UConn School of Nursing Receives $3 Million Grant to Help Students with Disadvantaged Backgrounds Become Nurse Practitioners

UConn School of Nursing Receives $3 Million Grant to Help Students with Disadvantaged Backgrounds Become Nurse Practitioners

The UConn School of Nursing is pleased to announce it has received a nationally competitive grant award from the U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration for a groundbreaking program. The innovative “PATH to PCNP” Clinical-Academic Partnership aims to increase diversity among primary care providers in medically underserved communities in Connecticut.

The nearly $3 million grant will provide scholarship support to 24 undergraduate students with disadvantaged backgrounds each year for five years. Six students from each academic year – freshman, sophomore, junior, and senior – will receive scholarships starting in the 2020-21 academic year.

“The mission of the School of Nursing is to educate nursing scholars, clinicians, and leaders, with the goal of advancing the health of individuals, communities, and systems,” says School of Nursing Dean Deborah Chyun. “The funding provided through this innovative program for underrepresented students will enhance their ability to focus on their education and graduate with minimal debt, in the hopes that they will go on to serve the areas of our state that are most in need.”

The group of faculty members leading this initiative at the School of Nursing includes: Ivy Alexander, Ph.D., APRN, ANP-BC, FAANP, FAAN; Natalie Shook, Ph.D.; Marianne Snyder, Ph.D., MSN, RN; and Thomas Van Hoof, MD, EdD, FACP.

Despite efforts to recruit registered nurses with disadvantaged backgrounds to the School of Nursing’s primary care nurse practitioner (PCNP) master’s program, numbers of such students remain low, according to Alexander. In order to increase diversity among PCNPs, the School must first increase successful completion of the bachelor’s program among disadvantaged students, and without overwhelming debt.

The objective of “PATH to PCNP” (Provide Academic Transformational Help for disadvantaged nursing students to become Primary Care Nurse Practitioners) is to help such students graduate on time through a “fast track” undergraduate program. The partnership will: increase educational support for students with disadvantaged backgrounds; foster a sense of belonging and ability for positive self-care to reduce stress, anxiety and depression; and infuse primary care curriculum and experiences in medically underserved communities.

“Students participating in the ‘PATH to PCNP’ Program will have primary care experiences during their undergraduate nursing education and graduate ready to begin graduate school to become primary care nurse practitioners,” the faculty team says.

“PATH to PCNP” is a partnership between the UConn School of Nursing and Community Health Center Inc. Senior-level students in the program will complete a capstone clinical rotation at CHCI, gaining experience providing primary nursing care to patients with complex health issues in medically underserved communities. CHCI’s Chief Nursing Officer Mary Blankson, DNP, APRN, FNP-C, will lead the initiative at CHCI, which is one of the largest federally qualified health centers in the country.

The Health of a Nation

The Health of a Nation

The first quarter of 2020 has revealed, to many, the depth of the racial problem in American society. First, COVID-19, which has disproportionately impacted communities of color, revealed the inequities in the American health care and economic system. Then, the killings of three African Americans, Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor, and George Floyd, by white men, including police officers in two of the cases, restarted a conversation on racial violence and police brutality in America. All of this has led to a national discussion on the health of the American republic.

To provide some illumination on this important topic, we interviewed Dr. Stacie Craft DeFreitas, who has a PhD in Clinical Psychology from Duke University. Her interest in race, ethnicity, and academic achievement was sparked in high school when she participated in Kaleidoscope, a math and science enrichment program for African American students housed on the campus of Wake Forest University. Her work, African American Psychology, is a highly relevant work that covers many of the issues raised by the recent events in America. She is currently an Associate Professor of Psychology and the Assistant Chair of the Social Sciences department at the University of Houston-Downtown.

DeFreitas, what is your reading of the origins and purpose of the current Black Lives Matter movement and how do you place it in the historical context of black civic action in the United States?

