Celebrate Certified Nurses Day Today

Celebrate Certified Nurses Day Today

Today marks the annual celebration of Certified Nurses Day to let nurses know just how important additional training is for career growth and for patient care.

Certified Nurses Day gives a shout out to nurses who take on the additional training and education to gain board-certified credentials in their area of specialty or in an area in which they want to gain more expertise. With many dozens of certifications available, nurses can find something that will help them do their jobs better.

Why is certification so important? In addition to gaining the extra knowledge, taking the initiative to gain certification shows a nurse who is willing to do all he or she can to offer the best care possible. As methods, equipment, and evidence-based outcomes change frequently, certification is one way to keep up-to-date on the very latest information in your area of specialty.

What about nurses whose jobs don’t require are specialization in one particular area? If your job requires more of a general skill set, then more than one certification can help you as a nurse. Do you work in an ICU that sees lots of heart patients? Or in an ER where you see asthma attacks? Or are you especially interested in wound care? Certifications in heart failure, asthma, emergency care, wound care, women’s health, palliative care and hospice, and nurse leadership are just a few of the available certifications nurses can hold.

If you are interested in gaining knowledge and learning as much as you can, you can earn more than one certification, and, in fact, doing so makes your expertise deepen.

If you are debating whether you should get certified or not, know that it adds a level of status to your professional standing and lead to greater opportunities. Employers appreciate the effort and like to have nurses who gain credentials.

Certification is hard work and you do have to pass an exam to receive your credential, so you should choose those that will expand your skills in a strategic manner. When you do gain a credential, take pride in knowing you are doing all you can to advocate for, protect, and care for those in your care.


East Meets West in the Bathroom

East Meets West in the Bathroom

A patient needed assistance in the bathroom.  An elderly, obese, female with Lupus affecting her legs and hips needed help transferring from her electric wheelchair and some assistance with hygiene and buttoning her pants. It’s something I’ve done a million times and I didn’t think twice about it. What happened later made me think about the differences in cultures between India and the United States and how to approach these differences when they come up with someone in the workplace.

After the job was completed and the patient gone, the episode came up in conversation between the patient’s doctor, who is from India, and myself. While she didn’t exactly dress me down, she was very firm that clinic nurses were not supposed to help patients in the bathroom. She gave me several reasons:

“The patient takes care of herself at home. Why do you need to do it here?”

“If the patient has a caregiver at home, where is the caregiver now?”

“What if you get injured, who is going to take care of you?”

“If you help her in the bathroom this time, she will expect help every time she comes.”

I thought about this conversation for a long time. Without a doubt, I was correct to help the patient. This I know. It’s required by the nursing oath, and it’s required by my own moral code. Why did this doctor see things so differently?

Indian society is rigidly stratified by religious and socioeconomic class. At the bottom are the untouchables who work with waste. This stratification was formalized during British rule with some 60,000 different classifications. With this in mind, I realized that my doctor was actually trying to protect me from performing work outside my caste, which would be degrading to me. From my point of view, all people are created equally. As a nurse, when someone asks for help, I don’t have to decide if that person is worthy of my help or if performing a task is outside of what is permitted by my caste. I just do it.

From the doctor’s point of view, I was performing a task outside of what is permitted by my caste and performing it for a person who is of lower status than myself. I was breaking social norms, degrading myself, and degrading the clinic and other nurses whom she expected would not perform such duties. After doing some thinking, I can now appreciate her point of view, but it is not my point of view. The tricky part is how to address it in the future in a culturally sensitive manner. I don’t want to insult my doctor. She is in a position of power over me. I don’t want to break my nursing oath or my personal moral code to always offer assistance when someone asks. In this case, I’ve decided to simply not bring it up again. I will continue to perform my nursing duties as I always have without mentioning it. I will respect my doctor’s culture by simply avoiding the subject in the future. In a perfect world where I’m king, I would explain to the doctor my point of view and expect her to change her point of view to suit my own. However, the world is not perfect, and I’m not king. So respect, cultural sensitivity, and work relationships will win out over my personal feelings.

Shortcuts to Boost Your Nutrition

Shortcuts to Boost Your Nutrition

March is National Nutrition Month and offers up a good time to think of tweaking your diet.

Nurses are especially prone to falling into an eating-on-the-run trap. With long shifts that barely offer time to sit, nurses rarely have the luxury of taking the time to eat a relaxing meal when they are on the job. No one recommends eating quickly, but, let’s face it, most nurses have to eat quickly or they won’t eat at all.

