Breast cancer is one of the most diagnosed cancers among African American women, yet research into their experiences with treatment lags behind. In particular, few studies have examined how African American women cope with fatigue, the most common side effect of treatment. To help fill the gaps, my research colleagues and I explored how fatigue affects African American women undergoing breast cancer treatment.

When it comes to breast cancer and African American women, fatigue coupled with fear are a significant part of the experience, with many African American women viewing breast cancer as an automatic death sentence. When we examine the mortality rate of breast cancer among African American women compared with women from other ethnic and racial groups, this perception is understandable. The American Cancer Society’s Breast Cancer Facts and Figures 2013–2014 report indicates that African American women had a lower breast cancer incidence rate than non-Hispanic white women; however, that same report states that African American women with breast cancer have a higher mortality rate. Many factors contribute to this racial disparity, including inadequate or lack of health insurance, screening behaviors, obesity, and a genetic component that results in more aggressive tumors.

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