ACA Loss Will Negatively Affect Health Care Worker Experience

ACA Loss Will Negatively Affect Health Care Worker Experience

Hospitals will face a major dilemma if the current federal administration repeals the Affordable Care Act (ACA) without a suitable replacement. The ACA offers millions of Americans affordable health insurance, and hospitals have seen their revenues, and their quality of care, rise as those newly insured citizens access their services. If the ACA goes away, those health care patients and their accompanying insurance payments disappear, putting even more stress on today’s health care labor force. With profit decline comes employee decline, both in number and quality. This will first and foremost affect nursing staff, putting some out of work and others in-over-their-heads.

An Uncertain Health Care Future

Before enactment of the ACA, existing law required (and still requires) that health care facilities provide “stabilizing care” to any person who requests services, regardless of their ability to pay. Medicaid covered these costs. Without ACA coverage, many patients will be forced back to receiving only the substandard “stabilizing care,” and will not receive the services they need to regain their health.

In that circumstance, the medical facility will be forced to balance the volume of unsubsidized, stabilizing care offered against the revenues generated by paying patients, cost reductions, or staff workload increases. If they offer excessive unsubsidized care, they risk declining income levels, staff numbers and possible bankruptcy. If they provide too little, they risk losing their Medicaid/Medicare funding. In both cases, the facility, its staff, and America’s uninsured patients will suffer.

Unpaid Care Is Expensive for the Medical Office …

Every medical consultation generates a series of cost-creating actions, from those of the scheduling secretary to the attending medical professional, and all the way through to the deposits made by the final billing clerk. According to the American Hospital Association, hospitals provided $35.7 billion in uncompensated care to their patients in 2015 alone. When a hospital absorbs these losses, it is also forced to reduce the services it can afford to provide.

Consequently, it is not unheard of for doctors to reduce the size of their bills by limiting the services they provide or the number of recommendations they make, based on their perception of what the patient can afford. Other studies confirm that uninsured patients are checked into a hospital for shorter stays, and they are offered fewer interventions for their condition. For the health professionals, these painful decisions are in direct conflict with their oath to provide the best care possible for every patient.

… And Hard on the Staff

One group of hospital workers that will certainly absorb a significant percentage of additional work due to funding cuts are the nurses. Reduced funding often leads to reduced staff numbers; remaining staff end up working longer, harder shifts, with more responsibility and less break time. And nursing is already a challenging job, with a high demand for significant physical labor that also takes an emotional toll. In fact, between 2002 and 2012, nurses have reported the highest stress levels of all health care professionals.

Additionally, long hours may not allow nurses to get the sleep they need. Inefficient sleep has been associated with a deficit in performance, caused by cognitive problems, mood alterations, reduced motivation, increased safety risk, and physiological changes. These effects only get worse with total sleep deprivation, common among nurses who work consecutive shifts.

Additional Stress Factors

Research reveals that the changes in the nursing profession in particular and the health care system in general, contribute significantly to the problem:

  • Sophisticated technology offers immense benefits but adds additional layers of responsibility on already overloaded schedules;
  • Burnout is common, too. Protocols can change as resources ebb; nurses are compelled to follow evolving practices without the opportunity to add input regarding their patient’s care. A 2012 study published by the Canadian Federation of Nurses Unions found high levels of burnout correlated to lower ratings for quality of care.
  • Reduced staff numbers also drive nurses to work even when they are sick. Many choose to potentially infect their patients rather than leave their colleagues unsupported on shift.

The reality for America is that, before the ACA, unpaid hospital bills were often eventually born by other elements of the system, including taxpayers and patients who incurred higher medical care costs. Repealing it won’t save the country money, but instead will add extra stress to the system and further erode the health of millions of its citizens.

Can You Beat Your Family History of Heart Disease?

Can You Beat Your Family History of Heart Disease?

