International Nurses’ Day Unites Nurses Globally on May 12

International Nurses’ Day Unites Nurses Globally on May 12

Each year, National Nurses Week brings celebrations across the United States. But within that week is an important reminder of the work that nurses do across the globe, under varying conditions, with dramatically different equipment, but with the same steely determination to protect the health of the people they care for.

This year, International Nurses’ Day is celebrated on May 12, Florence Nightingale’s birthday. Nightingale, as many know, is considered an early healthcare innovator who founded modern nursing practices and helped shape nursing to such an extent that her influence remains to this day. Nightingale’s passion for aiding the ill and injured and keeping nursing practices focused on sanitation helped saves lives of those in her care and countless lives today.

The International Council of Nurses (ICN) sponsors the day and has designated this year’s theme as “Nurses: A Voice to Lead, Achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).” Nurses around the world can participate and unite their nursing voices by using the hashtags #VoiceToLead and #IND2017 in their social media posts.

The SDGs are a collection of more than 17 goals that impact nurses and the care they provide. The health inequities experienced by people around the world result from a mix of factors, but all impact the sustainable development issues facing nurses today. The issues range from ending poverty (that’s goal number one) to improving health and education and fighting climate change.

In honor of International Nurses’ Day, which debuted in 1965, the ICN is providing case studies from nurses across the globe—for instance there’s the story about addressing COPD in China to reducing the HIV stigma in Zambia.

For nurses who are interested in finding out more or adding their voice to the international nursing community, a Resources and Evidence toolkit is available for download.

According to the International Council of Nurses website, the organization “is a federation of more than 130 national nurses associations representing the millions of nurses worldwide. Operated by nurses and leading nursing internationally, ICN works to ensure quality care for all and sound health policies globally.”

May 10 Is National School Nurse Day

May 10 Is National School Nurse Day

Whether it’s a child who fell on the playground or a teen who is undergoing cancer treatment, school nurses see it all. As children are able to attend school with more and increasingly complex medical conditions, school nurses are on the front lines of monitoring, assisting, and advocating for schoolchildren across the nation.

So on May 10, National School Nurse Day, take a few moments to thank a school nurse in your life or in your community. The theme this year is “Healthy Nurse, Healthy Students” to highlight how much school nurses do to improve the health within their communities and how they are excellent and inspiring role models for the students and families who rely on their care.

The needs of our students are increasing daily and school nurses want to meet those needs so that students have the opportunity to succeed in the classroom to prepare for a healthy and successful future,” says Beth Mattey, MSN, RN, NCSN, and president of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) which created National School Nurse Day in 1972. “School nurses are on the front lines of population health.”

It’s no secret that kids who are healthy in body and mind will perform better in school and have more engaging and satisfying school experiences. “Schools have an energy and vitality about them where children and teens bring untapped potential,” says Mattey. A school nurse is there to offer medical care, but is often a comfort, a cheerleader, a family advocate, and a health care provider experienced with complex and diverse healthcare conditions and needs.

School nurses have long provided a hidden health care, often working as the only health care provider in the education setting,” says Mattey. “As the needs of our students are growing, the contribution school nurses bring to health AND education of students as a member of the health care team and the education team is increasingly being recognized and valued.”

According to Mattey, the American Academy of Pediatrics notes that the incidence of children with chronic health conditions are increasing. The Data Resource Center for Child and Adolescent Health says 27.3 percent of children ages 6 to 11 and 30.8 percent of teens age 12 to 17 have a chronic health condition. And for many children, their health struggles are compounded by additional factors. “Across the nation, fifteen million children live in poverty,” she says, “and almost 46 million children receive supplemental nutrition assistance. “

And with so many shifting factors, school nurses are seeing steep increases in issues like anxiety than did school nurses of a couple of generations ago. Mattey explains how almost 23 percent of children have been exposed to two or more adverse childhood events which can affect one’s physical and mental health. “School nurses report they spend at least 32 percent of their time addressing mental health needs of students,” says Mattey.

