NBNA Announces New Board of Directors and Nominations Committee 2021-2022

NBNA Announces New Board of Directors and Nominations Committee 2021-2022

NBNA is pleased to announce its newly elected Officers, Board Members and Nominations Committee Members.

Officers

President and CEO (re-elected)
Martha A. Dawson, DNP, RN, FACHE, Associate Professor, University of Alabama at Birmingham, School of Nursing, Birmingham, AL


Secretary (re-elected)

Sasha DuBois, MSN, RN, Nurse Administrator, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA

Board of Directors
Kim Cartwright, LPN, Account Manager, Medstar Visiting Nurse Association, Clinton, MD

Mary Kelly, DNP, MSN, MHA, NEA-BC, Senior Director, Cancer Center and Infusion Services, University Medical Center New Orleans, New Orleans, LA

Angelo Moore, PhD, RN, NE-BC, Program Manager, Duke Cancer Institute, Office
of Health Equity, Chapel Hill, NC

Ardenia Norris, Student Representative, Auburn University at Montgomery,
Montgomery, AL


New Nominating Committee Members
Joni Lovelace, RN, BS, CCM, CNC, President and CEO, Lovelace Multi-Care Health Services, LLC, Atlanta, GA

Vaple I. Robinson, PhD, RN, MSL, CHES, Associate Professor, Coppin State University, Helene Fuld School of Nursing, Baltimore, MD

Appointed New Officers

Parliamentarian
Lovene Knight, PhD, RN, Retired.

Historian
Cynthia Bell, MSN, BSN, RN, Retired, Nurse Manager/Assistant Chief, Homeless and Mental Health Residential, Rehabilitation Treatment Center, Louis Stokes Cleveland Veterans Medical Center, Cleveland, OH

The remaining Officers and Board Members are: Dr. Sheldon Fields, First Vice President; Dr. Marcia Lowe, Second Vice President; Dr. Evelyn Collier-Dixon, Treasurer; Dr. Eric J. Williams; Immediate Past President; Constance Brown, Dr. Shirley Evers-Manly, Dr. Denise Ferrell, Dr. C. Alicia Georges, Dr. Rebecca Harris-Smith.

The NBNA mission is “to serve as the voice for black nurses and diverse populations ensuring equal access to professional development, promoting educational opportunities and improving health.”

For more information, please visit www.nbna.org.

DUSON Launches New Center Focused on Latino Adolescent, Family Health

DUSON Launches New Center Focused on Latino Adolescent, Family Health

Latinos are the largest and youngest racial minority group in the U.S. – representing roughly a quarter of all people younger than 30 years old.

Duke University School of Nursing’s new Center for Latino Adolescent and Family Health (CLAFH) serves to engage in the health care of the Latino community by addressing the inequities facing it and by promoting the overall wellbeing of Latino youth and their families.

The Center was founded by its director Vincent Guilamo-Ramos, PhD, MPH, LCSW, RN, ANP-BC, PMHNP-BC, AAHIVS, FAAN, dean, Duke School of Nursing, and vice chancellor for nursing affairs, Duke University, with a mission to reduce health inequities and promote overall wellbeing among Latino adolescents and their families. CLAFH accomplishes that mission through its four key thematic areas:

  • Meaningfully engages the Latino community to identify, understand and collaboratively address the underlying drivers of health and social inequities.
  • Strengthening the role of families in supporting adolescent and young adult health and life opportunities through the development and evaluation of family-based interventions.
  • Developing and evaluating innovative, nurse-driven models of health care delivery that improve access to and utilization of prevention and treatment services in underserved communities.
  • Promoting the scale-up of evidence-based interventions in underserved communities to drive real-world impact, locally and nationally.

CLAFH has several current research projects in progress, including:

  • The Nurse Community-Family Partnership (NCFP) Program: Increasing COVID-19 Testing in Underserved Communities
    • As part of NIH’s Rapid Acceleration of Diagnostics in Underserved Communities (RADx-UP) initiative, CLAFH has been conducting this randomized controlled trial to see how effective NCFP is at increasing COVID-19 testing, vaccination and mitigation behaviors and reducing secondary sequelae among families in structurally disadvantaged communities.
  • Families Talking Together Plus (FTT+)
    • FTT+ is a remotely delivered, parent-based intervention that CLAFH has been analyzing to check the effectiveness of FTT+ at delaying sexual debut and informing correct and consistent condom use in youth who are sexually active.
  • Exploring Father-Son Relationships to Promote Adolescent Life Opportunities
    • The objective of this mixed-methods study is to learn more about how the father-son relationship can impact adolescent male academic/economic, social and behavioral resilience in the context of large-scale societal events.
  • Research Focused on Latino Sexual Health
    • Two central areas of CLAFH’s research are investigating Latino sexual health disparities and developing interventions to prevent STIs and unplanned pregnancies.
  • Latino-Focused Global Research
    • CLAFH’s work includes research, educational partnerships and service in Mexico and the Spanish-speaking Caribbean.