The current Black Lives Matter movement stems from the murder of Trayvon Martin in 2012 when women of color began using the hashtag to bring awareness to such acts against people of color. Nearly 10 years later, the movement is still striving to protect black and brown people from such state sanctioned murder.  Black Lives Matter is one of the larger current movements pushing the United States towards the ideals that are penned in the Declaration of Independence and Constitution.  BLM is forging a place in history as an agent for change.

What motivated you to write the book African American Psychology and how is it relevant for understanding race in America today?

It seemed to me that there were not enough messages about the strengths of African Americans out there in the world. There was so much negative media and I wanted to realistically counter that. I wanted to tell more of the story of the African American community by focusing on the historical elements that have led to the current psychological state of African Americans as well as look at how the strengths can be used to help the community prosper. There are so many people that really need to read this book so that they can begin to get a better understanding of African Americans in this country. Many people assume that they know about Black people because of the media that they ingest, TV, movies, news, and music. Many people do not know that they often get a stereotypical view of African Americans and only see the lives of a small subset. African Americans are heterogeneous. There is so much diversity within this group that is often ignored. This book also helps to bring some of that out. It will help readers to understand that African Americans are strong and resilient people who have survived so much and often come out of the other side better off. But it will also help readers to understand that they are battling so much and that we should marvel in all of the progress that has been made despite the plethora of barriers. Perhaps readers will love and admire the African American community as I do once they have a better understanding of their lives, or at the very least reevaluate their own biases and stereotypes.

What was the most surprising thing you learned, as an African American woman and psychologist, about the psychology of African Americans during your research for the book?

This may not be surprising to others, but I learned more about all of the ways that the United States has worked to keep African Americans from prospering. I knew about some of it, but got a much better understanding of the events in Rosewood, lynchings, the Tulsa bombings, redlining, and other ways that citizens and businesses worked to keep African Americans from prospering. There was so much, I chose not to include much of it in the text as I assumed someone would say that I was being anti-American and would therefore discount the book. It amazes me that we sweep these things under the rug and imagine that since slavery, or at least since the Civil Rights Movement, the U.S. has only tried to support African Americans. That is clearly not true and continues to be untrue today. Doing nothing is often the same as doing harm.

Can you discuss the nature of structural racism in the U.S. and some of the ways it impacts the mental and physical health of African Americans? 

Structural racism is weaved into the fabric of the United States. It is inherent in its capitalist ideologies, laws, history, and culture. Racism impacts the mental and physical health of African Americans in so many ways. One very important way is through racism’s impact on where and how people live. African Americans are much more likely to live in impoverished neighborhoods as a result of the history of racism in this country and the current laws that do not protect or support them fully. Unfortunately, I cannot go into all of the racist practices that work to push Black people into segregated and often lower income neighborhoods, but there are many, and they continue to be practiced today. One example is crime free housing ordinances which allow landlords to evict or deny housing for any person who is suspected of a crime which effectively works to deny housing to people of color as a result of heightened, unjustified police surveillance among people of color, especially Black men. The neighborhood that one lives in impacts the schools that they attend, the quality of the restaurants that they are near, whether they live in a food desert, the recreational space available to them, and other factors that all impact mental and physical health.

Further, racism has created a system of mistrust between Black patients and their often non-Black health care providers. Black patients often do not trust these health care providers to really have their best interest at heart as result of a history of mistreatment. Because of this mistrust, they often avoid going to the doctor for as long as they can and they are less comfortable sharing all of their symptoms when they finally do go to the doctor. Doctors in turn do not trust their Black patients to carry out their prescribed orders and they often discount their experiences. This cycle leads to lower quality care for Black patients.

You talk about the need to embrace a more holistic view of mental health in the Black community that goes beyond the presence or absence of mental disorders. Can you discuss this point further?

