcomes and valued at ENA,” Valdez added.

Click here to learn more about or apply for the Emergency Nursing Diverse Voices Research Fellowship.

About the ENA Foundation

The ENA Foundation, a 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organization, is the philanthropic arm of the Emergency Nurses Association. The Foundation fuels the future of emergency nursing with a mission focused on providing academic scholarships and research grants to emergency nurses. Since 1991, the ENA Foundation has awarded approximately $5.3 million to more than 2,300 emergency nurses to help them earn degrees, expand their skills through continuing education and conduct research projects directly related to emergency nursing and led by nurse researchers.

Making History: Q&A with NPWH’s First Black Chair Shawana Moore

Making History: Q&A with NPWH’s First Black Chair Shawana Moore

On January 1st, Shawana Moore, DNP, MSN, CRNP, WHNP-BC, assumed the role of Chair of the National Association of Nurse Practitioners in Women’s Health (NPWH). She also happens to be the first Black woman to hold the position, which lasts through December 31, 2024.

We interviewed Moore, who is also Assistant Professor/Director of the Women’s Health Gender-Related Nurse Practitioner Program at Thomas Jefferson University College of Nursing, to find out what this means to her and her plans for the future.

Shawana Moore

Shawana Moore, DNP, MSN, CRNP, WHNP-BC

What drew you to wanting to take a leadership position like this? When did you first become involved in NPWH?

My desire to impact diverse communities and amplify the voices of historically marginalized women and gender-related populations. I became involved in NPWH as a Program Director in 2014. NPWH provided the opportunity for individuals leading Women’s Health Nurse Practitioner/Women’s Health Gender-Related Nurse Practitioner programs throughout the nation to collaborate and share knowledge.

Being the first Black Chair in the organization’s 41-year history has to mean a great deal to you and other nurses of color. How did this make you feel? What do you think this says to nurses who are BIPOC?

I am honored and humbled to serve as the first African American Chair of NPWH. I hope to pave a pathway for other nurses from the BIPOC community to be elected or appointed to leadership positions within national organizations. This historical milestone within NPWH history displays to other nurse’s from BIPOC populations that they have the opportunity and capabilities to lead in high-level positions within the profession of nursing.

What are you bringing to the organization that past Chair/Presidents who were not BIPOC couldn’t have?  

Each Chair/President brings their perspectives, life experiences, and expertise to lead in this position. Those who have come before me have led the organizations to new heights. As I embark on this new role, my uniqueness as a Black woman brings a different viewpoint. I hope to use my perspectives, experiences, and expertise to facilitate and promote clinical practice, policy, community engagement, education, and research with a lens of equity.

What are your biggest challenges in this position? What do you think some of the greatest rewards are?

Being the first at anything comes with the challenge of not being seen or done before in the position. However, it serves as an opportunity to set the stage and create a pathway for others to build upon. The most significant rewards will be the opportunity to amplify historically silenced or unheard communities of women and gender-related populations, collaborate with other national organizations, and lead change within the profession using a lens of equity.

What advice would you give to nurses who are BIPOC about taking leadership roles?

I would advise nurses who are BIPOC to seek leadership roles in all facets of our profession. Their voices, perspectives, expertise, and experiences are valuable to society and can make meaningful and sustainable changes for communities of people.

National Black Nurses Association Celebrates and Honors Black History Month with Black Nurse Leaders

National Black Nurses Association Celebrates and Honors Black History Month with Black Nurse Leaders

The National Black Nurses Association (NBNA) is honored to celebrate Black History Month with the Black Nurse Leaders Series 2022 initiative. This effort highlights healthcare leaders who are prominent figures in their organizations and making transformational impacts in the field of nursing.

16 honored executives will be featured during the month of February.

 

NBNA President Dr. Martha A. Dawson leadership quote.

“There is no denying, at this time in history, nurses are leading the way in healthcare and our country,” stated NBNA President Dr. Martha A. Dawson. “This is an optimal time to share insights from  experienced top professionals in the field who can deliver thoughtful messages and inspire the next generation of black nurses. It is also very important to highlight prominent Black nurse leaders in this country who represent them. NBNA is ecstatic to share a stellar panel of professionals to honor Black History Month 2022!”