Of all the risk factors for heart disease, the areas you have no control over are often the ones that are especially troublesome. While you can make inroads to a healthier diet, more activity and exercise, reducing stress, and even taking appropriate medications, it often feels like there’s nothing you can do to change your family’s track record of heart disease.

 

As February is American Heart Month, now is a great time to take stock of your own heart health. Knowing that your family carries a higher risk for heart disease is actually a great motivator to keep your own heart as healthy as possible. In many cases, if you ramp up your efforts to control what you can, you can negate some of your family’s health lineage.

 

Can you change your family’s past? No – if you had a father and three aunts who died from heart disease in their 40s, you need to take that very seriously. But it doesn’t mean you will take the same path.

 

How can you beat your genetics?

 

Know Your History

 

The American Heart Association recommends gathering as much family history as you possibly can. If you are at least able to start with members of your immediate family, that will help you assess your risk.

 

Look for family members with a history of heart attacks, strokes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, or congestive heart failure. Find out how old family members were when they were diagnosed and how old they were if they died from the disease. And try to notice any patterns – is the predominant problem heart attack or stroke?

 

Accept (But Don’t Give Into) Your Genes

 

There is virtually no way to change your genetic makeup. But if you carry an elevated risk, it can make you feel unsure of what’s to come. So while you can’t change your genetic cards, you can change how you live your life.

 

A lifestyle that is heart-healthy, heart-friendly, and heart-supportive can contribute greatly to your overall heart health and start to bring your elevated risk into a more normal range.

 

Talk with Your Team

 

Talk to your healthcare providers to make sure you are getting all the tests you need to uncover any early indicators of heart disease. Discuss medications and other therapies that can lower your blood pressure and your cholesterol and even get things like triglycerides into normal range.

 

Some minority populations are more predisposed to heart disease (including African Americans and Hispanics), so go over some of those risk factors. And have a discussion about any other conditions you may have that could put you at a higher risk including diabetes, depression, and even psoriatic arthritis.

 

Make Heart Health a Priority

 

No one else is going to put your heart health first, so that’s going to be up to you. Put caring for your heart at the top of your to-do list. That means taking a look at obvious things like your eating habits, your weight, your blood pressure and cholesterol numbers. But it also means making sure you get enough sleep (lack of sleep raises your risk of heart disease over time) and making sure you take the time for pleasure.

 

Loneliness also contributes to declining heart health, so develop a rich social life and figure out exactly what that looks like for you. Some people want three parties every weekend and others are happiest having dinner with best friends every couple of weeks or a favorite book club every week.

No matter what story your family health patterns reveal, it doesn’t mean that’s your destiny. With some changes and lots of diligence and close observation, you can keep you heart healthy and strong.

How to Show a Loved One With Cancer You’re Thinking of Them This Holiday Season

How to Show a Loved One With Cancer You’re Thinking of Them This Holiday Season

The holiday season always reminds us how hard it is to shop for certain people. Whether you’re roaming around Target or scanning page after page on Amazon, the same questions cross your mind. “Oh god, what was that awful band Uncle Bill loves?” Or “Your sister’s favorite color is purple, right?” What’s even harder than shopping for the not so close friend or family member is finding the perfect gift for someone suffering from a major illness. You want to help any way you can. You want to make the person feel better, hoping your gift will somehow tell the cancer to go away. As an 11-year survivor of a difficult cancer with no cure, called mesothelioma, I’d like to share my most memorable gifts and gestures I received during my battle with cancer. Hopefully, my personal stories and suggestions provide guidance to anyone struggling to find that perfect gift!

1. Gear the gift towards the individual, not the illness.

Try to distract the person of their illness, even if it’s for a brief time. Maybe you grew up together and have a bunch of pictures from your childhood. Make up a scrapbook filled with silly pictures, fond memories, and a few stories of your favorite times together! It’ll be sure to put a smile on the person’s face and get their mind off their illness.

