Jacquelyn Taylor, PhD, PNP-BC, RN, FAHA, FAAN, has spent her career working hard, and as a result, she’s been a standout.

But she recently received an outstanding honor when she was elected to the National Academy of Medicine (NAM)—and she’s only one of two nurses selected this year.

“It is a tremendous honor to be selected as a member of NAM,” says Taylor. “Membership in NAM is one of the highest honors you can achieve in science and medicine.”

In order to be elected to NAM, Taylor explains that you must be nominated by a current member, as nominees are not involved in the nomination process. When you are elected to NAM, it means that you have been elected by a group of experts who see you as a premiere expert in your particular field.

According to a statement from NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing, Taylor has been recognized for her “bench-to-community research in gene-environment interaction studies on blood pressure among African-Americans that has provided novel contributions on SDoH and omic underpinnings of hypertension.”

“These newly elected members represent the most exceptional scholars and leaders whose remarkable work had advanced science, medicine, and health in the U.S. and around the globe,” NAM President Victor J. Dzau said in a statement. “Their expertise will be vital to addressing today’s most pressing health and scientific challenges and informing the future of health and medicine for the benefit of us all. I am honored to welcome these esteemed individuals to the National Academy of Medicine.”

While Taylor now works as a Professor and Vernice D. Ferguson Professor in Health Equity at the NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing, she began her academic career working as an Assistant Professor and Director of the Pediatric Nurse Practitioner Program at the School of Nursing at the University of Michigan. Taylor then worked for nine years at Yale, and became the first African American woman to go through the tenure track ranks. In 2014, she earned tenure. Later, Taylor was named the first Associate Dean of Diversity at the Yale School of Nursing where she remained until going to NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing. She then came to NYU to serve as the first Vernice D. Ferguson Endowed Chair. She also is the Director of the Meyers Biological Laboratory and Co-PI and Co-Director of the P20 Exploratory Center on Precision Health in Diverse Populations.

“Nurses have been members of NAM for a very long time. It is very important to have a membership that is diverse across health disciplines such as Nursing, Dentistry, and Medicine because all work together for the greater good of patients,” says Taylor. “I believe that my membership in NAM will add a greater voice and representation of nursing as an integral part of scientific research and practice.”

Taylor also hopes that this membership will open up opportunities so that she can “move the science forward in a more robust way and at an even larger scale.”

Michele Wojciechowski

Michele Wojciechowski is an award-winning writer and author of the humor book Next Time I Move, They’ll Carry Me Out in a Box.
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