During National Nutrition Month, the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics helps people focus on making nutritious choices. Knowing that nurses have short bursts of time in which to get the most nutrition possible, they have to plan ahead to map out what is the best eating plan for them. Leaving it all to chance means fast food that might be higher in fat and salt and lower in things like fiber.

What makes sense for nurses? Figure out what and how you eat throughout the day and try to find foods that can fit that pattern but that offer a nutrition boost. Do you make a coffee run and add in a danish or a roll? Is lunch whatever is left in the vending machine and that you can eat in the few minutes you have?

Packing your food at home and bringing it with you is an easy option. Once you get into the habit of prepping your food at home (beware – it can feel like a chore until you get into a groove) you’ll have an instant fallback of food you like to eat, that gives you energy, and that provides you with the most nutrition possible.

Salads are an excellent way to pack in vegetables, fruits, and some great protein, but they take a lot of time to eat. You can keep the focus on the nutrition a salad provides and bring other foods that are healthy but take less time to eat. One of the easiest ways to pack in all those veggies and fruits is with a smoothie. Throw all the ingredients into a blender, add some protein powder or high-protein Greek yogurt, and you have an easy-to-digest and quick-to-eat option.

Lots of granola bars in the supermarket offer wholesome ingredients without extra sugar or added binders. With pure ingredients like nuts, seeds, and dried fruit, these bars are easy to tuck into a bag, don’t take a lot of time to eat, and offer energy-boosting nutrition. You can also make your own trail mix to bring. Customize it to include the ingredients you like and you’ll get an even more pure (and less sugary) small meal. Pair it with a yogurt drink, a hard boiled egg, or a few slices of rolled deli meat and you’ll feel more energized for a longer time.

If you think it will fit into your day, pack smaller portions, but eat more frequently. A small bowl of brown rice or quinoa, lentils, beans, or chicken, and some finely chopped veggies takes less time to eat than a bagel with cream cheese and offers a powerhouse of hunger-fighting fiber, protein, and nutrients.

And one of the best ways to keep yourself energized is to stay hydrated. Instead of fueling with caffeine all day, add in some other beverages. Try to swap out soda with flavored seltzers (add in some juice if you need more flavor) or throw a couple of fruit-flavored herbal tea bags into your water bottle with a little lemon. Being even slightly dehydrated quickly saps your energy and makes your body work harder at everything.

With a few small changes, you can give your body the energy and nutrition to have a more productive day and better overall health.

Informed Consent and Informed Refusal in Managing Patient Expectations

Informed Consent and Informed Refusal in Managing Patient Expectations

Insights from the new Nurse Practitioner Claim Report: 4th Edition from CNA and Nurses Service Organization (NSO) show that the majority of claims against nurse practitioners developed from a failure involving core competencies, such as diagnosis, medication prescribing, or treatment and care management. Allegations related to failure to diagnose and improper prescribing/managing of controlled drugs occurred most frequently.

What the report also found was that in many claims, the nurse practitioner met the standard of care, but the patient was nonetheless dissatisfied, often due to a lack of communication or understanding. The informed consent discussion represents the first step in managing patient expectations, thus reducing the possibility of a misunderstanding and mitigating the risk of a consequent lawsuit.

Additionally, documenting the informed consent process provides the best defense in the event a patient alleges that the proposed treatment, other options, or the potential for injury were not adequately explained to them. Refer to state statutes for guidance on the informed consent process, as there is considerable variance among states. This is especially true when it comes to caring for minors or cognitively impaired patients, and emergency situations.

The informed consent process involves two main components:

  • Discussion, providing the patient with sufficient information about and time to consider:
    • The nature of the proposed treatment, including rationale, anticipated benefits and prognosis.
    • Alternatives to the proposed treatment, including specialty referral options or no treatment at all. This should also include an explanation of why, according to one’s professional judgment, the recommended treatment is preferable to alternatives.
    • Foreseeable risks, including potential complications of the proposed treatment and risks of refusing it.
  • Documentation of the discussion and the outcome of the discussion in the healthcare information record, which often includes the use of a written informed consent form in addition to the verbal component.

The informed refusal process is similar to, but goes beyond, the process for informed consent. Refusal of care increases the potential liability exposure for the nurse practitioner, but nurse practitioners can help minimize their liability exposure by being aware of their consequent responsibilities and documenting the informed refusal process.