 

16 Nurses who will be featured during the month are:

  • Dr. Martha A. Dawson, President and CEO, National Black Nurses Association
  • Dr. Debra A. Toney, President, National Coalition of Ethnic Minority Nurse Associations
  • Dr. Dora Clayton-Jones, President, International Association of Sickle Cell Nurses and Professional Associates
  • Dr. Sarah Killian, National President, Chi Eta Phi Nursing Sorority, Inc.
  • Dr. Millicent Gorham, Executive Director, National Black Nurses Association
  • Dr. Ernest Grant, President, American Nurses Association
  • Dr. Lindsey Harris, President, Alabama State Nurses Association
  • Dr. Barbara Hatcher, President, Chi Eta Phi Education Foundation, Inc.
  • Patricia Lane, President-elect, American Association of Neuroscience Nurses
  • Dr. Beverly Malone, CEO, National League for Nursing
  • Donna Mazyck, CEO, National Association of School Nurses
  • Ottamissiah Moore, President, National Alliance of Wound Care and Ostomy
  • Dr. Tonya Moore, Executive Director, Mississippi Nurses Association
  • Beverly Morgan, President, Lambda Psi Nu Nursing Sorority, Inc.
  • Dr. Linda Scott, President-elect, American Academy of Nursing
  • Dr. Danielle McCamey, Founder, CEO & President, DNPs of Color

To view the full panel of featured nurse leaders and their background, go here. We encourage everyone to follow NBNA on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter to stay connected.

NBNA is currently accepting applications for membership. To become a member, go here for more information.

Official Hashtag: #NBNANurseLeaders2022

Featured Black History Month 2022 Black Nurse Leaders

The Nursing Program Admissions Gauntlet

The Nursing Program Admissions Gauntlet

To address health inequities in the United States, the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and the Institute of Medicine recommend increased representation of Black and other underserved populations in the health professions. Black nurses are more likely to work in underserved communities, but due to multiple barriers in our current admissions processes, Black students’ have limited access to RN education.

The majority of U.S. Registered Nurse (RN) graduates train in associate and bachelor’s degree programs. They apply first to the academic institution, complete prerequisite courses, and apply to the nursing program one or more years later. However, in a study of almost 2,500 pre-nursing students, only 44 of 252 Black students submitted a nursing application, with the majority withdrawing after freshman-level anatomy and physiology.

I have 28 years of experience as a professional nurse and 17 years in academia, yet my 3.3 high school grade point average (GPA) and 1,100 SAT score would have precluded my admission to most nursing programs. I was able to enter the field through an alternate pathway, the accelerated Master’s entry program in nursing at UC San Francisco, a program for students with bachelor’s degrees in other fields. Without this pathway and the use of holistic admissions review (HAR), I would not be a RN today.

HAR is one strategy to increase admission of Black students because it features the balanced use of academic metrics (e.g, GPA and standardized test scores), personal characteristics, and experiences in admissions selection. This is critical because academic metrics are significantly influenced by racial bias and economic privilege. According to a 2014 survey, a majority of dental (93%), medical (91%), and pharmacy (78%) programs embraced HAR in their admissions policies. However, only 47% of nursing programs used HAR. In 2021, 50% of nursing programs still relied exclusively on academic criteria for admissions. Several misconceptions sustain the admissions status quo in nursing education.

Misconception 1: “Black students are not interested in nursing.”

Reality: Thirty-two percent of nursing assistants and 23% of licensed vocational nurses are Black, far exceeding the representation in the general population (13%). Highly selective admissions criteria in colleges and universities could disqualify interested applicants before or during the admissions process. Black students, who are more likely to be educated in segregated and underfunded schools, might be overlooked in admissions screening due to lower test scores and grades. Additionally, health and liability insurance requirements can deter students who lack financial resources.

Misconception 2: “GPA and test score ranking is the most fair and efficient way to make admissions decisions.”

Reality: Academic metric-driven admissions are the fastest method, but not the most equitable. Compared to White and higher-income applicants, Black students’ perceived and actual performance is negatively affected by grading bias (elementary and higher education), disproportionate school suspension rates, arrests, and limited tutoring and test preparation access. In addition, they typically work more than their counterparts leaving less time for studying and test preparation.

Misconception 3: “Academic support services must be established before admitting Black students.”

