Nursing Now Campaign Launches Feb. 27

Nursing Now Campaign Launches Feb. 27

If you ever need a reason to feel proud of the lifesaving treatment and the compassionate caregiving, you offer every day in your nursing career, the launch of Nursing Now on February 27 is a big one.

In an effort to raise the profile of nursing as a career and as a worldwide factor in improving health, the International Council of Nurses and the World Health Organization are launching Nursing Now across the globe.

Nursing Now is organized by the Burdett Trust for Nursing, a UK-based charitable trust. As nurses’ status increases, their influence will be felt in policy, reputation, and the status of the professional nurse. Nurses themselves can begin to tackle some of the biggest challenges that are facing humanity in the next century.

No matter what location nurses practice, they face similar challenges. They want the best opportunity and training to offer their patients top-notch care so they can lead better and healthier lives on their own and within their communities. Nursing Now will push for those changes, but nurses will see them happen slowly in their own communities and then on a broader national level before becoming a worldwide trend.

The launch is the first step in an initiative that runs through 2020. Nursing Now will support other programs around the world and hep nurses become more able to influence the ways in which they work and effect change with patient and community health.

The initiative has five stated goals:

1. Greater investment in improving education, professional development, standards, regulation and employment conditions for nurses.

2. Increased and improved dissemination of effective and innovative practice in nursing.

3. Greater influence for nurses and midwives on global and national health policy, as part of broader efforts to ensure health workforces are more involved in decision-making.

4. More nurses in leadership positions and more opportunities for development at all levels.

5. More evidence for policy and decision makers about: where nursing can have the greatest impact, what is stopping nurses from reaching their full potential and how to address these obstacles.

Nursing Now recognizes that global change begins as people work together in each and every community. As nurses band together for change, the momentum will grow and impact greater people and reach into higher changes.

The University of North Carolina Chapel Hill School of Nursing will host with United States launch event, and nurses will be able to check the main website throughout the day to learn about other events worldwide.

On February 27, check out Nursing Now and envision and even stronger and more influential nursing future.

Thinking of Starting a Job Search?

Thinking of Starting a Job Search?

Are you thinking it’s time to test the water on a job search? Is your career feeling stagnant and you think it’s time to move to a new organization or even a new branch of nursing?

What can help you with your decision if you’re not ready for a full-fledged job search?

Testing out whether it’s time for a job switch takes some thought and a little bit of work. Here are a few ways nurses can gather information without jumping into a full search.

Sit in on Seminars

Find some seminars or classes that will help you decide if you want to move from emergency nursing to travel nursing or from infusion nursing to cardiac care. Get some experience, talk to a professor or class leader, and chat with others in the room (even in online classes) to get a point of reference in your job change decision.

Become a Visible Networker

Networking isn’t all about finding a new job, but it is about becoming noticed in your profession. And if you have an active and extensive network when you are looking for a job, you’ll have a valuable resource. Find association meetings, nursing groups, or even a few general business groups and regularly attend meetings. Meet new people and offer your help as well.

Go to a Career Fair

Find a healthcare career fair and take some time walking around. Come prepared with resumes just in case you find an excellent opportunity, but make gathering information your primary goal. Investigate what jobs are out there and see how your qualifications measure up.

Gain Skills

Whether you take on more responsibility in your current role or gain skills on a team to learn new skills (volunteering for your town’s emergency response team, for instance), know you need to learn more. Start the process for a new certification or volunteer to learn the new software at work – just make sure your skills are current, cutting-edge, and marketable.

If you decide a career move is your next step, you’ll be ready with a solid understanding of the available opportunities and how your skills will meet the market needs.

Transport Nurses: Providing Care on the Move

Transport Nurses: Providing Care on the Move

Nurses provide top quality care in all settings, but critical care transport nurses have a slightly different typical treatment space. They could administer life-saving care in an ambulance moving at top speed or in flight thousands of feet in the air.

Every February 18, the Air & Surface Transport Nurses Association (ASTNA) sponsors Critical Care Transport Nurses Day to recognize the work in this distinctive branch of nursing.

Critical care transport nurses provide on-scene nursing care in instances when patients need to be transported from one location to another. It could be an ambulance or a medflight taking patients from one institution to another or from an accident scene to a medical facility.

Transport nurses generally work as part of an emergency response team or as part of a transport team in non-emergency situations. They will provide assessments of a patient’s condition, injuries, vital signs, and will remain with the patient during transport to make sure the patient is kept stabilized.

Transport nurses often work within constantly shifting teams. Being able to adapt to and work within different frameworks will help you focus on your patient while fulfilling your role on the team.

If you are thinking this type of nursing would be a good choice for you, there are a couple of things to keep in mind. You must attain registered nurse credentials, several life support training credentials (adult/pediatric), and then gain at least two years of nursing experience in a critical care environment (like an emergency room). You’ll want experience in a general environment of critical care so you can be exposed to many different situations as that will mirror what you’ll see as a critical care transport nurse.

Because of the nature of working in an environment that is literally moving, you must be able to provide treatment in constantly changing environments. You’ll need to be able to lift and move patients with assistance, and be able to work electronically with team members at a medical care facility.

