OMH Announces Upcoming Virtual Symposium to Advance the Response to COVID-19

OMH Announces Upcoming Virtual Symposium to Advance the Response to COVID-19

OMH Announces Upcoming Virtual Symposium to Advance the Response to COVID-19The HHS Office of Minority Health (OMH) is hosting a virtual symposium on Thursday, September 17, 2020 to highlight state, tribal, territorial and community-based efforts to address COVID-19 among racial and ethnic minority populations. The Advancing the Response to COVID-19: Sharing Promising Programs and Practices for Racial and Ethnic Minority Communities virtual symposium will feature national, state, tribal and local experts leading these efforts and is developed for public health leaders at all levels and community organizations confronting the pandemic.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), a history of systemic health and social inequities have put racial and ethnic minority groups at an elevated risk of contracting COVID-19 or experiencing severe illness, regardless of age. CDC data suggests the prevalence of diabetes, cardiovascular disease and other underlying conditions also contribute to disparities in health outcomes within communities of color.

The OMH virtual symposium aims to support the dissemination of promising practices, programs and strategies for combating COVID-19, especially in racial and ethnic minority communities.

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BCEN Celebrates 40 Years of the CEN

BCEN Celebrates 40 Years of the CEN

Milestones are a big deal, and they are often times of celebration. Throughout July, that’s exactly what the Board of Certification for Emergency Nursing (BCEN) has done. This month marks the 40th of the Certified Emergency Nurse (CEN) as well as of the emergency nursing specialty certification. What makes this all even more significant is that the CEN was the first emergency nursing specialty certification offered anywhere in the world.

“As emergency medicine was becoming recognized as a specialty, emergency nurses formed the Emergency Department Nurses Association (today’s Emergency Nurses Association) and in the mid- to late-1970s recognized the need for a certification program for emergency nurses. Thanks to the forethought and efforts of the association and some extraordinary nurse-pioneers, the Board of Certification for Emergency Nursing (BCEN) came into being and several years after its creation was purposefully separated from the professional association to become a fully independent certification body,” explains Janie Schumaker, MBA, BSN, RN, CEN, CENP, CPHA, FABC, the Executive Director of BCEN, which is based in Oak Brook, Illinois.

Taking that first CEN exam was much different than it is today. “During BCEN’s first full year of operations in 1980, the very first emergency certification exam was offered on July 19 at over 30 sites around the country, including Alaska,” says Schumaker. “More than 1,400 RNs took the four-hour, 250-item, pencil-and-paper exam. After waiting several weeks for notification by mail, 1,274 nurses received the news that they had passed and became the first RNs to earn the Certified Emergency Nurse (CEN) credential.

“While BCEN has operated independently from ENA for many decades, we support each other and strongly believe professional membership and board certification are both important for RN success and to advance nursing excellence across every nursing specialty.”

Two years later, in 1982, that number of nurses who held the CEN had increased to 6,000. By 2005, 23,000 nurses held a CEN. By the end of 2020, BCEN expects to have 40,000 CENs.

“As the years went by and emergency nursing knowledge and patient care needs evolved, for instance with the introduction of medevac flights and taking into the consideration the unique physiology of pediatric patients, BCEN developed and introduced certification programs for flight nurses, the Certified Flight Registered Nurse (CFRN®) in 1993, the Certified Transport Registered Nurse (CTRN®) in 2006 for critical care ground transport nurses, and the Certified Pediatric Registered Nurse (CPEN®) in 2009. BCEN’s newest certification, introduced a little over 4 years ago (in 2016) is the Trauma Certified Registered Nurse (TCRN®) for nurses who practice across the trauma continuum from prehospital care to rehabilitation and including injury prevention. This is our fastest growing certification program, which is not surprising given that trauma is a major public health issue affecting people of all ages,” says Schumaker.

And BCEN keeps making sure that nurses can learn more. This past May, it began offering its first certificate program BCEN EDvantage.

Schumaker, a certified nurse, says that she is sure the skills she learned through becoming certified saved lives. “Once the connection between my knowledge, the care I was providing, and the correlation to studying for the Certified Emergency Nurses exam was clear to me, I became a lifelong certification advocate. I have since become certified in other areas of practice that have been a part of my career. Certification has helped ensure I have the knowledge and expertise to do the best possible job in my given role,” says Schumaker. “To me that is huge because I want to be a strong contributor and make a difference.”