And as laying a foundation for a healthy life begins during the school years, Mattey says this is a great time to help influence healthy choices and behaviors. “For 14 years I worked with teens in our high school to reduce the use of tobacco,” she says. “We developed posters and shared the message across the state through music. We reduced tobacco use by 51 percent in our high school.” Other school nurses work with students in physical activity programs and programs to promote healthy eating.

It is incredibly fulfilling when we help a child and family manage a chronic health condition such as asthma, diabetes, or allergies and remain in school,” says Mattey. “School nurses want students healthy, safe, and ready to learn.”

And with school nurses in so many communities, their membership has a powerful base. NASN has 16,000 members in 50 affiliates and overseas who advocate for school children, their communities, and the national health of children.

On National School Nurse Day, acknowledging the complex and essential role school nurses play in both an educational and a community setting is important. “On May 10, school nurses will continue to care for students as they always do,” says Mattey. “This day perhaps, we will walk with an extra spring in our step knowing that the knowledge and expertise we bring to our students and community makes a difference in the lives of our students every day.”

Celebrate National Nurses Week

Celebrate National Nurses Week

Get ready to kick off National Nurses Week! This annual event to recognize the compassionate and critical work nurses perform and to celebrate the profession begins tomorrow, May 6 and lasts until May 12.

The week provides time to honor the role of nurses in their own lives and in the collective national landscape.

This year’s theme: Nursing: The Balance of Mind, Body, and Spirit reflects the American Nurses Association’s designation of 2017 as the Year of the Healthy Nurse. The theme points to the delicate and essential equilibrium that nurses must find to successfully thrive in such a distinctly unique profession.

National Nurses Week is marked throughout the nation in all kinds of settings—from healthcare settings to nursing schools.

Vanderbilt University’s School of Nursing Dean Linda Norman says the week offers a chance to celebrate nurses and to also take a look at where the profession is going.

Vanderbilt, which has both a medical center and a nursing school, has events including a blessing of the hands and a state of nursing address by the chief nursing officer. There are awards to recognize outstanding nurses and a dean’s diversity lecture that will examine how the nursing profession as a whole can meet the needs of a diverse population.

At the nursing school, where more than 900 students take classes, there will be several versions of birthday parties for Florence Nightingale whose birthday is marked every May 12.

We are having an ice cream social for the students just to say, ‘We’re glad you’ve chosen nursing and this is our way of celebrating nurses,’” says Norman.

Here are a few ideas to celebrate National Nurses Week either with colleagues, family, friends, or by yourself:

Have a party

Nurses deserve to have someone else take care of them, so having a reception at work or meeting for lunch with your nurse friends offers time to stop and celebrate.

Say Thanks

If you supervise other nurses, be sure to thank them for all they do. They are the front lines of patient care and perform superhuman feats each day.

Learn More

Spread the word about the ANA’s free webinar A Nurse’s Guide to Preventing Compassion Fatigue, Moral Distress, and Burnout” on May 10 at 1 pm EDT (registration closes on May 9 at 7 pm EDT).

Between May 12 and May 17, you may also view the free webinar recording of “Empathy 101: How to Care for Yourself While Emotionally Supporting Others,” offered by Nurse.com at http://ce.nurse.com/course/Web332 . The webinar features Kati Kleber, BSN, RN, CCRN.

As Norman says, the week also offers a time for nurses to consider the journey that brought them to where they are. Norman says she is frequently reminded of her own journey.

It is a time for us to reflect on the choice we made back when we were deciding on our profession,” she says. “To be able to try to meet the needs of others—that’s a privilege. To teach others how to do that—that’s an even bigger privilege.”

5 Steps to Get You Ready for the Job Hunt

5 Steps to Get You Ready for the Job Hunt

Are you tired of going to your job?

Nursing might be one of the most exciting and dynamic careers, but that doesn’t mean you are in the right role. With so many options available in the nursing field, there’s no reason to be stuck in a job you don’t like.

If you’re starting to think about finding a new place to work or even just changing roles in your current organization, it helps to plan ahead.

Here are five things to do now if you’re thinking of getting back in the job market.