Nurse practitioners who continue caring for a patient after they decline treatment recommendations must be aware of their responsibility to:

  • Continue to examine and diagnose the patient for the duration of the practitioner-patient relationship and as long as the patient continues to refuse treatment.
  • Continue to inform the patient about the condition and its associated risks, while the practitioner-patient relationship is in place, the condition exists, and the patient continues to refuse treatment.
  • Continue to inform the patient how their refusal of treatment may affect treatment of other conditions or problems, when discussing these conditions.

After discussing the potential consequences of refusal with the patient, nurse practitioners should complete a comprehensive progress note and document the refusal using a written form, which should be incorporated into the patient health care information record. Progress notes should document:

  • The individuals present during the discussion.
  • The treatment discussed.
  • The risks of not following treatment recommendations, listing the specific risks mentioned.
  • The brochures and other educational resources provided.
  • The questions asked and answers given by both parties.
  • The patient’s refusal of the recommended care.
  • The patient’s reasons for refusal.
  • The fact that the patient continues to refuse the recommended treatment.

As the data proves, it is imperative for nurse practitioners to protect their patients and their practice by documenting all phases of medical treatment, discussing (and documenting) the nature of all proposed treatments with patients as well as educating them about the need for follow-up, and signs and symptoms that should prompt a follow-up call.

In addition, today’s nurse practitioners must continuously evaluate and enhance their patient safety and risk management practices by remaining current regarding their clinical practice, medications, biologics, and equipment utilized for the diagnosis and treatment of acute and chronic illnesses and conditions related to one’s specialty and obtain regular continuing education.

Disclaimer: This article is provided for general informational purposes only and is not intended to provide individualized business, risk management or legal advice.  It is not intended to be a substitute for any professional standards, guidelines or workplace policies related to the subject matter.

This risk management information was provided by Nurses Service Organization (NSO), the nation’s largest provider of nurses’ professional liability insurance coverage for over 550,000 nurses since 1976. Reproduction without permission of the publisher is prohibited. For questions, send an e-mail to [email protected] or call 1-800-247-1500. www.nso.com.

Patient Safety Awareness Week

Patient Safety Awareness Week

National Patient Safety Awareness Week (March 11 – 17focuses attention squarely on one thing at the top of every nurse’s list – keeping patients safe.

Minority Nurse spoke with Patricia McGaffigan, RN, MS, CPPS, vice president, safety programs at the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) about the ongoing issues around patient safety and how nurses can continue to implement positive and productive change.

While nurses provide a majority of care in inpatient settings, McGaffigan says the issue of patient safety extends to a wider setting as interprofessional teams are responsible for so many levels of care.

Because of the nurse’s role, they are especially able to impact patient care. “Nurses represent the largest segment of the healthcare workforce, in roles that range from the bedside to the boardroom,” says McGaffigan. “One specific and relatively easy way that nurses can effect change is to become educated in foundational safety science.” Nurses who aren’t trained in safety science can obtain training, and many student nurses receive the training as part of the curriculum. “Nurses are perfectly positioned to be able to identify risks and hazards in their work environments that may be mitigated before harm occurs, and this daily commitment to mindfulness about preventing harm before it happens is vital.”

As nurses, ongoing education, and maintaining and obtaining appropriate certifications help nurses provide the optimal care when they are with patients. Consistency in providing care and following a standard of care plan help patient outcomes as well.

Nurse-sensitive indicators that reflect structure, process, and outcome are of great importance to nurses.” she says. “As a profession, we want to ensure that we have appropriate numbers of skilled nursing professionals who are able to meet the unique needs of patients and families. Process measures are focused on ensuring that we deliver the right care in a consistent and reliable manner.”

Patient harm can result when there is a lack of guidance or an absent standard to follow, says McGaffigan. For instance, harm can result when patients aren’t regularly repositioned or when oral care in ventilated patients is neglected. Other areas of particular importance include medication errors, falls, hospital-acquired infections, or complications, and other injury.

To provide the best care, nurses must also be able to care for themselves. If they are overly fatigued, do not feel supported or able to thrive in their organizations or if they are working in an organization where a culture of safety is not emphasized, patients cannot receive optimal care and nurses themselves might be at greater risk.

Nurses are increasingly and very appropriately focused on their own physical and emotional safety, as well as cultures of safety,” she says.