Gift cards were also a huge help. I had friends who gave grocery store gift cards and offered to take me shopping–anything to lighten the load was extremely impactful. The people I used to work with all pitched in and sent me a gift card to Nordstrom and said, “We know you feel terrible. Go shopping, It’ll make you feel better.” I did just that and guess what, I did feel better! It made me feel normal just knowing that they thought of me, and it wasn’t cancer-related. To this day I still keep in touch with an old client who paid my car payment for two months. Not having to worry about where the money came from made life that much easier during a really stressful time, not just for me but my husband as well.

Gifting time to friends undergoing cancer treatment to do their holiday shopping, run errands, wrap their gifts, decorate their home (e.g., Christmas tree, lights) is very much appreciated, says Sandra L. San Miguel, MS, program director of the Center to Reduce Cancer Health Disparities at the National Cancer Institute.

2. Avoid food-like gift baskets.

To be honest, I didn’t use anything out of those giant snack-filled gift baskets.It’s a nice gesture, and extremely sweet, but I wasn’t able to eat any of the food because I was so sick. The cookies looked great, but the smell made me sick to my stomach. Caffeine wasn’t allowed, so some of the tea was off-limits. I felt bad not being able to use much from these expensive baskets filled with goodies, but my body couldn’t handle them physically. On the bright side, my husband enjoyed some of the items!

With that said, gift baskets can still be a great idea; however, only if they contain meaningful gifts, such as journals, coloring pencils/pens, hand sanitizer, candies (to get rid of the awful chemo taste), puzzle books, coloring books, books with motivational sayings, and favorite magazines, says San Miguel. “These baskets are great as later on they can be used to keep by them with their medicines, TV remote control, books, tissues, snacks, agenda with med appointments, etc.”

3. Donate to a special cause in the person’s name.

A former client of mine donated to the Mesothelioma Applied Research Foundation in my name, and that to me meant more than anything. Getting a letter from MARF saying that a donation was made in my name was truly special, and something I’ll never forget. It’s a really rewarding experience donating to an organization or charity connected to the individual–plus it helps so many others also suffering from the same illness! It was my first introduction to the foundation that has become an important part of my life.

The key to giving this holiday season is to remember the person who’s sick is still the same person. They may have chemo overwhelming their body, and energy levels at an all time low, but they’re still the friend or loved one that you’ve always known. Their interests, hobbies, and passions aren’t lost when diagnosed; rather, they use those same sources of positivity to help make their fight more tolerable. Distract them, help them, and most importantly, provide hope.

Nursing Role in the Diversity and Inclusive Excellence Discourse in the United States

Nursing Role in the Diversity and Inclusive Excellence Discourse in the United States

What is diversity? According to the Oxford English Dictionary, it is “the condition of being diverse, different, or varied; difference, unlikeness.” This simplistic definition of diversity does not assign any judgment or negative connotation to any of the words used to define it. However, the word “diversity” evokes multidimensional judgements, reactions, ideas, emotions, and actions, some of which could have adverse social and health consequences for generations of individuals in the United States.

Nursing, as the largest health care workforce in the United States with over 3 million nurses, is well positioned to champion diversity efforts. In 2010, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) published a landmark report, The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health. In this report, the IOM indicated that the nursing profession was not diverse to care for diverse populations across the lifespan. The IOM recommended that a diversity agenda be promoted, especially with increasing the diversity of nursing students. In partnership with AARP, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) launched a campaign to implement the IOM recommendations from its 2010 report. Subsequently, commissioned by the RWJF, the IOM evaluated the state of affairs regarding these recommendations. In 2015, another report, Assessing Progress on the Institute of Medicine Report The Future of Nursing, was published. In this report, the IOM specified that nursing has improved on the recommendation to diverse the nursing workforce. Nonetheless, there remain gaps that must be addressed to meet the diversity goal for the nursing profession. Consequently, the new recommendation for nursing is that diversity must continue to be a priority that is paralleled with a series of actions to promote it. Before nursing can accomplish this noble goal, there should be a well-vetted strategic plan on diversity and inclusion in all nursing programs, schools, and colleges in the United States. Students, faculty, and staff must be an integral part of the dialogue to promote diversity within the nursing profession.