Reality: The admission of Black students is not equivalent to admitting unqualified students. Programs that implemented HAR reported unchanged or increased GPAs, graduation, and licensure pass rates. However, Black students could benefit from university services such as summer bridge, academic advising, counseling, and financial aid programs to address non-academic stressors (because income is a predictor of nursing program success). Nursing programs can also work to promote a sense of belonging and engagement to boost performance without increasing resource demands.

Misconception 4: “Students admitted using lowered admission standards will fail licensure exams.”

Reality: The admission of qualified Black students is not equivalent to lowered admission standards. More Black students might qualify for admission if programs used HAR for the selection process. Graduation and licensure pass rates are associated with science GPA and standardized nursing tests (TEAS), but not overall GPA (most common). Additionally, there is no evidence to suggest that a student with a 3.5 GPA and a 58 test score is less likely to succeed than one with a 4.0 and 85.

Misconception 5: It is illegal to consider race in admissions.

Reality: Since the 1996 ban on Affirmative Action, academic institutions successfully defended their use of race as a mission-aligned component of admissions policies in 3 Supreme Court cases. HAR is one of few evidence-based approaches to increase student diversity in health professional education programs.

Without targeted efforts to increase Black student enrollment, highly selective admissions policies will continue to present access barriers for qualified students in nursing. The American Association of Colleges of Nursing and the Association of American Medical Colleges published guides for HAR implementation, yet, the majority of nursing programs rely solely on academic metric criteria for admissions even though qualified Black students are disadvantaged by them. The original purpose of GPA and standardized test use in U.S. higher education was to segregate White American students from immigrants and Black students. Their use in 2022 as a standard of admissions policy continues to restrict Black student access to nursing education, as evidenced by the fact that 74% of the RN workforce, health care’s largest sector, identify as White. In order to facilitate diverse workforce development that enhances health and education equity, exclusionary college admissions policies must be replaced with HAR.

Report Explores International Nurses’ Experiences in US

Report Explores International Nurses’ Experiences in US

As a predicted nursing shortage continues to impact healthcare options across the nation, a recent survey by O’Grady Peyton revealed some information about international nurses working in the United States.

The report by O’Grady Peyton, a US healthcare staffing agency with a focus on international nursing, explores some of the roles thousands of international nurses fill while also showing some of their experiences working as an international nurse.

With a respondent size of nearly 600 nurses, the 2021 Survey Of International Nurses revealed that a higher proportion of international nurses are working in roles that are traditionally challenging and high stress. For instance, international nurses work  in emergency departments (8 percent vs. 5 percent of all nurses), psychiatric units (11 percent vs. 4 percent of all nurses), and in intensive care units (19 percent vs. 15 percent).

The report’s findings state that approximately 300,000 nurses (about 8 percent of the nurses providing care) in the United States are internationally trained. Of those numbers, these nurses also hold high rates of education with 90 percent of the respondents having attained a bachelor’s degree in nursing or higher (12 percent hold a master’s degree in nursing and 1 percent have a DNP degree). In comparison, the latest statistics from 2019 indicate that about 56 percent of nurses hold a BSN or higher, so the numbers may have increased slightly.

The survey results show the majority of the nurses surveyed come from the Philippines, Jamaica, and India, with a slightly smaller percentage coming from Africa. Overall, international nurses have considerable experience working in the field before coming to the US with nearly 9 out of 10 international nurses having at least 10 years of nursing experience and 49 percent reporting 20 or more years of nursing experience.

As these nurses have worked in the US, they have managed the care of COVID patients and have helped fill the extreme pressure on nursing staff everywhere. Eighty-six percent of the respondents have provided care for patients with COVID and more than half have treated multiple COVID patients. The resulting physical and emotional stress, as with all nurses, is having an impact. One third of the respondents said their mental health was affected by the pandemic and that the greatest stress comes from treating such severely ill patients. There is also significant stress from the anxiety around contracting COVID-19 themselves (17 percent said they have contracted the virus).

The international nurse respondents said they overwhelmingly felt accepted by their patients and colleagues, with more than 8 in 10 reporting that positive acceptance. The results weren’t as strong for other areas–only 56 percent felt that their pay was on par with what US nurses make. And just over a third conveyed experiencing discrimination often or many times based on their country of origin or ethnicity, the report stated.

Experiencing burnout is nothing new for nurses, but the pandemic has certainly made the stressors on nurses worse. The survey reports high levels of international nurses feeling some level of burnout (81 percent), but that despite the strain of the job, 8 in 10 of the respondents said they would work in the US if given the choice to do it over again.