The interactions that build relationships between nurses and patients are key to keeping patients safe. “Nurses are often the profession that has the most interaction with patients and families,” says McGaffigan. “We can consistently strive to identify the needs and preferences of patients and families, and also ask patients and family members what matters to them, and what they might be worried about.” McGaffigan knows this first hand. “As a former pediatric critical care nurse, one of my greatest ‘early warning systems’ was when a parent might tell me that ‘something just doesn’t feel right about my child,’” she says.

When errors do happen, a transparent process to understand what went wrong, assess the cause, and prevent future harm is essential. “Punitive cultures exacerbate reluctance to report near-misses and errors,” says McGaffigan. “Nurses can become more familiar with Surveys of Patient Safety Culture, identify areas where unit and organizational performance is stronger or weaker, and play a key role as leaders and participants in initiatives to improve scores on their survey domains.”

Patient safety continues to evolve as new medical technologies are introduced and as patient care continues to become more complex and more challenging.

Nurses, as well as our other colleagues in healthcare, have chosen our profession because we have a core value of ensuring that our care is not only technically sound and appropriate, but is safe,” says McGaffigan. “As nursing professionals, we come to work every day to ensure nothing less than safe care. Whether we are in traditional roles at the bedside or as nursing leaders, educating our next generation of nurses, sitting on boards of directors of health care organizations, serving in formal patient safety positions, contributing to progress in the medical device and pharmaceutical industries, or more, we individually and collectively embody safety as our core value.”

Those who enter the profession do so knowing they are often a patient’s greatest advocate and a crucial partner in receiving the best care. “We are committed to creating a world where patients are free from harm,” she says, “and we advocate and anchor our healthcare system to not simply regard safety as ‘one more thing that we do,’ but understand that ‘it is the one thing that must permeate and provide the foundation for all that we do.’” 

Reassessing Male Behavior in the Workplace

Reassessing Male Behavior in the Workplace

I’m orienting as a charge nurse at a clinic. A middle-aged gay man (well, late middle age), surrounded by young women. Something odd happened that I want to share. My clinical partner, a charge nurse with 35 years of experience, pulled me into a room. “I’m going to tell you something awkward. Some of the nurses have said they feel uncomfortable when you touch them on the shoulder.”

You could have knocked me over with a feather. I honestly didn’t remember ever touching anyone and said as much. However, later that same day I actually caught myself just as I was about to touch a coworker on the shoulder and say, “Thanks for helping me with that patient.”  So I had touched someone….without their permission, without thinking about it.  I really had to rethink my behavior toward the opposite sex in the current climate.

Women are finding their power. Things that might have slipped by in the past are no longer going to get a pass. Frankly, I think it was a long (centuries) time coming. I hope it continues. I know it will. I’m excited to live in a time where women’s rights and female empowerment is in ascendancy.

I guess I just thought that being gay somehow made me immune from charges of sexual harassment (from women at least). This is just not the case. Harassment is in the eye of the beholder. If someone is uncomfortable with something, he or she has a right to their feelings, even if, from the other side, he/she/we may feel that nothing was done wrong (or at least intended). It’s hard to grasp, but important. Harassment is whatever someone says it is.

I admit, my feelings were hurt. I did not intend to make a coworker uncomfortable. My being gay or straight has no bearing on the issue of someone else’s feelings. I won’t argue that I didn’t mean to. I won’t say that I’m a hugger, or come from an affectionate family. Whatever my reasons for touching someone without their permission are not pertinent. All I can do is identify the behavior that caused the problem and fix it going forward.

Some might argue that the pendulum of women’s rights has swung too far. Anyone can say they feel harassed about anything. Any innocent touch, a pat on the back, is harassment and it’s just too crazy. That’s not the way to look at it. The #MeToo movement did not happen in a vacuum. It takes place in the context of an entire human history of women being treated as property and all that entails. There was a time when gay-bashing was, if not a national past-time, at least a frequent diversion, and I’ve been the victim of it several times. Gay rights didn’t happen in a vacuum, either. The broken body of Mathew Sheppard brings to mind exactly why we are fighting. Now, women are fighting.

What I’m saying is that I understand that women have a right to be seen and heard, respected, and not touched in the workplace. They have a right to pick and choose how they will be interacted with and what is appropriate. They fought for that right and continue to do so.

I’m glad that someone thought enough about me to point out something I could improve upon in my work life. I’ll keep an open mind, and my hands to myself in the future.