At the University of Florida College of Nursing (CON), we held our inaugural “Diversity and Inclusive Excellence” workshop in December 2015. This two-day workshop was designed for staff and faculty. As a member of the Diversity taskforce, I collaborated with the other taskforce members to invite G. Rumay Alexander, EdD, RN, FAAN, to lead the CON on this discussion. Alexander is director of the Office of Inclusive Excellence in the School of Nursing at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, a nationally known expert with vast knowledge and expertise on diversity and inclusive excellence, and president-elect of the National League for Nursing.

During the early morning hours of December 3, 2015, my individual lesson on the topic began with Alexander as I had breakfast with her. My antenna on the topic sharpened following our conversation. After introducing her to my fellow Diversity Taskforce members, I hurried to pack my car and return to the CON to proceed with the plans of the day. I noticed the dean, Anna McDaniel, PhD, RN, FAAN, from a distance. I hurried up to keep her pace. “Good morning, Dean,” I greeted in my usual manner. McDaniel responded with a broad smile and a twinkle in her eyes that I perfectly understood. I surmised that McDaniel had finally accepted the fact that I love referring to her as the “Dean.” We conversed as we headed to the CON and into the elevator. I noticed the necklace McDaniel wore. The costume necklace had different shapes, colors, sizes, lengths, and mosaic designs. They were

  •  audaciously woven, yet unintimidating;
  • different, yet complementary;
  • individually, unassuming — yet, together, a paragon of beauty, inviting;
  • all held by a perfectly thin strand, yet unbreakable.

“That’s a beautiful necklace,” I uttered. “It belonged to my mother, who died twelve years ago,” McDaniel shared. “Each bead came from a different country. I have a brochure that provides a description of each bead, including the country of origin and its material composition.” Then, McDaniel voiced the word that gladdened my heart. “I wore this necklace today because it’s appropriate to celebrate diversity, the topic of the CON workshop.”

McDaniel had appointed the Diversity Taskforce and provided us with her full support. But, the fact that she actually thought of and adorned herself with a necklace that I now coined as a “diversity necklace” to celebrate the CON inaugural diversity workshop was admirable to me.

Someone not sensitive to the current diversity concerns around the United States, and the racial unrest related to such matters, may not appreciate my exhilaration upon hearing the history of the necklace. At issue is that, in several communities around the United States, numerous individuals are thoughtless about the devastating effects of antidiversity rhetorics and actions on the lives of its victims. Many may not realize that any action, whether good or evil, begins in the mind. Conversely, any work to combat uncelebrated diversity and exclusivity must begin in the mind. When people think about and proactively perform small acts, such as expressing recognition of diversity through a piece of jewelry or other special actions to celebrate diversity, it goes a long way. It could change the thought process from exclusion to inclusion. When people are attentive to their behaviors and understand the detrimental effects their actions could have on other human beings, things might change for the better. I believe that, as a nation, we must check the poisonous thoughts that percolate in our minds and subsequently manifest in forms of antidiversity rhetorics and behaviors, unacceptance, and racism. Confronting monstrous suggestions in the mind is the first step that many of us need to take to begin to challenge the subtle and insidious systemic diversity-aversion and exclusion in the United States.

As I thought about this issue of diversity and the role that nursing can play to eliminate it, I reminisced about how the imperfections of people categorized within the social construction of race stimulate antidiversity and anti-inclusive sentiments and movements. I wondered how nursing can care for these individuals, many of whom are marred with scars of history. My poem, “The Color of Justice,” captures my perceptions of the undeniable genesis of these historical blemishes that shockingly remain, overtly or covertly, as status quo in various parts of this country.