1. Decide What You Want

It won’t do you any good if you just jump from one job to another without understanding why you are making the big move. Decide what’s most important to you. Is it a bigger salary? More benefits? A less pressured environment? Are you looking for more or less work hours? Or is your work environment abrasive and difficult? Once you know why you’re leaving and what you really want, you can move forward.

2. Polish Up

Get your resume ready. If you’ve been in your current role for a while, list all of your responsibilities, duties, successes, and accomplishments. Decide how you can show what you did rather than just tell what you did. Talk about a successful change you made at work and if it saved your team time or money. Did you work with a specific population and increase their health outcomes? Did you manage an increasingly larger staff? If you aren’t sure where to begin, hiring a pro will be a good investment. Make sure your LinkedIn profile is updated with a current photo (no selfies allowed!) and that your social media sites are professional.

3. Find Your Cheerleaders

You will need references, so think of the people who have worked with you successfully. Maybe you worked on a team, were the lead on an initiative, or even were active in charity work outside of your day-to-day job. You need to ask colleagues if they will act as a reference before you list them in any job application process,

4. Play Detective

Investigate the companies where you are applying for a job or where you would like to work. Find out about recent (or planned) major changes. You wouldn’t want to look for a shorter commute and find out that a facility is moving. Do they have a new leadership team of highly respected leaders? How is their financial history and do they have any recent layoffs? Google searches reveal lots of information. A thorough investigation will give you a good perspective on the place you could be going.

5. Network Your Tail Off

Job hunters can’t underestimate the importance of getting out there, making an impression, and adding to the professional and industry conversations. If you can’t get to networking events, being making well-placed, thoughtful comments on LinkedIn or Twitter. Do the best you can to connect with people, but not just for what they can give you. The best networkers are finding out how they can make positive and long-lasting contributions to the nursing industry. They are seeking ways to enhance their careers, of course, but also for ways they can add their talents. They know a solid network is multifaceted and will exist long after they find a dream job.

A well-planned approach to job hunting will save time and effort in the long run. Focusing on what you want, how you can get there, and what you have to offer to the larger profession is a great first step.

6 Ways to Build Relationships with Patients

6 Ways to Build Relationships with Patients

New nurse graduates have a lot on their plate. With diploma in hand, they can barely shout a celebratory “woo hoo” before passing the NCLEX becomes the next focus. But this early time in your nursing career is an especially important time to begin laying the foundation of the kind of nurse you want to be.

Nursing students often say connecting with patients is what makes their long days worthwhile. No matter what population you will be working with, finding a way to bridge the gap and connect with patients makes your job easier and builds confidence and satisfaction for your patients.

Here are a few ways to start building relationships—whether they last for hours or years—it makes a difference.

1. Introduce Yourself

Your patients have medical professionals coming in and out of their rooms all day long. Don’t take it personally if they don’t remember your name or when you first came in or even what you need to do. Tell them your name and what you will be doing. Let them know how long you’ll be taking care of them.

2. Be Present

With all the hectic happenings in a healthcare setting, nurses have to have eyes and ears open to everything. Sometimes that means when you are with a patient, you aren’t 100 percent focused on them. Making the effort to bring your attention to the patient in front of you helps. “Be present in the moment,” advises Pamela Chally, Dean Emeritus, Brooks College of Health, University of North Florida. “Even something nonverbal does a lot for being present. It can be a touch or eye contact,” she says.

3. Keep Them Updated

Let your patients know what to expect. If you know they’ll have a CAT scan later in the day, let them know the approximate time. If that time changes, pass that information along. They might have questions about what’s going on and why they need certain tests or procedures. Let them know or, if you don’t know all the details, find out for them.

4. Spend Some Time

This is the most difficult piece because time is one thing nurses don’t have to spare. But making the most of your time with a patient can help overcome the quantity of the time you can offer. You can’t sit in the room and chat the afternoon away, but you can ask them about their outside life. Talk about the latest baseball game, their scrapbooking habit, or what they like about their job.

5. Learn About Them

If they have family in the room, try to learn a little about them and about your patient as well. Be mindful if a family doesn’t want to talk, but also listen for small details that aren’t volatile. Hobbies, favorite places, favorite foods, or upcoming events they are looking forward to are all great ways to connect and will help break the ice.

