Men in Nursing: Where Are We Now?

Men in Nursing: Where Are We Now?

For more than a century, nursing has been thought of as the domain of women. But that has fluctuated over the last few centuries. Men actually dominated nursing through the mid-19th century. During the Industrial Revolution, men began leaving nursing for factory jobs. Florence Nightingale led the advancement of women in nursing, targeting upper and middle class women for nurse training. In fact, men were not allowed to serve in the Army Nurse Corps during World Wars I and II. Today, as workplaces evolve, more men are entering the profession again amidst a nursing shortage.

Entering Nursing

About 13% of nurses in the U.S. today are men, compared with 2% in 1960, according to the Washington Center for Equitable Growth. However, in the high-paying specialty of nurse anesthetist, there is an equal number of men and women.

The United States is leading the way in the increase in the number of male nurses. While the U.S. rate of men in nursing was not much higher than in Switzerland and Brazil in 1970, it rose rapidly over the next several decades and far surpassed these countries in addition to Portugal and Puerto Rico.

The rise of men in nursing is due in part to a shift in available jobs, especially as traditionally male-dominated jobs in manufacturing jobs like automakers have been taken over by automation or moved overseas for cheaper labor. A recent study published in the journal Social Science Research reviewed eight years of Census data. The study found that of men who had worked in male-dominated industries and then became unemployed, 14% decided to enter industries dominated by women, such as nursing. Eighty-four percent of men who didn’t lose jobs moved onto traditionally female jobs. Unemployed men who got jobs in female industries received a pay increase of 3.80% when making the move.

Where the Jobs Are

Another reason propelling more men into nursing is a shortage of nurses. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), employment for registered nurses will grow 12% between 2018 and 2028, much quicker than the average of other professions. There will be a need for 3.19 million nurses by 2024.

California is expected to have the highest shortage of nurses, and Alaska will have the most job vacancies. Other states that will face shortages of nurses in the next few years include Texas, New Jersey, South Carolina, Georgia, and South Dakota.

One driver of the need for more nurses is the growth of the aging population, who will require more medical care. Job growth is expected in long-term care facilities, especially for the care of stroke and Alzheimer’s patients. The need for nurses treating patients at home or in retirement communities will continue to grow. The rise in chronic conditions such as diabetes and obesity also means more nurses will be needed.

Pay and Training

The median annual wage for registered nurses was $71,730 in 2018, according to the BLS. The lowest 10% earned less than $50,800, and the highest 10% earned more than $106,530. Those working for the government and hospitals earned the most.

But like many other professions, men are outpacing women in pay. Male RNs make an average of $5,000 more per year than their female counterparts, according to a study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association. This salary gap hasn’t improved since the first year the salary survey was done in 1988. The difference in pay ranges from $7,678 per year for ambulatory care to $3,873 for work in hospitals. The largest gap, $17,290 for nurse anesthetists, may explain why so many men enter that specialty.

The researchers note that increasing transparency in how much employees are paid could help narrow the gap. In addition, part of the pay gap may be due to women taking more time out of the workforce for raising their children. FiscalTiger.com suggests that offering adequate leave to both mothers and fathers after the birth of a child could have a role in making pay more equitable.

The Washington Center for Equitable Growth’s report suggests that the amount of formal training required to become a registered nurse may bring men into nursing from other occupations later in their careers. The minimum training for registered nurses is an Associate Degree in Nursing. Increasingly, employers are demanding more education, however. That includes earning a Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) degree. RNs in the  U.S. military must have a BSN, and the Veteran’s Administration, which employs the most RNs in the country, requires a BSN for promotion.

Finding Support

While men are still a minority in nursing, various programs offer support and networking. The American Association for Men in Nursing was founded in 1971 but shuttered in a few years. In 1980 it was reformed and now has thousands of members. It encourages men of all ages to become nurses and supports their professional growth.

Some nursing schools also have groups to support male nursing students. New York University, for example, has Men Entering Nursing (MEN), open to all nursing students at the Rory Meyers College of Nursing to discuss the concerns and perceptions that affect men and what it means to be a male in the field of nursing.

What Nurses Need to Know: Dangerous Symptoms of the Job

What Nurses Need to Know: Dangerous Symptoms of the Job

Nurses need to be prepared for every eventuality in patient care: they welcome life into the world, and hold patients’ hands as their lives come to an end. The core job duties are physically, emotionally, and spiritually taxing — and sometimes dangerous — so it’s no surprise that nurses experience burnout at an alarming rate.