CLAFH offers research opportunities to Duke University students and welcomes collaborations with researchers and research institutions that are interested in projects related to Latino health and social welfare disparities.

CLAFH also houses the Latinx Comprehensive Development of Empowered Leaders Against AIDS Institute [DILES (Tell Them) Institute]), a year-long program for fellows wanting to end the HIV epidemic for Latino men. Throughout the program, participants will be instilled with leadership skills to assist them in guiding substantial change in their communities. The application process will open later this fall.

Associates in Research Adam Benzekri and Marco Thimm-Kaiser join Ramos as members of CLAFH’s core team, in addition to María de Lourdes Rosas López, CLAFH’s primary collaborator in Mexico and an Universidad Popular Autónoma del Estado de Puebla professor.

For more information, visit the CLAFH website, or email the team.

NBNA Announces New Board of Directors and Nominations Committee 2021-2022

NBNA Announces Keynote Speakers for Virtual 49th Annual Institute and Conference to be held on August 4-8, 2021

The National Black Nurses Association is pleased to announce Ena Williams, MBA, MSM, BSN, RN, CENP, of Yale New Haven Hospital and Otis Rolley of The Rockefeller Foundation as the official keynote speakers for the 49th Annual Institute and Conference to be held virtually on August 4-8, 2021. The theme of this year’s conference is “Celebrating 50 Years of Innovative Community Service, Practice, Education, and Research in Nursing.”

Otis Rolley is the Senior Vice President, U.S. Equity and Economic Opportunity Initiative (US EEO) at The Rockefeller Foundation. Recognizing low wage workers as essential, even prior to COVID-19, Otis is directing all U.S. work focused on enhancing the ability of every working person to meet the basic financial needs of their family and have a path to a better future. With a focus on equity, Otis provides stewardship for U.S. grant making and investing that is aligned to strategic levers to fill key economic opportunity gaps in tax and budget policy design and implementation; access to capital and asset ownership; and worker coalition-building and advocacy.

Immediately prior to joining the Foundation in 2019, Otis served as a North America Managing Director for 100 Resilient Cities, a major project sponsored by The Rockefeller Foundation. There he provided urban resilience (economic, environmental Sustainability and community development) technical assistance and portfolio management for 29 cities throughout the U.S. and Canada. A true urbanist, Otis’ career has been dedicated to advancing equity, economic and community development in cities, and leading organizations in the for-profit, public, and non-profit sectors.

Opening Ceremony and 50th Anniversary Celebration:
Equity First: Prioritizing People in Covid Testing & Vaccination
Thursday, August 5
6:00 pm – 8:00 pm

Ena Williams, MBA, MSM, BSN, RN, CENP, is the Senior Vice President and Chief Nursing Officer at Yale New Haven Hospital in New Haven, Connecticut – a 1541 bed ANCC 3-time Magnet ® designated, level I trauma, academic medical center. She has oversight of nearly 6000 nurses and clinical staff, with responsibility for practice, quality, workforce, nursing resources, patient experience and general operations. Ena assumed the role of chief nursing officer in 2018 and has since led the team through an ANCC accreditation of the Vizient Nurse Residency Program in 2018 which was recognized with 12 best practices. As CNO, she also led the team through the COVID-19 pandemic, leading clinical and operational teams across the health system, and caring for nearly 7000 COVID patients. Most recently she led the team through their 3rd Magnet designation.

Closing Keynote:
Addressing Health Equity through Innovative Nursing Leadership
Sunday, August 8
10:00 am to 11:00 am

About the Virtual 49th Annual Institute and Conference
Expecting more than 500 nurses and nursing students to attend the conference, registration is now underway. To register for the virtual conference, members and nonmembers go here. More information about the conference and detailed agenda is located at https://www.nbna.org/conf.

The conference will provide the opportunity for attendees to receive up to 35 contact hours and attend two days of NBNA workshops, mentorship sessions, Under 40 events, development programs, lunch and learns, and so much more!