Transport nurses gain certification through the Board of Certification for Emergency Nursing in joint partnership with ASTNA. After you pass the certification exam, your certification will either be as a certified flight registered nurse (CFRN) if you typically operate in flight or as a certified transport registered nurse (CTRN) if your practice is generally in ground transport. If you practice on the ground and in flight, you can either choose the most pertinent certification or you may earn both certifications.

Critical care transport nursing will call on you to use every nursing skill you have and your situations will all be varied. On February 18, honor the critical care nurses in your organization!

Heart Health for Busy Nurses

Heart Health for Busy Nurses

February is American Heart Month — what better time to reassess how well you are taking care of your heart health?

Know Your Risk Factors

As a minority nurse, you probably know certain minority groups have higher risks for heart disease. According to the American Heart Association, African Americans, American Indians/Native Alaskans, and Hispanics have an increased risk of heart disease and its associated problems like high blood pressure, heart attack, and stroke.

Other risk factors include hereditary factors (others in your family have heart disease), smoking, obesity, sedentary lifestyle, and poor diet.

Know the Signs

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, there are a few heart attack signs and symptoms that you shouldn’t ignore.

If you experience any of these symptoms, call 911 immediately.

  • Pain or discomfort in the jaw, neck, or back
  • Feeling weak, light-headed, or faint
  • Chest pain or discomfort
  • Pain or discomfort in arms or shoulder
  • Shortness of breath

Women also tend to have symptoms that are different from men and, therefore, aren’t always immediately considered as heart trouble.

Watch for these unusual signs:

  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Heartburn
  • Extreme fatigue
  • Feelings of unease or anxiety

Heart disease isn’t called the silent killer for no reason. If you feel something is off, whether that’s occasional chest pain with exercise or under stress, heart palpitations, or off-and-on chest discomfort, always be cautious and get it checked.

Reduce Your Risk

If you have risk factors for heart disease, you should monitor your blood pressure, your cholesterol, and your blood sugar. Try to reduce your risk by maintaining a healthy weight, getting enough physical activity, being sure to rest, staying connected with loved ones, and trying to keep your stress levels in check.

With the hectic pace of a nurse’s day, getting any time to bring your stress down a notch is a struggle. But one simple way to help with stress reduction is to step outside. Plenty of research backs up the idea that more time outside is better for your health. A few minutes walking at lunch, parking far enough away in a parking lot, or even just getting a few breaths of fresh air on a break can have huge benefits on your physical health and your mental health. Getting into nature can clear your mind, lower your blood pressure, and help you clear out the mental clutter enough to focus better when you come back to work.

Heart disease is the number-one killer of men and women in the United States, so paying attention to your own heart health is one of the best preventative measures you can take.

Appreciating Perianesthesia Nurses Everywhere

Appreciating Perianesthesia Nurses Everywhere

February 5 through 11 is a national observance of National PeriAnesthesia Nurse Awareness Week, sponsored by the American Society of PeriAnesthesia Nurses (ASPAN). Nurses who help transition patients pre- and post-procedure are there to offer intensive medical care and equally essential caregiving. They especially want patients to know they are there for them. They are their advocates throughout the process.

If you are interested in a career as a perianesthesia nurse, you’ll find the challenges of the position range from using your advanced nursing skills in urgent situations to incorporating the most basic hands-on comfort skills. Charged with caring for patients at critical pre- and post-procedure points, perianesthesia nurses must be able to multitask, to identify and respond to patient conditions immediately, and to do this all with a calm demeanor to help keep patient stress at bay.

Perianesthesia nurses especially enjoy their work caring for patients before and after procedures that require any anesthesia. Before a procedure, they are the nurses who are there to find out any information that could have an impact on the anesthesia care. With more and more patients appearing with several health conditions, they have to factor in variables like medications, physical condition and limitations, and emotional stability in their patient assessment. While they are assessing and gathering information, they are also providing a calm and unwavering support to help nervous patients know they are in trusted hands.

Perianesthesia nurses are also there when patients come out of anesthesia and are sometimes confused, uncomfortable, or even nauseated or vomiting. Post-procedure, nurses are once again continually monitoring a patient, assessing vital signs, reassessing existing health conditions, and at the same time, offering that hands-on caregiving that helps patients feel safe. Perianesthesia nurses then help determine how a patient can safely move to their next place whether that is to home, another hospital, or another care facility.

Many perianesthesia nurses say they have perfected a way to develop a rapport with patients that can build the trust necessary for completing such a long task list in a short time and under pressure. Once a nurse has identified a topic that helps the patient relax, they can begin conversations about family, pets, schooling, movies, or books that are both informative for nurses and distracting for patients. Many nurses also say they use those nuggets in the conversation to help bring a patient out of a drowsy and sometimes confused anesthesia.

For those considering this branch of nursing, ASPAN offers many resources and is an excellent reference to find out information about certification (through the American Board of Perianesthesia Nursing Certification, Inc.) that must be renewed every three years, scholarships for education, career resources, mentoring opportunities, conferences, and up-to-date anesthesia information.

This week, recognize and appreciate the perianesthesia nurses on your team. Their skills often help the entire procedure proceed smoothly and safely.