Celebrate Forensic Nurses Day Today

Celebrate Forensic Nurses Day Today

If you’re a nursing student equally fascinated by both medical and legal issues, forensic nursing might be just the career path for you.

Today is Forensic Nurses Day, falling at the end of Forensic Nurses Week (November 11-15). This observation gives nurses an opportunity to consider this distinctive area of their profession. Forensic nurses treat people medically but they are also responsible for uncovering the sources of injury, illness, or even death. The week is sponsored by the International Association of Forensic Nurses, the leading professional association for this nursing specialty.

Forensic nurses can practice in various settings and with roles that vary significantly. This is a good career choice for nurses who like to switch up their roles while still relying on a base set of expertise and skills. Nurses in this role have a passion and for helping people who are victims of violence. They balance their medical treatment with a deeply compassionate nursing approach to help a patient in the midst of a trauma, all while pulling together pieces of what happened to help find out more.

Because of the patient population they serve, forensic nurses work closely with the judicial system. Nurses in this role may care for patients who have suffered sexual violence, partner violence, elder abuse, child abuse, or another kind of injury that is often, but not always, intentional. Some forensic nurses work in the corrections system.

While they treat patients, they are often collecting evidence to help the legal system’s potential prosecution of the person or persons who hurt them. They may work with police officers to gather evidence or with prosecutors to relay information about the injuries.

Nurses who deal with trauma have to have a deep well of compassion and a steely focus to help the patient while trying to uncover as much information as possible. They rely on excellent nursing knowledge and skills to work with patients who come to them while processing a traumatic event or long-term trauma and often scared. But they also must develop a delicate expertise in injury—particularly the cause of it, where it is, and how long it has been present.

Forensic nurses can specialize in particular areas as well – focusing on elderly populations, psychiatric cases, or children. Still others may become specialists in situations where a person died as the result of violent acts, and they help the investigation with their medical knowledge. Nurses who become trained to assist victims of sexual assault and violence can become a Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner (SANE) nurse.

Forensic nurses work in the world of trauma so they need the emotional, physical, and spiritual resources to support their own reactions to seeing so much intentional injury. The stories and cases can overwhelm even the most seasoned nurse at times. Coping skills are a forensic nurse’s magic cape, so being able to recognize, accept, and mitigate job stress are essential.

While they deal with people who have been hurt, forensic nurses have a front-line view of the issues surrounding violence and work as advocates for violence prevention. They may even be expected to appear in court to relay information about a specific case.

Forensic nurses are allies to patients who are hurt both physically and mentally. They deserve a shout out of thanks this week for all they do.

Perioperative Nurses Use Complex Skills

Perioperative Nurses Use Complex Skills

With millions of surgeries taking place annually across the nation, a career as a perioperative nurse is one that is both secure and exciting. This week’s recognition of Perioperative Nurses Week (November 10-16) lets people know about the critical work these nurses do throughout a surgical process.

Perioperative nurses serve the vital role of helping patients before and after surgery to ensure they are safe, informed, and comfortable. These nurses also take on the role of being the patient’s advocate when they are in surgery and unable to speak for themselves.

Organizations such as the Association of periOperative Registered Nurses (AORN) are excellent resources of information and education in this career. Perioperative nurses depend on a variety of medical, critical thinking, social, and analytical skills every time they report to work. No day is every the same as the one before, and perioperative nurses know even routine surgery isn’t always routine.

With this responsibility, perioperative nurses are experts at understanding how a human body reacts under surgery and how human emotions can be unpredictable pre- and post-surgery.

Patients see perioperative nurses before they go into the OR. All the talk that goes on isn’t just idle chit chat, as perioperative nurses have specific expertise in chatting with patients to find out more about them. They are naturally interested in learning more about the patient, but they are also looking for information they can use when the patient is coming out of anesthesia.

People can become confused, agitated, happy, or sad when they are waking up from surgery, and an experienced perioperative nurse knows just how to guide the situation so the patient feels safe, is medically stable, and can get reoriented. Nurses will use the information they gained pre-op to talk to the patient. Maybe the person likes golf or talked about family or mentioned a quilting habit. Bringing up those familiar and happy associations helps patients enormously and also makes a nurse’s job easier. Managing a patient who is calmer makes their recovery easier, faster, and safer.