Conference Objectives:
• Discuss the importance of a nurse’s ability to be resilient and practice self-care.
• Discuss disruptive trends in health care delivery and inequity in healthcare.
• Examine emerging opportunities for transforming the future of nursing through innovative
nursing/interdisciplinary practice, education, research, and policy advocacy.
• Identify new models of care to reduce inequities in health care and improve health outcomes for minority and underserved communities.

To join the conversation on social media, follow NBNA on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook and use the hashtags #NBNACelebrates50Years, #NBNAResilient, #NBNAConference21.


About the National Black Nurses Association
Founded in 1971, the National Black Nurses Association (NBNA) is a professional organization representing 308,000 African American registered nurses, licensed vocational/practical nurses, and nursing students in 108 chapters and 34 states. The NBNA mission is “to serve as the voice for Black nurses and diverse populations ensuring equal access to professional development, promoting educational opportunities and improving health.” NBNA chapters offer voluntary hours providing health education and screenings to community residents in collaboration with community-based partners, including faith-based organizations, civic, fraternal, hospitals, and schools of nursing. For more information, visit nbna.org. Follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter! #NBNAResilient, #NBNACelebrates50Years, #NBNAConference21

Media Contact:
Keisha Ricks, NBNA Marketing and Communications Manager
[email protected]

CDC to Invest $2.25 Billion in Covid-19 Disparities Among Underserved

CDC to Invest $2.25 Billion in Covid-19 Disparities Among Underserved

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) today announced a plan to invest $2.25 billion over two years to address Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)-related health disparities and advance health equity among populations that are at high-risk and underserved, including racial and ethnic minority groups and people living in rural areas. This funding represents CDC’s largest investment to date to support communities affected by COVID-19-related health disparities.

CDC’s new National Initiative to Address COVID-19 Health Disparities Among Populations at High-Risk and Underserved Communities, Including Racial and Ethnic Minority Populations and Rural Communities, will offer grants to public health departments to improve testing and contact tracing capabilities; develop innovative mitigation and prevention resources and services; improve data collection and reporting; build, leverage, and expand infrastructure support; and mobilize partners and collaborators to advance health equity and address social determinants of health as they relate to COVID-19.

“Everyone in America should have equal opportunity to be as healthy as possible,” said CDC Director Rochelle P. Walensky, MD, MPH. “This investment will be monumental in anchoring equity at the center of our nation’s COVID-19 response—and is a key step forward in bringing resources and focus to health inequities that have for far too long persisted in our country.”

Data show that COVID-19 has disproportionately affected some populations and placed them at higher risk, including those who are medically underserved, racial and ethnic minority groups, and people living in rural communities. These groups may experience higher risk of exposure, infection, hospitalization, and mortality. In addition, evidence shows that racial and ethnic minority groups and people living in rural communities have disproportionate rates of chronic diseases that can increase the risk of becoming severely ill from COVID-19 and may also encounter barriers to testing, treatment, or vaccination.

To stop the spread of the COVID-19 virus and move toward greater health equity, CDC continues to work with populations at higher risk, underserved and disproportionately affected to ensure resources are available to maintain and manage physical and mental health, including easy access to information, affordable testing, and medical and mental health care. For more information and community resources visit:  https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/community/health-equity/index.html

This initiative is funded through the Coronavirus Response and Relief Supplemental Appropriations Act, 2021, (P.L. 116-260) and is expected to award funding to up to 108 state, local, territorial, and freely associated state health departments, or their bona fide agents.  CDC will be accepting applications for this initiative through April 30, 2021.

Howard University and NYU Nursing Schools Partner to Further Nursing Research and Education

Howard University and NYU Nursing Schools Partner to Further Nursing Research and Education

Gina S. Brown, dean for the College of Nursing and Allied Health Sciences at Howard University (left) and Eileen Sullivan-Marx, dean of NYU Meyers (right)

Howard University’s College of Nursing and Allied Health Sciences and New York University’s Rory Meyers College of Nursing have formed an educational and research partnership to work together to have a greater impact on improving health and health equity in urban areas and global communities.

“We are ecstatic to be in partnership with such a prestigious educational institution as NYU Meyers at such a critical time within our nation’s health care cataclysm,” said Gina S. Brown, PhD, MSA, RN, FAAN, dean for the College of Nursing and Allied Health Sciences at Howard University. “The potential collaborations are endless.”