It is really important that all people start considering a more holistic view of health in general. We create these false divisions between different aspects of health, but what makes us think that we need to separate our mind from our body? We have so much evidence that they are very connected and that what happens in our minds impacts our bodies and what happens in our bodies impacts our minds. For that reason, all people, Black people especially because of the number of stressors that they face, should really focus on taking care of the whole self, mentally, physically, and spiritually. Ideally, we would have more health care centers that take this integrated approach. One piece of evidence for this interconnection is the fact that Black people have relatively good mental health overall when we consider their typical life stressors, but often have poorer physical health. It could be that in an effort to preserve their mental health, Black people are harming their bodies. This goes beyond things like a tendency towards eating unhealthy comfort foods when a person is stressed. It appears that for many Black people, negative factors such as stress may not result in mental health problems like depression, but instead would result in physical manifestations such as high blood pressure. With a more holistic view of health, doctors could examine whether there are mental health factors (such as stress from experiences of discrimination) that are leading to physical problems (poor cardiovascular health). That type of treatment approach could help us to reduce health disparities. Further, I am a huge proponent of mental health treatment. I believe that people should get yearly mental health check-ups just like they get physical exams, but the African American community has a lot of stigma surrounding mental health.  An integrated approach would help remove this stigma if your mental health check-up is just a part of your regular health care practice.

What are some things about the African American community that members of the health care profession should be aware of in order to provide the best mental and physical health service to members of the community?

The most important thing for health care providers to do is to check their own biases and assumptions. Health care providers must do some soul searching. What do you really think about people of color? Do you expect that they will not follow the doctor’s orders, so why give them anyway? Do you make assumptions about how they live and what they understand without proper assessment? Do you truly listen to their concerns? Do you make an effort to build rapport with all patients equally so that they feel safe and cared for? Further, medical facilities need to start really looking at their practices and making sure that treatment of all patients is equitable. For example, hospitals should keep track of things such as how often patients are given pain medication based on ethnicity. There is an assumption that African Americans can handle more pain and therefore they are denied this medicine. Also, African Americans experiences can often be discounted by medical professions. One example of this is the high rate of deaths by African American women during childbirth. These deaths are often preventable and occur because health care providers may discount the complaints and concerns of African American women. I experienced this first hand and it resulted in the one of the scariest moments of my life. If the only time that health care providers interact with people of color is at work, this is a recipe for poor rapport and low quality care.

Can you discuss the nature of symbolic racism and the role it plays in the current racial dynamic in the U.S.?

Symbolic racism is a subtle form of racism in which people believe that racism is not real and that people of color have not progressed more in life due to their own deficiencies. This is one of the most damaging forms of racism because it is widespread and people can feel good about themselves for having an “American work ethic,” believing they have achieved their goals completely due to their own hard work. What they do not consider is the fact that often, they have had many people and situations help them along the way that people of color have not had.  European Americans are more likely than African Americans to have parents that went to college, have parents that own a home and can pass that home down to them, get inheritances from other family members, have teachers that look like them and have similar cultural values, live in a neighborhood that is middle class with access to healthy food and medical care, and see positive images of people who they can identify with in the media. All of these factors are aspects of structural racism and impact health, financial, and educational outcomes.  So those who harbor symbolic racism beliefs discount all these factors and the many more that impact the lives of African Americans. These are the same people who ask “well what did he do” when an unarmed Black man is shot by the police because they cannot fathom that the murder could be a result of a system of racism and no fault of the murdered Black man. Such ideas are inherent in those who assume that the Black Lives Matter movement suggests that other people don’t matter. Unfortunately, we have to state that Black lives matter even when WE know that all lives matter; it is just that the United States does not seem to know. For that reason, they need to be reminded, Black lives matter.

Can you discuss color-blind racism and how it impacts the psychology of African Americans?

