Starting a job search is exciting. Thinking about a new nursing role or working in a new organization is often energizing and helps get you through the work of looking for a new position. But if you are getting lots of rejections (or even flat-out silence), it’s time to shake things up.

Today’s job market is intense and competitive. If you’re a qualified nurse with a solid background of great work, finding a job shouldn’t be as hard as it sometimes is. If your resumes and inquires are being met with a solid round of no, it’s time to step back and see what you could do better.

1. Take a New Approach

If you’re only sending out resumes, it’s time to do something different. Branch out into professional organizations or networking groups. See if there are any seminars or lectures on LinkedIn or in local organizations. Get yourself out of your routine and meeting new people. Despite today’s incredible technological advances, many job offers come though personal connections not computers.

2. Check that Resume

Sending out the same resume you started with months ago could be a problem. Lots of rejections means it’s time to change it. Your resume isn’t getting replies so check it over for obvious things like spelling errors or grammatical mistakes. But also look at your resume with a critical eye. Should you try easy-to-read bullet points instead of a paragraph? Do you have an outdated phrase like “references available on request” that you should delete? Are you showing rather than telling your experience? Change it up.

3. Prepare for Your Interview

Even if you have an interview with people you know, you have to remember you’re probably up against some highly qualified candidates. Each interview has to be your best interview. There’s no way around that, so you have to be prepared. Know the job, know about the company, be ready to talk about your accomplishments, and ask relevant questions. Be prepared enough so you can listen to your interviewer without just thinking about what you’ll say next. You’ll respond better and will be more relaxed.

4. Do the Follow Up

Follow up after your interview with a handwritten thanks. Email is fine, but in today’s electronic world, many people appreciate a handwritten note.

5. Keep Your Momentum Going

Even after you land a new job, keep growing your professional networks and building your reputation. Careers are always changing and you might decide on a new direction a few years down the road. If you are ready, the next opportunity might seek you out.

Julia Quinn-Szcesuil

Julia Quinn-Szcesuil

Julia Quinn-Szcesuil is a freelance writer based in Bolton, Massachusetts.
Julia Quinn-Szcesuil

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