6. Have Patience

In addition to their professional skill and their calm demeanor, nurses’ patience is legendary. But having patience isn’t always easy, and when you have patients who are scared, in pain, or just not particularly pleasant, it can be downright difficult. Watch the nurses around you to see what coping techniques they have developed to deal when tempers flare in your setting. Do they deflect with questions? Do they ignore the situation and continue on calmly or do they address it directly? What does your manager recommend when you encounter a situation that’s not easy? And find your own way of bringing yourself back to a calm place when things get tough.

7. Make It Personal

With so many people to care for, it’s not going to be easy to remember small details about everyone. But if you can remember your patient is especially nervous about blood draws, has very particular food preferences or issues, or is more modest than most (or not!), you can be prepared for those situations. Showing that you care about them as a person will help build a mutual trust.

Building relationships with patients, no matter what setting you see them in, has a ripple effect. You’ll make their stay or visit more pleasant, but you’ll also feel more satisfaction from having connected with them, too. And if your patient trusts you and feels like you are advocating for their interests, they are more likely to listen to what you say and ask questions when they don’t understand something.

Building a relationship with a patient can lead them on a path to better health overall and a better quality of life—what nurse doesn’t want that?

Nursing Students Gain Valuable Skills in Remote Areas

Nursing Students Gain Valuable Skills in Remote Areas

In hopes of gaining a breadth of experience, many nursing students immediately look for a job in a hospital setting upon graduation. But Judy Liesveld, associate professor at the University of New Mexico’s College of Nursing, encourages students to look past the typical offerings.

Working on a “Nurse Education, Practice, Quality and Retention-Bachelor of Science in Nursing Practicum” grant from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Liesveld runs a program in which selected nursing students from the University of New Mexico and San Juan College in Farmington, New Mexico, work twice a year (once in fall and once in early spring) in the Chinle Indian Health Service Unit on very rural Navajo Nation Reservation located in Arizona, three hours outside of Albuquerque.

In their two-week stay on the reservation, the students are immersed in an unfamiliar culture and with medically underserved people who need healthcare that runs the gamut from minor to serious. Students who want to return are able to complete a senior capstone in the following term.

When they are in this setting, they are in a very rural setting where it’s a totally different culture with a vulnerable population,” she says. “This totally helps to expand their world view. This is a robust, rich experience for them.”

And the experience the nursing students get in a short time rivals intense clinical experience in a larger healthcare setting, she says. Liesveld should know—her first job out of nursing school was working in Chinle Health Services.

The Chinle clinicals, as they are called, bring students through things like the emergency department, obstetrics, urgent care, and pediatrics. There are primary care clinics that the students participate in as well as home visits where many residents live without running water or heat in extremely remote areas where dirt roads are common. Even in living conditions that aren’t what they are used to, students see the human bonds that make the community what it is, Liesveld says. They see an incredibly close family structure and a culture that is powerful and strong.

The nursing students give presentations on health topics to different populations increasing both their presentation capabilities and their understanding of the different needs throughout a community.

They presented at a senior center on smokeless tobacco and at a middle school on self esteem,” she says. Through the presentations, the nursing students interacted with people and felt like they were making a difference.

The hope is students will love the experience and will work in rural settings,” says Liesveld. But if they never work in a rural setting again, she says the experience they gain on the reservation is one they will never forget and one that will offer them skills they will use throughout their careers.

They learn they have to be resourceful and they learn how to think on their feet,” says Liesveld. Students quickly develop authentic rapport with the residents and they use nursing skills they might not have a chance to use in other places. “It changes their world,” she says.

If they stay in the region, they are likely to work with a Native American population, so the exposure to their culture will give them a cultural competency that can only be gained by such an immersive experience.

And the ripple effect of what they have learned can lead to advocacy as well. Students begin to think about health policy on a national level and what that means for the country as a whole and these rural pockets of communities that exist across the nation.

When there is that kind of meshing of skills, understanding, and cultural exposure, nursing students, wherever they land after graduation, will have a broad view that will benefit them and their patients.