In fact, the National Nursing Engagement Report for 2019 found that 15.6% of all nurses were feeling burned out at the time of reporting, with 41% of nurses who reported themselves as feeling unengaged also reporting feeling burned out. But many nurses also know they can’t leave — or even take time off — because the nursing shortage is so critical that every hour counts.

We’ve written before about how to combat nurse burnout, but it’s just as important to recognize the dangerous signs of burnout when it starts.

What Are the Signs of Burnout?

Between the long hours, the demands of the job, and just being human, most nurses will experience either the signs of burnout or full Burnout Syndrome (BOS) at some point during their careers. As the National Nursing Engagement Report showed, even fully-engaged nurses report these symptoms. The first step to combating BOS is to recognize the symptoms.

Perhaps the first sign and highest predictor of burnout is emotional exhaustion. Nurses know what it’s like to be tired, but emotional exhaustion leaves you feeling completely drained as a result of the stress of your job. In addition to feeling fatigued in every way, people who are emotionally exhausted often feel like they’ve lost control of their lives — they often report feeling trapped in their situation, whether it’s at work or in an outside relationship.

Another sign of burnout is depersonalization. When you become so exhausted that you have to detach from your surroundings to survive, then you are burnt out. Your outlook may be negative or even calloused, and it can express itself in unprofessional comments directed at colleagues, feeling nothing when a patient dies, or even blaming patients for their problems.

The final major predictor of burnout is a reduced feeling of personal accomplishment. You may not feel that you’re a good nurse or that you make any difference at all in patients’ lives. Nurses working in high-intensity settings, like the ICU or emergency room, may experience this more often as they receive a greater proportion of cases where little can be done for the patient.

Why Burnout is Dangerous for Nurses and Patients

Burnout is more than having a bad day; it’s an impaired outlook on nursing and life in general. Experiencing burnout doesn’t mean you don’t love your job, nor does it mean that you aren’t good at what you do. In fact, this reality makes it even more difficult for nurses who experience burnout because leaving is just another impossible choice.

At the same time, burnout is as dangerous for nurses as it is for their patients. A nurse in the throes of BOS is both less likely to have life satisfaction and more likely to provide a poorer standard of patient care. In a study published in Research in Nursing & Health, researchers explored the correlation between the quality of care and nurse burnout among 53,846 nurses from six countries. They found a strong correlation between higher levels of burnout and nurse-rated quality of care.

In other words, burnout can become a self-fulfilling prophecy. Burnout can result in lower standards of patient care, which further informs the reduced feelings of personal accomplishment. As nurses make mistakes, they feel even lower job satisfaction and an even greater intensity of burnout, which goes around again to manifest itself once again in patient care.

How Nurses and Nursing Leaders Can Combat Burnout

Nurses are caught between a rock and a hard place — the nature of the job is stressful, but if you love what you do, you can’t quit. Although almost all nurses will go through burnout at some point, there are things that both practitioners and health care organizations can do to stave it off and help re-engage burned-out nurses.

Education is one of the critical ways that nurses can empower themselves and avoid burnout. Pursuing further education can renew your passion for what you do and help you overcome roadblocks. It also puts you in a better position to provide the latest evidence-based care to patients, which correlates to better patient outcomes and increased job satisfaction.

Nursing leaders and administrators also have a strategic role to play, as the environment in which nurses practice needs to be a supportive one. Creating a positive work environment that limits unnecessary stress and allows nurses to care for themselves and recharge can do wonders in both reducing burnout and igniting engagement.

Those same leaders and administrators can also take notes from other industries’ workplace safety practices. You can’t just say you have a safety culture, you need to commit to it by formalizing the ways in which you intend to create and maintain the culture and creating avenues to accept employee input.

There’s Always More Work to Do to Prevent Burnout

Nurses can’t get rid of the high-stress, high-stakes environments they work in. They can’t wave a magic wand and save every patient no matter how severe their condition, and they can’t stop feeling to cope.

In other words, burnout is a given part of being a nurse. While these feelings are normal, nurses also need support in preventing the bad (and downright dangerous) days from outweighing the good ones. Nurses and administrators can and must work together to prevent burnout — and while the challenge is a significant one, it is achievable if we all listen to each other.