The new partnership will enable nursing researchers at Howard and NYU to collaborate on existing research projects and jointly apply for grant funding for new projects. The schools are in the process of applying for funding to develop a mentoring and education program to encourage African-American nurses to obtain specialty nursing certifications. In addition, faculty will be invited to attend research seminars and professional development opportunities at both schools.

“We are thrilled to build new ties to Howard University, one of the country’s top HBCUs, and to work closely with its expert nursing faculty,” said Eileen Sullivan-Marx, PhD, RN, FAAN, dean and Erline Perkins McGriff professor at NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing. “By formally establishing this partnership, we can develop unique opportunities for cross-school collaborations that address health inequities and increase our impact on improving care for the patients and communities we serve.”

In addition to fostering faculty and research collaborations, nursing students at Howard and NYU Meyers will have the opportunity to attend new and established programming through educational exchanges. For instance, Howard nursing students will be encouraged to participate in NYU Meyers’ 10-week summer research program, designed to engage undergraduate and graduate students from underrepresented backgrounds in mentored research. The NIH-funded program aims to develop the next generation of cardiovascular disease researchers, and NYU and Howard hope that participation will encourage more nursing students of color to pursue research doctorates in nursing or related fields.

The Howard-NYU partnership was catalyzed by Brown and NYU Meyers’ Audrey Lyndon, PhD, FAAN, RNC, professor and assistant dean for clinical research. While on faculty at the University of California, San Francisco, Lyndon worked closely with Brown on educational exchanges; they look forward to building upon this collaboration to change the future of nursing.

About NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing (@NYUNursing)
NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing is a global leader in nursing and health. Founded in 1932, the College offers B.S., M.S., DNP and Ph.D. degree programs providing the educational foundation to prepare the next generation of nursing leaders and researchers. NYU Meyers has several programs that are highly ranked by U.S. News & World Report and is among the top 10 nursing schools receiving NIH funding, thanks to its research mission and commitment to innovative approaches to health care worldwide.

About the Howard University College of Nursing and Allied Health Sciences
The College of Nursing and Allied Health Sciences is comprised of top-ranked educational programs that prepare health care professionals to be leaders and innovators in practice, education, research and service. Graduates are prepared to deliver patient-centered, interprofessional care and utilize cutting-edge technology and evidence-based practice to improve the health of all people with an emphasis on promoting health equity toward eliminating health disparities. Currently, the college offers degrees in the following accredited programs: bachelor’s degrees in clinical laboratory science, health management sciences, nursing, nutritional sciences and radiation therapy; master’s degrees in nursing, occupational therapy and physician assistant; a post-master’s certificate in nursing; a doctoral degree in physical therapy; and a master’s and doctoral degree in nutritional science in conjunction with the Howard University Graduate School. To learn more, visit cnahs.howard.edu/

HHS Office of Minority Health Announces #VaccineReady as the Theme for National Minority Health Month

HHS Office of Minority Health Announces #VaccineReady as the Theme for National Minority Health Month

April is National Minority Health Month, and this year, the HHS Office of Minority Health (OMH) is focusing on the impacts COVID-19 is having on racial and ethnic minority and American Indian and Alaska Native communities and underscoring the need for these vulnerable communities to get vaccinated as more vaccines become available. According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), certain vulnerable populations, such as non-Hispanic African Americans, individuals living in nonmetropolitan areas, and adults with lower levels of education, income or who do not have health insurance, have a higher likelihood of forgoing getting vaccinated.

This year’s theme for National Minority Health Month is #VaccineReady. The goal of this campaign is to empower vulnerable populations to get the facts about COVID-19 vaccines, share accurate vaccine information, participate in clinical trials, get vaccinated when the time comes, and proactively practice COVID-19 safety measures.

Studies show that COVID-19 vaccines are effective at keeping people from getting COVID-19 and the CDC recommends that everyone get vaccinated as soon as they are eligible. As more vaccines become available, there are steps communities can take to protect themselves until they can get vaccinated:

  • Wear a mask to protect yourself and others and stop the spread of COVID-19.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.
  • Stay at least six feet (about two arm lengths) from others who do not live with you.
  • Avoid crowds. The more people you are in contact with, the more likely you are to be exposed to COVID-19.

To learn more about National Minority Health Month and to receive updates on news and activities, sign up for OMH email updates and follow us on TwitterFacebook, and Instagram.

Visit the National Minority Health Month webpage to download and share this year’s logo.

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