The Color of Justice

What color is justice?
Absorbing pain, insults, and lashes
Ancestors packed shoulder-to-shoulder, hip-to-hip,
chained like fire woods
Bones of the feeble lie un-mourned in ocean deep
across the Atlantic
Their sweat built the wealth in the new world, but
crumps have become their portions
This name sound like them, we have filled the position,
they need to go away
Low-hanging pants, cove-hopping birds,
gun-brandishing bunch
We cannot deal with the anger, we are better off
with the accent, intra-color battle ignited
Round them up, throw away the key, population control
Babes on the breast, mama and grandmamma, sitting
on the front porch pondering about the next check
Hair tightly woven, fried, or twisted, nails freshly manicured, next bun in the oven
The fortunate may triumph at the end, treacherous roads treaded, stress claims the wounded body after all
That they survive is still a mystery that ought to win
them a trophy
Who are they?
What color is justice?
Reflecting heat, demanding respect, crushing heads
Rolled into the new world in Mayflower boasting of
prostitutes, thieves, and prodigal sons
Raised arms against raised tea taxes, won freedom
but deny it to another
Melanin deficient hue suggest superiority
Blood by blood, noose on hand, destroyed a generation,
eye un-batting
Deeds done in the name of God, He must be weeping
Damages proudly scattered in museums, we pay to
relive the tragedy
Privileges left and right on the backs of the poor
Man in bow tie, lady in heels, rear the children, your lavatory in the rear
Own your history, mend your ways, teach your babes right
Who are they?
What color is justice?
Broad face, warm hue, and welcoming gesture
Land is supreme and cares for the offspring
Infected with strange diseases, killed with gun powder, survivors kept in special places devoid of opportunities
Culture deconstructed, the sacred used as mascots
Surviving by balancing mind, body, and spirit, harmony
in the land is their mantra
Not many left but their spirit is strong
The land beckons for their touch, to purge its roots of deadened souls
What does the Unites States’ constitution say about them?
Who are they?
What color is justice?
Messiah has come, awaiting messiah, there is no messiah
We profess peace, spiritual path is the way
Whose belief is superior?
When six feet under, belief quenches, but tainted
souls still suffer
Where are their senses?
Who are they?
What color is justice?
Light? Energy? God?
Penetrates Black, White, Red hue, religious, non-religious
Building block of things created
Revitalizes without questioning, unites all things created
Shines for Black, White, and Red hue, religious and
non-religious
Knows no foolishness but shines for fools
Knows no discrimination but supports the life of discriminators
Invites reconciliation until judgement day
Come unto me Black, White, and Red hue, religious,
non-religious
My light is your strength, unity, and peace

One may wonder how a nurse who is an advocate for a diverse, inclusive, and just world could pen “The Color of Justice.” This poem reflects my dual perceptions as a black woman and a nurse, of how the historical racial unrest that has plagued the United States for centuries has been subtly perpetuated even today. But, they ought not have continued, had the United States paid real attention and reconciled both the apparent and undercurrent narratives of this poem after the abolition of Jim Crow laws. As a black woman, I think that the first relevant question ought to be: How do individuals from diverse backgrounds interpret their historical or lived experiences in the United States? I encourage each one of us to answer this question individually or as a family, church, academic institution, or financial organization. I assert that there must be a recognition and acceptance of the different dimensions of diversity of thoughts, ideas, and experiences. This recognition must be matched with “courageous dialogue” on diversity and inclusion. In addition, there have to be concrete and measurable action plans for allocating resources to implement iterative strategies to address identified diversity concerns. This exercise could be so powerful that diversity and inclusion become strengths and not detriments to our collective humanity.