Color-blind racism is when a person says that they don’t see color so they cannot possibly be racist. This is problematic first of all because it is not true. Perhaps a person may not have biases against other people due to their race or ethnicity, but unless you have some type of disability, you will determine (or attempt to determine) an individual’s race or ethnicity when interacting with them. This is part of being human. We categorize people into ethnicity, gender, age, etc. when we first see them. It is a quick way to get information about who a person is and how you should interact with them. What we must pay attention to is the fact that we often do treat people of different ethnic groups differently, even when we think that we do not. This is the major problem. One important way that color blind racism may sneak into the world of health care providers is through mentorship. When you think of who you have mentored or been mentored by, how often has a good mentoring relationship been with someone of a different ethnic background? Usually it is not. This is because we assume that we are color blind, but biases and expectations often cause us to connect with those who we believe are like us. People may reach out to support others who they can identify with, but if one is being color blind, they can pretend that ethnicity has nothing to do with it, when often, it does. They can say, “well she reminds me so much of myself when I started” and deny the fact that they had biases about the Black nurse and therefore did not reach out to support her. Color-blind racism is also problematic because by trying to discount ethnicity, people are ignoring important aspects of who a person is and often this will result in a poor interaction. This can be particularly problematic for a health care worker who is unwilling to ask the questions that they need to in order to better understand a coworker or patient and is instead just acting on their assumptions.

In your book, you discuss some of the gender based ways that Black men and women react to the experience of racism in the U.S. Can you describe some of these responses?

My text discusses John Henryism—when referring to Black males—and Sojourner Syndrome—for African American women—as coping mechanisms for overcoming the barriers that racism creates to their success. Both ideologies suggest that Black people must work harder to achieve what European Americans are able to achieve in this country as a result of racism. Though these coping mechanisms may result in financial, career, or educational success, they often take a toll on the individual’s physical health through negative impacts on the cardiovascular system. The individual is often under constant stress as they try to overcompensate for the racial barriers that are placed in their way.  Another interesting idea that has been put forth about Black women is the Strong Black Woman ideology which suggests that Black women often feel that they must be independent, resilient, and self-sufficient to the point that they often do not ask for help when needed and are ashamed to demonstrate weakness. They have often taken on the more of the burden of supporting their families than Black men because Black men face so many more racial barriers than they do. The Strong Black Woman ideology often is linked with poorer mental health as these women do not seek out support when they are struggling.

What is one area of ongoing research into the psychology of African Americans that you feel excited about and why?

I am excited about any research that works towards improving the outcomes of African Americans across the board. Right now, I am doing work examining mental health stigma, which is negative beliefs about individuals who have a mental health disorder or about treatment of mental health disorders. Mental health stigma is relatively high in the African American community. I am very interested in research that focuses on the best ways to reduce this stigma because it has such a profound impact on treatment. If there is less stigma, more African Americans would be willing to seek mental health treatment. Then the next step for research would be making sure that there is effective and available treatment.

June 19 Recognizes World Sickle Cell Day

June 19 Recognizes World Sickle Cell Day

Today is World Sickle Cell Day—a day designed to spread awareness and understanding of sickle cell disease–an often painful inherited blood disorder.

The Sickle Cell Disease Association of America (SCDAA) is marking the 10th year of this recognition. There is no cure for sickle cell disease right now, although some patients have had success with various treatments including hydroxyurea treatment and bone marrow treatment.

According to SCDAA, complications from sickle cell disease (SCD) happen when a normal blood flow is reduced or prevented from flowing normally throughout the body. With SCD, some normally round red blood cells become crescent shaped (sickle shaped) and because of that change, can no longer flow through small blood vessels. These misshapen cells can actually cause a blockage, thereby reducing a normal blood flow that tissues need to stay healthy and to keep the body functioning properly. A common result is that reduced blood flow damages tissues and can lead to debilitating pain.

Blood cells with sickle cells don’t live as long in the body (about 16 days vs. 120 days for normal cells according to the SCDAA), so that rapid turnover can lead to the myriad complications that come with a sickle cell diagnosis including anemia and jaundice. Because SCD affects nearly every organ in the body, systemic complications can involve major systems including the lungs and kidneys. And the damage can also leave the body less able to fight off and control infections.

Current treatments are often a reaction to the complications, although some, like a preventative antibiotic and vaccinations in children, can help prevent complications from beginning. Patients may find various combinations of blood transfusions, pain management, antibiotics, breathing treatments, proper vaccinations, and other medications.