UConn School of Nursing Receives $3 Million Grant to Help Students with Disadvantaged Backgrounds Become Nurse Practitioners

UConn School of Nursing Receives $3 Million Grant to Help Students with Disadvantaged Backgrounds Become Nurse Practitioners

The UConn School of Nursing is pleased to announce it has received a nationally competitive grant award from the U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration for a groundbreaking program. The innovative “PATH to PCNP” Clinical-Academic Partnership aims to increase diversity among primary care providers in medically underserved communities in Connecticut.

The nearly $3 million grant will provide scholarship support to 24 undergraduate students with disadvantaged backgrounds each year for five years. Six students from each academic year – freshman, sophomore, junior, and senior – will receive scholarships starting in the 2020-21 academic year.

“The mission of the School of Nursing is to educate nursing scholars, clinicians, and leaders, with the goal of advancing the health of individuals, communities, and systems,” says School of Nursing Dean Deborah Chyun. “The funding provided through this innovative program for underrepresented students will enhance their ability to focus on their education and graduate with minimal debt, in the hopes that they will go on to serve the areas of our state that are most in need.”

The group of faculty members leading this initiative at the School of Nursing includes: Ivy Alexander, Ph.D., APRN, ANP-BC, FAANP, FAAN; Natalie Shook, Ph.D.; Marianne Snyder, Ph.D., MSN, RN; and Thomas Van Hoof, MD, EdD, FACP.

Despite efforts to recruit registered nurses with disadvantaged backgrounds to the School of Nursing’s primary care nurse practitioner (PCNP) master’s program, numbers of such students remain low, according to Alexander. In order to increase diversity among PCNPs, the School must first increase successful completion of the bachelor’s program among disadvantaged students, and without overwhelming debt.

The objective of “PATH to PCNP” (Provide Academic Transformational Help for disadvantaged nursing students to become Primary Care Nurse Practitioners) is to help such students graduate on time through a “fast track” undergraduate program. The partnership will: increase educational support for students with disadvantaged backgrounds; foster a sense of belonging and ability for positive self-care to reduce stress, anxiety and depression; and infuse primary care curriculum and experiences in medically underserved communities.

“Students participating in the ‘PATH to PCNP’ Program will have primary care experiences during their undergraduate nursing education and graduate ready to begin graduate school to become primary care nurse practitioners,” the faculty team says.

“PATH to PCNP” is a partnership between the UConn School of Nursing and Community Health Center Inc. Senior-level students in the program will complete a capstone clinical rotation at CHCI, gaining experience providing primary nursing care to patients with complex health issues in medically underserved communities. CHCI’s Chief Nursing Officer Mary Blankson, DNP, APRN, FNP-C, will lead the initiative at CHCI, which is one of the largest federally qualified health centers in the country.

SONSIEL Issues National Call-to-Action for Protective Equipment Inventory Donations

SONSIEL Issues National Call-to-Action for Protective Equipment Inventory Donations

In rapid response to the national emergency and to better combat COVID-19, the Society of Nurse Scientists Innovators Entrepreneurs & Leaders (SONSIEL) launched an immediate national call-to-action requesting that non-hospital inventories of personal protective equipment (PPE) be shared with hospital and healthcare facilities via community dialogue.

The call-to-action, deemed SHARE (Strengthen Healthcare Ability to Respond to Emergencies), seeks to quickly raise awareness about the need for PPE on the front lines of care, and to spur, at the grassroots level, an immediate community dialogue regarding available supplies of urgently needed equipment.

Non-hospital healthcare organizations and commercial businesses use PPE and other needed equipment in day-to-day activities. Nursing and medical schools, pharmaceutical labs, veterinarians, dentists, and simulation centers, even construction, cleaning, and landscaping companies, may have PPE access and inventory.

SONSIEL is asking hospital and healthcare facilities to look to these other entities for possible additional supply in order to help keep staff caring for COVID-19 patients and the patients themselves safe. The type of equipment needed, that commonly is used by other entities and in other industries, includes respirator masks, eyewear (goggles, shields, visors), and gloves (latex, latex-tipped, protective). Non-hospital healthcare providers also may have available inventories of gowns, caps, or other items.