Many people don’t know the nurse who cares for them before and after surgery is also present by their side during surgery. During Perioperative Nurses Week, nurses can make a point to let people know of the complexities of this role.

They are patient advocates, but they are also a core part of the surgical team as well. Nurses in the surgical suite must be experts at preventing problems and spotting any issues immediately. With their attention fully on the patient, they are in charge of noticing if a patient is reacting poorly to any part of the process. They keep track of the monitors to see blood pressure, oxygen levels, and heart activity, but they have to continually assess the patient visually. They will notice any change in the patient’s physical body—from breathing patterns to skin color changes—that could indicate a problem.

The perioperative nurse relies on a toolbox that holds a little bit of everything—an  intense focus, up-to-date medical skills, keen attention to the patient, social ease, and compassion—to help patients through surgery.

If you’re a perioperative nurse, take some time this week to celebrate the care you give your patients, the teamwork you contribute, and the way your work elevates the entire nursing profession.

 

 

A Nurse Practitioner Keeps Communities Healthy

A Nurse Practitioner Keeps Communities Healthy

Operating with the highest level of autonomy, nurse practitioners are lifelines for many patients.

This week’s designation as National Nurse Practitioner Week (November 10-16) is an excellent time to examine the roles nurse practitioners (NPs) play in the nation’s healthcare system.

The American Association of Nurse Practitioners is a leading professional organization for NPs and also leads advocacy for issues relating to NPs. A nurse practitioner has achieved an educational path that brings them to Advanced Practice Registered Nurse (ARPN) designation. That gives them essential nursing knowledge and combines it with the ability to use it in a more comprehensive manner than a registered nurse (the first step to becoming an NP).

One of the biggest challenges facing NPs today is achieving full-practice authority (FPA) in all states. Because NPs have wide-ranging responsibilities that include examining and treating patients, diagnosing illness, and prescribing medications, they often work at the level of a physician. In some states, a nurse practitioner is not mandated to work under the supervision of a physician or required to have a physician sign off on some of their treatments. In states that don’t recognize the full practice authority of an NP, that additional layer of physician sign-off is required.

A nurse practitioner is able to “hang a shingle” and operate as a solo practice in any location. Many NPs choose to do so in remote areas where practicing physicians are hard to find or in urban areas where transportation to a medical office is a barrier to care. They are a vital cog in the healthcare wheel. They often assume many of the responsibilities of a primary care physician, developing relationships and providing preventive and long-term care. They see and treat patients with chronic diseases like asthma or diabetes and work in conjunction with a specialized care team as well.

If upping your career to a nurse practitioner level interests you, there are steps to get started. NPs require a master’s in nursing (with a focus on the population you intend to serve) and achieving a PhD in nursing is desirable for this role. After becoming a registered nurse, completing the BSN and MSN, you’ll need to earn your state-level advanced practice nursing license.

While NP authority is determined on the state level, there is progress toward achieving a national model. For now, some states participate in the APRN Contract, which allows a nurse holding an APRN license to essentially have authority to practice in several states. Not all states are part of the ARPN, so you’ll need to check to see where your own practice location, or intended location, fits in.

Career outlooks for NPs are stable. As the number of family practice physicians decline and the population increases, NPs are there to help patients on a high level. They are also able to work with communities that may not have had reliable medical care in years. The freedom to develop deep and lasting multigenerational relationships with patients and families is a routinely cited reason for working in this busy role.

If you’re an NP, National Nurse Practitioner Week is a good reminder to let people know of the training and skill set required of nurses in this area of nursing. And it’s a good time to give yourself a pat on the back for all you do.

Communicating with Patients Who Have Developmental Disabilities

Communicating with Patients Who Have Developmental Disabilities

As a nurse, being able to communicate effectively with patients is crucial. But communicating with patients who have developmental disabilities may be more difficult at times.

Georgia Reiner, Risk Specialist, Nurses Service Organization (NSO), knows how to interact with these types of patients and answered our questions on what you can do to communicate with them better.