As a nurse, I think the second pertinent question must be: What role can nursing play to mitigate the adverse generational effects of antidiversity and anti-inclusivity experiences on marginalized and excluded individuals? I contend that, in order for nursing to be professionally and culturally relevant in the future and to continue to have the public trust as a caring discipline, we must identify ways to champion the diversity and inclusive excellence agenda. There should be constant and mandated training on diversity for university staff and faculty, with measurable outcomes. Nursing as a profession should develop a curriculum with a diversity and inclusion plan threaded throughout it. One approach to operationalize this suggestion is to equip nursing students with skills necessary to be culturally competent, diversity-savvy, and inclusive-perceptive in order to encourage these values in their work settings. Patients and clients at the receiving end of compassionate, culturally competent care infused with the spirit of diversity and inclusiveness should remember the feelings associated with that care, and hopefully pay it forward. Slowly, the culture of superiority and nontolerance directed toward individuals from diverse backgrounds could dissipate and a new world facilitated by nursing and inhabited by truly compassionate and empathetic humans would emerge.

Nursing students are the future of the nursing profession. Therefore, nursing must constantly remind students that antidiversity and anti-inclusion rhetorics and behaviors, historically and contemporary, breed racism in the United States. They should also learn to celebrate how much improvement we have made as a profession. But, recognize that diversity work is lifelong. The juxtaposition of the history of racism in the United States with the improvements made toward eliminating it is useful for at least two reasons: The contrast provides the space for constructive discourses and opportunities to develop positive avenues for endorsing diversity, and it allows for future and ongoing actions to completely obliterate racism heralded by antidiversity and anti-inclusive beliefs in the United States. Consequently, bead by bead—though diverse in shapes, colors, sizes, lengths, mosaic designs, and historical origins—we can hang unbreakably strong on the perfect strand of humanity, which unites us as “one Nation under God.”

Nola the Nurse – Showing Kids What Nurse Practitioners Do

Nola the Nurse – Showing Kids What Nurse Practitioners Do

When Dr. Scharmaine Baker started the Nola the Nurse book series, she knew kids needed information about advanced practice nurses and a role model to show them all about it. What Baker, DNP, didn’t expect was the impact the character and the Nola books would have on kids or the people who would help her get the word out.

On October 27, Baker told her story on The Harry Show, in which New Orleans-native, show host, and entertainer Harry Connick, Jr. gave her a chance to talk about Nola the Nurse on a show devoted to nursing. While the experience was thrilling (and included a vacation to Punta Cana that Connick gave to her family), Baker was especially excited at the thought of having more information about nursing and advanced practice nursing reach a national audience so quickly. “He said, ‘I really believe in Nola the Nurse and I hope this show helps you go far,’” recalls Baker of Connick’s support.

Nola has really taken off,” says Baker. She started the books when she couldn’t find any books that featured African American NPs or even many that talked about nursing as a career. Baker’s books take her Nola character into people’s homes, each of which exposes her to different cultures.

Over the summer, Baker said she thought a mascot would help the kids connect nursing to real life, so she added a life-size Nola doll to bring with her when she makes presentations and reads her books to groups. “She’s a tremendous hit,” says Baker about the Nola doll.

Kids get engaged with the story and it’s an opportunity for them to listen to her heart and to check her pulse,” says Baker.

As Baker continues to develop the Nola series (three more books are set to be published starting next year), she is developing a specific structure to help kids understand what NPs do. Using the Nola mascot, stickers, activity books, and the stories themselves, Baker connects with elementary school kids in schools, camps, and groups.

As the program is taken to teens in high school, Baker finds it just easy to talk to them about nursing as a career. “It’s engaging the next generation into the world of advanced practice nursing,” says Baker.

Preventing Central Line Infections: A Nursing Priority

Preventing Central Line Infections: A Nursing Priority

One of the most common but preventable hospital-acquired infections is a central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI), also known as a catheter-related bloodstream infection. There are approximately 250,000 cases annually in hospitals across the country, including 80,000 in intensive care units according to a study published in the Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing. Additionally, CLABSIs cost over $6 billion health care dollars and about 50,000 preventable deaths per a study published in the Journal of Infusion Nursing.

Bedside nurses have the responsibility to implement the right interventions to prevent them. Appropriate training and education in central line management can go a long way in preventing this problem. Nurses are in a unique position to prevent CLABSIs across the health care spectrum. It would not be an overstretch to say that CLABSI prevention is completely a nursing responsibility. Let us consider the current health care scenario: the nursing scope of practice has increased vastly over the past decade and our profession continues to gain significance.