As with other chronic conditions, people with SCD have to take extra care with their own health. Because people are born with sickle cell disease, the disorder is a lifelong condition and can be especially challenging for children to cope with. Generally, a hematologist will manage the condition and any treatments. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, staying well-hydrated is especially important as is good nutrition and rest. Anyone with sickle cell disease can stay active to help overall health, but just be especially aware of fatigue and fluctuations in body temperature—moderation is the best approach.

According to the CDC, sickle cell disease affects about 100,000 people in the United States with a greater diagnosis rate in minority populations. Sickle cell disease happens in approximately 1 out of every 365 Black or African-American births and 1 out of every 16,300 Hispanic-American births.

More common is being diagnosed as a carrier of the sickle cell trait (SCT) which is not sickle cell disease. A carrier of SCT has one copy of the defective gene that can cause sickle cell disease (you need two copies to have the disease).

For those with SCD, finding a provider who is familiar with the disease and with cutting-edge treatment is important. Research information, through organizations such as the Foundation for Sickle Cell Disease Research is essential. But the emotional struggle of coping with a complex, chronic, and invisible disease that can have such disruption in someone’s life is big. Getting the emotional and social support of a caring community is going to make a difference in developing coping skills and getting through rough times.

If you know someone who is impacted by sickle cell disease in any way, today makes it easier to spread the word, provide education, and let them know they aren’t alone.

A Plea to All Organizations, Colleges, Universities, and Schools of Nursing

A Plea to All Organizations, Colleges, Universities, and Schools of Nursing

I woke up this morning thinking about how some organizations who employ nurses, universities, and schools in general are making statements about diversity and inclusion. Some are including George Floyd’s name in these statements. I also thought about how there are many schools who are not making open statements about their heartfelt sentiments to the community, students, or faculty regarding the recent events. Within these organizations many nurses and faculty members are also working as frontline staff during the COVID-19 pandemic. In addition, to the current COVID 19 pandemic, African Americans have continued to have mental anguish existing due to continued racial inequalities existing and these truths being ignored by others.

Earlier this month, the American Nurses Association sent out an open statement about the social and racial injustices still existing and acknowledging how this goes against our dedication to nursing practice. I applaud this acknowledgement as it shows advancement of improving racial inequalities in an open forum.

Today, I am calling out organizations who employ nurses, schools of nursing, and universities worldwide to make a statement about racial inequalities existing and how they will address them in their organizations. It is not enough to say “I do not see color or it’s getting better”. In the recent months this has proven not to be the case. Those statements are not an accurate depiction of the truth as this dismisses those who are racially profiled against and judged based on the color of their skin.

Everything You Need to Know About Telehealth

Everything You Need to Know About Telehealth

If you hadn’t heard of telehealth before the coronavirus pandemic, you probably know about it now. Medical providers are trying to move as many of their appointments to virtual means as they can. While telehealth options have been around for years, this is the first time it’s been implemented on such a wide scale. Since many people want to know exactly what telehealth is and how it works, we answer all your telehealth FAQs. Ever wonder about security concerns and how providers diagnose symptoms like the coronavirus via video call? We’ve got you covered.

What types of telehealth are available?

There are three main types of telehealth interactions that you might have with your provider. They are:

  1. Live consultations, which are usually held over video conferencing.
  2. Asynchronous messaging, where you send your provider text or pictures and they respond as they are able.
  3. Remote monitoring, when the patient uses at-home devices to measure vitals such as blood glucose and then sends them to a provider for an examination.

A telehealth appointment usually refers to the first option, i.e. scheduling a video call with your provider (white lab coats and nursing scrubs not required), but your telehealth interactions will usually span all three categories.

Is telehealth secure?

Given all the privacy concerns surrounding technology, many people are understandably concerned about the security of their virtual visits. The security will vary depending on the service(s) that your provider uses. If your doctor is part of a larger hospital network, they may contract with a major telehealth provider or use a proprietary system, which should be more secure. Smaller practices may use more general-purpose virtual meeting software, such as Skype, which usually have looser privacy restrictions. Investigate the privacy policies of the services that your provider asks you to use, and you can also ask your provider about implementing security features such as encrypted data transmission.