Read the full report for more information on international nurses working in the United States today.

Tips for Prospective Students Applying to Nursing School

Tips for Prospective Students Applying to Nursing School

Going to school while working full-time as a nurse and raising a four-year-old with her husband isn’t easy, so Ashley Willie knew she wanted an online nursing program with supportive instructors and a flexible schedule.

Penn State DNP student Ashley Willie, MSN.

DNP student Ashley Willie, MSN.

Willie, who is pursuing a doctorate in nursing online through Penn State World Campus, where she also received a master’s in nursing, said she wanted professors who were inclusive and available to meet with students.

“I wanted instructors who were interested in their students’ personal and career goals as well as their educational goals,” she said.

In addition, she said, “I was looking for a program that didn’t require me to be online at a certain time. I wanted more freedom and autonomy.”

Willie said prospective nursing students should look at what kind of financial support and resources are available for minority students, as well as what past and current students and instructors have to say about the program. And of course, they should check the matriculation rate and accreditation of a school, she said.

 

Financial support: putting your money where your mouth is

Sheldon Fields, the inaugural associate dean for equity and inclusion at the Penn State Ross and Carol Nese College of Nursing, agreed that prospective students should look at what kind of financial resources an institution commits to multicultural students.

Sheldon Fields, PhD, RN, CRNP, FNP-BC, AACRN, FNAP, FAANP, FAAN.

Sheldon Fields, PhD, RN, CRNP, FNP-BC, AACRN, FNAP, FAANP, FAAN. Associate Dean for Equity and Inclusion, Ross and Carol Nese College of Nursing.

“To put their money where their mouths are, schools need to be committing resources — sponsoring lecture series, offering scholarships, resources specifically focused on supporting multicultural students,” he said.

Fields, who has been a nurse for 30 years, said schools should have a clear stance on diversity, equity and inclusion that is reflected in their mission statement and their strategic plan, which should be available online, and should also teach diversity, equity and inclusion issues as part of their undergraduate and graduate curricula.

If there are no multicultural nursing student groups and the topic appears to be ignored, “It’s a big red flag,” Fields said. “A multicultural student is not going to find support for who they are, for the unique perspectives and talents that they bring, and the needs they have.”

Fields urged prospective students to look carefully at a school’s nursing faculty.

“It’s one thing to say you want a diverse faculty; it’s another to actually make it happen,” he said.

Denita Wright Watson, associate director of equity, inclusion, and advocacy for the Penn State World Campus Student Affairs office, urged students to seek out institutions that focus on addressing health care disparities, inequities, and bias in health care and that are focused not only on attracting diverse talent, but also retaining it. Schools should go beyond lip service to invest in students’ academic and professional success, she said, by providing professional development opportunities and other career services, as well as supporting students’ personal well-being through mental health support, student identity groups and DEI–related programs.

 

Ask questions

Denita Wright Watson, MLD.

Denita Wright Watson, MLD, Assoc. Director of Equity, Inclusion, & Advocacy for Student Affairs. Penn State World Campus.

Students should ask, “What support is out there for me, beyond academic support?” Wright Watson said. “What support is there to aid in my growth as a person?”

Prospective students should “scour and scour” a school’s website not only for their mission and values statements, but also to see what service projects the institution is involved in and what kind of speakers and events are offered, Wright Watson said.

“Google should be their best friends,” she said. “Just ask questions: Why should I pick this university? Why should I pick this program? What are they doing to meet the needs of underserved students and communities?”

Fields added: “Ask them, ‘What did you learn in a program about diversity, equity and inclusion?’ If they tell you nothing — run the other way.”

 

Feeling valued

Willie agreed that it’s important to look for an institution that recognizes health care inequities and equips students with tools to help reduce health care disparities, seeking to improve health care outcomes at both the individual and the population levels. An example of that is teaching students methods of recognizing vulnerable populations and using evidence-based tactics to improve health care literacy and health and wellness, she said.

All her professors at Penn State have valued both her cultural and professional background and make time to meet with individual students to discuss their goals and aspirations, Willie said.

“For me this is very important because not only do I feel valued individually, I feel like the instructors are invested in my success as a woman of color.”

Visit the Penn State World Campus website for more information about earning a nursing degree or certificate online.

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