Wow!! Can you believe that the first month of the new year is almost over? Many of us made resolutions that are probably already broken. So, what is a resolution? It is when people make a decision to do or not do something.  It has become a ritual to make them on Dec. 31st and usually by Jan 31st they are no longer being followed. Often, those decisions are generalized and vague. Here are some examples: I plan to exercise more, I am going to eat more healthy, or I am going to save money. No wonder by the end of the month people revert back to their old ways.

Instead of making “resolutions” we need to set goals that are more attainable and realistic. An acronym that works is to set SMART goals, which can be measured and determine if they have been reached. Using this principle can be applied to anything that you do and all aspects of your life (personal or business). Following is a breakdown of the elements of effective goals:

SMARTS-specific: who, what, when, where, why; simple yet significant.

M-measurable: How will you know that it has been reached? meaningful & motivating.

A-achievable: Can this happen and how? Can this goal be attained?

R-relevant: How does this help you overall to meet the goal? Is it realistic and reasonable?

T-time-bound: set a deadline or time-frame, when will this happen?

So those same resolutions set as SMART goals would look like the following:

  1. I will walk for 30 mins. each day for one month.
  2. I will avoid sugar and eat more vegetables for one week.
  3. I will start saving $50 each pay period for two months.

Make goals and establish how you will get there. You must keep track of your progress and evaluate and review them. Goals should be things that you actually have control over. With this format you can establish goals that will hopefully last until the end of the year or longer.

Leslie McRae-Matthews

Leslie McRae-Matthews, MSNEd, CGRN has been a nurse for 30 years.
She has had a passion and hobby for photography for 35 years and is an avid traveler. Her photos contain a diverse perspective of landscapes, architecture and wildlife. She captures images to draw the viewer into the photo.
Leslie McRae-Matthews

Latest posts by Leslie McRae-Matthews (see all)

Share This