Is telehealth covered by insurance?

This depends on your insurance, your provider, and the telehealth system they use. In general, telehealth services provided directly by a doctor or a hospital are more likely to be covered, though not always. Even if the virtual visit is covered by insurance, patients may still have a co-pay or another charge. If it’s not covered, patients can choose to pay out of pocket for the entire visit. Common per visit fees range from $50 to $80, while other platforms charge an annual membership fee.  If you’re on Medicare or Medicaid, thanks to some recent changes, Medicare will cover telehealth services and Medicare Advantage plans may waive or reduce cost-sharing.

How can I find a telehealth provider?

If you already have a provider, check with them first to see if they have existing telehealth or upcoming telehealth options due to coronavirus. Depending on what insurance you have, you might also be able to filter your provider search on the insurance portal to only show providers that provide telehealth options. Some telehealth service websites, such as Teladoc Health and MD Live, will let you search for providers on their website. If you find doctors via the latter route, you’ll need to contact their offices to see if they accept your insurance before you make an appointment.

What are some advantages of telehealth?

Telehealth offers several benefits over regular appointments. For one, it protects both patients and providers from the transmission of germs (very important in the age of coronavirus). It also eliminates the need to secure transportation and elder or child care. Plus, it reduces the time spent in waiting rooms and on the road. Telehealth appointments save patients and providers money as well as time. They also give providers more flexibility to set their own schedules and schedule appointments when it’s most convenient for everybody involved.

What are some disadvantages of telehealth?

However, telehealth does have some drawbacks. Obviously, some visits simply need to be completed in person. Patients can’t just grab a stethoscope and listen to their own vitals. There can also be issues of access, as not everyone has a smartphone or laptop and a stable internet connection, which are necessary for video consultations. The inconsistency of insurance coverage for patients and reimbursement for providers can also cause headaches and complicate what would ordinarily be a simple visit.

Can I get a prescription via a telehealth appointment?

Yes, doctors can use telehealth to write or renew prescriptions. If you just need a refill on an existing prescription, you might be able to request it by messaging your doctor and eliminating the need to book and pay for an appointment. If it’s a new prescription, or you’re not sure what medication you need, you’ll probably need to book a quick appointment for a diagnosis. They’ll still have to call in the prescription at a local pharmacy, so you’ll have to venture out to pick it up or arrange to get it delivered.

Can coronavirus be diagnosed via a telehealth appointment?

Because the symptoms can vary so widely from patient to patient, and also overlap somewhat with those of other common infectious diseases (including the flu), the only way to confirm that you definitely have coronavirus is to get a test that involves taking a swab in person. However, you can use a telehealth appointment to discuss your symptoms with your doctors and determine whether you need a test or if you’re just suffering from allergies. In fact, many hospitals have set up a coronavirus hotline specifically for this purpose. Your doctors can also talk you through quarantine best practices and how to keep those around you safe.

If you need to talk to your doctor right now, odds are that you’ll be making your visit virtually via telehealth services. Keep these FAQs in mind to make sure that your visit is covered by insurance and your privacy is secure. Welcome to the future of medicine!

9 Benefits of Remote Health Care

9 Benefits of Remote Health Care

Telehealth has slowly been making inroads over the past couple of decades, and the spread of the coronavirus pandemic has only escalated its adoption. Doctors have been told to hold every visit possible remotely in order to cut down on the chances of spreading the virus between patients and medical providers.

While in-person doctor’s visits have been the standard for generations, telehealth offers several benefits that in-person appointments simply can’t match. In fact, telehealth can reduce costs and barriers to access for both doctors and patients. If you’re new to the idea of telehealth, here are nine benefits that you need to know about remote health care.