Remarked Rebecca C. Love, SONSIEL President & Co-Founder, “Today, as this COVID-19 crisis unfolds, we’re launching a grassroots campaign, SHARE, to help ensure adequate supplies of equipment are available to healthcare workers tending to our most vulnerable population. At this time, many of our hospitals are facing a critical shortage of protective equipment; there are not enough gloves, masks, or gowns to safeguard our frontline healthcare workers. Healthcare workers must be protected—to enable them to continue to provide care, for their own well-being, and to prevent transmission to others. At present, there is this global shortage of equipment, a several-month delay, however we believe SHARE is an innovative, community-based solution that can help swiftly back-fill this temporary deficiency.”

“Please join SONSIEL in this vital effort. We are asking you and everyone across the country to get out the word and start a dialogue. Think innovatively about where appropriate and needed supplies might be found to SHARE. If you’re a business or scholastic institution, please consider how donations of any already available PPE within a community might help your local hospitals and healthcare providers. While particular region and facility needs may differ, coming together, directly, in a conversation, locally, helps all of our communities target, identify, and triage supplies and equipment, so that what is in stock is made available to healthcare providers as soon as possible.”

Ms. Love concluded, “I’d like to thank the entire SONSIEL Board of Directors, who acted quickly and completely in supporting this initiative at a critical point in time. Together, I know we will get through this challenge, all of us, one community at a time.”

Northeastern University and Massachusetts General Hospital are the first to engage in SHARE. SONSIEL hopes many organizations, businesses, and hospitals around the country will do the same.

For information on SHARE, visit https://sonsiel.org/coronavirus.

To donate to their GoFundMe campaign, visit https://www.gofundme.com/f/nurses-ppe-supplies.

NAINA Hosting 4th Leadership Conference in Maryland

NAINA Hosting 4th Leadership Conference in Maryland

NAINA Leadership ConferenceNational Association of Indian Nurses of America (NAINA) is celebrating the ‘Year of the Nurse and Midwife’ with a variety of activities throughout the year. NAINA, a professional organization for nurses of Asian Indian origin and heritage, collaborates with other national and international nurses associations in its journey towards professional excellence and improving global health. In 2019, NAINA joined the ‘Nursing Now’ global campaign. For the ‘Nursing Now’ campaign, NAINA selected three focus areas: enhancing clinical practice by continuing education, empowering nurses to become leaders at the bedside and beyond, and sharing examples of best nursing practices. In January 2020, NAINA joined the American Nurses Association’s Healthy Nurse, Healthy NationTM campaign as a champion organization to positively impact the health of its members and advance the goals of ANA.

NAINA’s upcoming national event on April 18th, 2020 will advance the goals for ‘Nursing Now’ and its commitment to the Healthy Nurse, Healthy Nation challenge thereby empowering nurses to take charge of their health and the health of the nation. NAINA’s 4th Leadership conference will be held at Howard Community College, Columbia, Maryland. This conference is designed for licensed health care professionals and pre-licensure students as well. This one-day event is designed to augment the knowledge, understanding, and appreciation for self-care, workplace safety, and promote resilience in nurses. The event will promote interprofessional learning and it will highlight how nurses can lead interprofessional teams from the bedside to the boardroom and promote health for themselves and others to build a healthy nation.

Deborah J. Baker, DNP, CRNP, NEA-BC, Senior Vice President for Nursing, Johns Hopkins Health System and Vice President of Nursing & Patient Care Services, Johns Hopkins Hospital will give the keynote address. Lois Gould, MS, PMP from American Nurses Association will address the participants on the topic of ‘Healthy Nurse, Healthy Nation: The Grand Challenge’. Mary Kay DeMarco, PhD, RN, CNE, past president, Maryland Nurses Association, Georgene Butler, PhD, RN, CNE, Dean, Health Sciences, Howard Community College, Maryland, and Bobby Varghese PhD, RN, CNE, Professor of Nursing, Broward College, Florida will speak on various topics related to the theme of the event: Healthy Nurse, Healthy Nation: Leading from the Bedside to Boardroom. Viji George, MA, BSN, RN, RNC-NIC will moderate the panel discussion on the domains of ‘Healthy Nurse, Healthy Nation grand challenge’ . Teams from several state chapters of NAINA will enact how to create joy and find meaning at work amid challenges and pressure.

NAINA is an ANCC accredited provider of nursing continuing professional development and nurses may earn up to 6.5 contact hours by completing this conference activity. Registration is open to nurses for this great educational event for an affordable price of $50.00. Please visit the NAINA website for details of the conference and other monthly NAINA webinars (www.nainausa.com).