The most common central used in acute care—peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) lines—are mostly inserted by specially trained nurses. It is also the bedside nurse that accesses the central line to administer medications, obtain blood samples, et cetera. Finally, when the patient is discharged and does not need the central line, it is the bedside nurse that discontinues and removes the line safely. Granted, few central lines are accessed by radiology and rarely by doctors, but the bottom line is that nurses are the ones inserting, maintaining, and removing the lines.

Two distinct situations place patients at a risk of acquiring a CLABSI: insertion and hub manipulation for blood sampling, medication administration, and routine line maintenance. Improper skin cleansing before insertion of the central line poses the risk of introducing deadly pathogens into the bloodstream. The hub, or needleless catheters, are known for harboring biofilms (e.g., bacterial colonies), which can enter the bloodstream during care episodes that involve hub manipulation. One of the most common sources of a CLABSI is the frequent hub manipulation by nursing for care purposes.

What can frontline nurses do to prevent CLABSIs?

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Infusion Nurses Society provide the following guidelines on insertion, care, and maintenance of central lines:

  1. Maintain a closed system.
  2. Scrub access ports (needleless caps) with antiseptic solution (70% alcohol) for at least 15-20 seconds before access.
  3. Use intermittent infusion caps of luer-lock design to ensure a secure junction.
  4. Change hubs or needleless connectors when it is removed from the line; if there is blood/debris within the cap; prior to blood sampling; upon known contamination; and per organization or manufacturer guidelines, policies or practice procedures.
  5. Change hubs or needleless connectors before and after blood sampling provides greater protection to the patient.

The Journal of Infusion Nursing study found that two beliefs among nurses predisposed them to disinfect the needleless cap before manipulation: nurses’ perceptions of peer beliefs regarding disinfection and personal belief that not cleaning the cap will increase the likelihood of patient acquiring an infection. Another significant finding of the study is that older and more experienced nurses were “less likely to consistently use the best practice disinfection techniques” while manipulating needleless IV systems.

One of the biggest lessons we can take from these studies and statistics is the fact that nurses have the power to prevent infection. The researchers found that some older and more experienced nurses tend to neglect disinfection practices, but it is important to remember that nursing is about caring for the patient. Education departments of hospitals can remind nurses by conducting classes on the fundamental values of nursing: caring, patient advocacy, beneficence, non-malfeasance, and so on.

Sometimes patients are discharged home with central lines in place for long-term antibiotic therapy or chemotherapy. Educating the patients and families on the best practices of central line care and infection prevention is the responsibility of nursing staff. Making patients and caregivers partners in therapy by creating educational materials in simple language will help motivate adult learners to assimilate the knowledge. An interactive nurse-led demonstration accompanied by an illustrated guide to best practices of central line management will ensure compliance to strict infection prevention practices. Again, this responsibility of educating patients falls on nurses, and patient education is a powerful tool to prevent CLABSIs. Education empowers the patient and gives them ownership of their own care and condition.

To sum up, evidence-based research points to the fact that frontline nurses are the main stakeholders in CLABSI prevention. Improving practice to prevent CLABSIs will not only save about $6 billion annually, but it will also ensure that 50,000 more patients survive hospitalization and go home to their loved ones. It is up to nurses to make hospitals places to get treatment, rest, and rejuvenation, rather than scary buildings where one remains on the edge of acquiring a hospital-acquired infection. Nurses have been making a difference in patient outcomes for several decades—and now is the time to up the ante.

salary122

HOW DOES YOUR SALARY COMPARE TO OTHER NURSES?

Learn how your ethnic background, location, and specialty might affect your annual salary. Take the 2017 Nurse Salary Survey and check out the results in the Summer Issue of Minority Nurse

You have Successfully Subscribed!