For Patients

1. You don’t have to worry about transportation.

Getting to and from the doctor’s office can be a large barrier. Even people with reliable vehicles have to make arrangements with their households to use the car, as well as taking both travel time and gas into account. Patients who use public transportation or ride-sharing options have to account for many more unknowns, including unreliable transit schedules and routes that may not take them directly to the doctor’s office. By letting you stay in your home, telehealth visits make it easier to talk to your doctor and increase access to care.

2. You don’t have to find elder or child care.

For adults serving as primary caregivers, getting away from the house can be tough, even if they’re not officially employed. In that case, they have to arrange for their partner to stay home, or if that’s not possible, find or hire other people to watch their children or parents while they go to the doctor. This added expense and hassle serves as a barrier that keeps people from getting to the doctor’s office. Remote health appointments remove the need to find elder or child care for dependents, making it easier to virtually visit the doctor.

3. You’ll waste less time.

Time is a major consideration in scheduling and attending doctor’s appointments. You have to factor in not only the length of the appointment itself, but also transportation time and time spent in the waiting room. Between everything, many patients must sacrifice two or three hours of their day just to talk with their doctor for 15 minutes (or less!). Some people simply can’t get that much time off of work, which makes them reluctant to visit the doctor. Remote appointments eliminate transportation time and significantly reduce delays as well. No more wasting an hour in the waiting room while the minutes tick past your appointed time.

4. It reduces your chances of catching an illness.

We’ve all had the experience of sitting in a waiting room during cold and flu season, listening to other patients around us coughing and coughing and coughing. Simply due to the concentration of sick people, in-person doctor’s offices increase the odds of spreading germs. Plus, if you’re already visiting the doctor because you’re sick, your compromised immune system can make you more vulnerable to picking up more germs. Taking appointments from the comfort of your own home keeps you safe and prevents you from spreading any potentially contagious illness to other people.

5. It’s increasingly covered by insurance.

More and more insurance companies are covering telehealth visits, and as the cascading effects of coronavirus encourage more processes to move online, this trend will only continue in the future. While once considered a luxury, remote doctor visits will soon become as mundane as visiting a typical office for both you and your insurance company.

For Providers

6. You can see more patients.

Because of the increased efficiencies and reduced downtime between appointments, telehealth systems allow you to see more patients that you otherwise would not. Some physicians also use the time they would have spent commuting to extend their office hours, letting them see even more patients. For example, some patients who can’t get off work during the day might be able to hop on a call with you at night for half an hour. (And none of them will know if you’re wearing pajama pants under your white lab coat.)

7. You don’t have to leave your house.

Many of the same benefits that apply to patients are also a boon to physicians. Staying at home eliminates health care providers’ commutes, which saves time and money that they can use to see more patients. Telehealth doesn’t just limit patients’ exposure to germs. It also limits physicians’ exposure, which keeps them healthy and eliminates the chance that they might carry germs between patients. Finally, telehealth visits can ease the burden on physicians and their families who are also caring for children or relatives at home.

8. It reduces costs.

By increasing the number of patients and decreasing overhead expenses, telehealth visits save money. These savings are especially important for physicians who own their own practices instead of working for a big hospital. While you might need to initially invest in setting up or subscribing to a secure telehealth system, remote visits will quickly pay for themselves as they become more popular. In fact, telehealth might actually open new opportunities to bill for activities that were previously uncompensated, such as follow up phone calls.

9. It improves patient engagement and reduces no-shows.

A doctor’s primary goal is to improve patient outcomes, and telehealth can accomplish this on several levels. Unfortunately, the patients most in need of doctor visits are often the ones who struggle the most with getting time off work, finding elder or child care and securing reliable transportation to and from the doctor’s office. Telehealth can help break down these barriers and result in a wide variety of benefits like reducing no-shows and diverting unnecessary visits to the ER. Ultimately, all these benefits ease the strain on the whole health care system.

Now, don’t hang up your nursing scrubs quite yet. There will always be a need for in-person doctors’ visits. But incorporating a telehealth option into your practice can benefit both you and your patients greatly.