Why should nurses communicate differently with patients with developmental disabilities? When do they need to make sure that a parent or guardian is there?

People with developmental disabilities such as Down syndrome or who are on the autism spectrum face significant barriers to accessing quality care. Inadequate communication between the patient and health care providers is one of those barriers that can result in harm to the patient. Effective communication is the keystone for ensuring quality, patient-centered care for patients who have developmental disabilities. With skill and patience, nurses can help keep patients safe.

It is important to ask patients if they want their support worker or caregiver to stay with them.

What should nurses do to communicate better with these specific patients?

In order to communicate better with specific patients, nurses must establish the patient’s communication strengths and challenges and tailor their approach accordingly. Nurses need to document preferences in the patient’s health record so that they are accessible to all members of the team.

It is also very important for nurses to allow enough time to listen and understand that interactions may take longer. Nurses need to know that differences in muscle tone for some individuals may complicate reading their facial expressions or body language. Additionally, it is important to choose appropriate, concrete language. Explaining concepts clearly and directly while using specific words and visual aids can be very helpful.

How can they make sure that they are being clear while not “talking down” to these patients?

Nurses can make sure that they are being clear while not “talking down” to these patients by establishing rapport. They need to make sure that they are speaking directly to the patient—as opposed to a family member or caregiver—when possible. It is also important to avoid talking to an adult as if he or she is a child. Nurses should take time to assess the patient’s understanding and to validate their own perceptions to make sure they are understanding the patient. Nurses are encouraged to use the “teach-back” method to ask the patient to repeat the information back to them.

What are the most important concepts that nurses should keep in mind when communicating with these patients?

It is important for nurses to give patients with developmental disabilities exact instructions and explain what they are doing in sequence. Try to eliminate distractions where possible, by meeting in a private, quiet room.

Nurses should also avoid asking abstract questions, and instead be direct. For example, ask “Are you tired?” instead of “How do you feel?”

If the patient uses a communication device that you are not familiar with and the patient cannot show you how to use it, ask the caregiver to do so.

Let patients know they can bring a favorite item they like to have with them in order to help regulate sensory stimuli.

What should nurses never do while communicating with these patients?

Nurses should never shout; speak slowly, in a normal tone of voice.

Nurses should never assume that their body language and facial expressions will be understood. Respect differences in communication style. For example, many patients with autism spectrum disorder prefer avoiding eye contact.

Nurses should never touch a patient without telling them when and where before doing so. Act out or demonstrate actions for patients who prefer non-verbal communication.

What else is important for our readers to know about communicating with patients with developmental disabilities?

People with developmental disabilities deserve the best possible care from health care providers, including preventive health measures and appropriate management of health conditions. By being knowledgeable on how to effectively communicate with patients who have developmental disabilities, and practicing different communication strategies, nurses can become more confident, and provide patient-centered care. Through thoughtful communication and collaboration with caregivers, family, and the interprofessional team, nurses can help achieve the goal of optimal care—and optimal outcomes.

Nurses are only one segment of the interprofessional team, but they are frequently the strongest patient advocate. At the end of the day, working as a team, advocating for patients, providing information and education in the patient’s preferred communication style, and collaborating with caregivers and family members, can help nurses end the stigma of caring for patients with developmental disabilities and achieve the goal of optimal care and outcomes.

Urology Nurses Treat Patients with Care

Urology Nurses Treat Patients with Care

Urology nurses are the nurses who care for patients with a range of conditions and diseases that impact the urologic system.

This week highlights the care these nurses give with Urology Nurses and Associates Week running from November 1-7. Sponsored by the Society of Urologic Nurses and Associates (SUNA), the week offers a time to recognize this particular area of nursing while also calling attention to urologic conditions.

According to the American Medical Association, urology covers conditions of the urinary tract, the reproductive tract of males, urinary tract infections, cancer, incontinence, reconstructive urology, urogynecology, stones in the urinary tract, and some aspects of male and female infertility.

Urology nurses may treat adult or pediatric cases and may see cases from the routine to the exceedingly complex. They are called on to help men and women who present with sexual dysfunction or to help those with congenital conditions. They may assist with surgical procedures or with continual care of chronic conditions.

As a urology nurse, education is an important job responsibility. Nurses are a patient’s first resource for managing, coping with, and treating a condition. Patients turn to nurses to find out how to prevent a urinary tract infection, how to manage a catheter, or what kind of recovery they face after urologic surgery.

Within this role of educator, nurses can help patients manage expectation of healing, understand any prescriptions, or activity restrictions, and understand what is happening to their bodies. Urology nurses can help patients’ families learn how to help with the care and healing process as well. Minority nurses in the field are especially important as the more they understand the culture of a patient, including dietary traditions, the better they can help them heal.

Urology nurses are also the best ambassadors for this area of nursing. The Urology Nurses and Associates Week is a good time to celebrate with colleagues, and it’s also an opportunity to learn more and help educate others about what you do. You can send a photo of your team to the local paper with a short explanation of your success or how you care for people.

You can also take your voice public. Think of ways you can work in your community or on a wider platform to promote better policies to protect nurses and patients. Become a member of a professional nursing organization in your specialty, like SUNA, and volunteer your time to make an impact in whatever way you can.

Any nurse is committed to lifelong learning, so seek out ways to learn more. Become certified in urology nursing if you have not already. Take courses or sign up for webinars with your healthcare organization to refresh your knowledge on any area of nursing. Decide to become the go-to person in your unit on treating a specific condition and learn all you can to make that a reality. Take on leadership roles within your local nursing association chapter so you can develop agendas that keep urology nursing at the forefront of healthcare priorities.

And be sure to take a moment and think of how your hard work changes the lives of the patients in your care. Urologic issues often hold a certain level of embarrassment for some patients, so the compassionate and empathetic care urology nurses give is meaningful and will be remembered.

Medical-Surgical Nurses Promote Broad Skills

Medical-Surgical Nurses Promote Broad Skills

Each year the Academy of Medical-Surgical Nurses (AMSN) celebrates med-surg nurses with Medical-Surgical Nurses Week.

This year, Medical-Surgical Nurses Week runs from November 1-7 and helps bring attention to this broad and complex nursing specialty.

According to AMSN, medical surgical nurses are a vital part of a healthcare team, juggling many different duties with top-notch patient care, including the following:

  • Being advocates and activists for their patients and patient care protocols
  • Using evidence-based practices to inform the patient care they give
  • Educating the public, patients, and families on healthcare and the nursing profession
  • Researching for healthcare improvements
  • Supporting others in the nursing profession and acting as mentors and proponents within the med-surg specialty
  • Working for the best patient care practices by encouraging and promoting certification and high standards in nursing

Med-surg nurses work primarily in a hospital setting and care for patients who have been admitted for illness, are recovering from surgery, or are receiving treatment for ongoing chronic conditions that require hospital care. Med-surg nurses are registered nurses, and they work with adult, not pediatric, patients.

Nurses in this specialty are trained to recognize, diagnose, treat, and manage a variety of conditions as the patient population and their health conditions are diverse. Nurses in this role are treating many patients at once, helping their team coordinate and provide the proper care, monitoring medications, and watching for changes that could indicate an improvement or decline.

These nurses also work with families of the patient to help them understand what’s going on, the treatment plans, what will happen after the patient goes home, and what they can do to help.

These nurses also help patients who do not have strong support systems, so they are able to receive necessary care when they go home using various community, government, and local resources to pull together a plan of care.

Because they do not focus on one specialty, med-surg nurses have vast knowledge about what could present for a patient. One patient who arrives with sepsis from a wound could progress to pneumonia. Or a patient who comes in complaining of a sore shoulder could be having heart troubles. Med-surge nurses are alert to these changes and watch for red flags for all their patients.

Med-surg nursing is the largest nursing specialty in the nation, with the AMSN estimating approximately 650,000 med-surg nurses in the United States. Most nursing students will complete at least one med-surg clinical as it offers a broad application of all the skills nursing students are learning.

If students choose to move into a med-surg career, they will want to obtain certification, which can be as a Certified Medical-Surgical Registered Nurse (CMSRN®) or as an RN-BC.

Medical-surgical nurses are the engine of many healthcare and hospital settings. Celebrating the hard work they do is a welcome recognition for their efforts.