This week, the American Association of Nurse Practitioners (AANP) leads the celebration of National Nurse Practitioners (NP) Week to mark the distinctive benefits of this career path.

According to the AANP, approximately 248,000 nurse practitioners hold an NP license in the United States. The career is especially appealing as NPs generally have more autonomy than other nurses. In some states, NPs are able to practice on their own without physician oversight, and, in doing so, can provide a full spectrum of care. They assess, diagnose, treat, and make a continual care plan for patients, so they are involved in each step of the patient’s care. Because of that, NPs often form close, long-lasting relationships with those they care for. NPs are able to prescribe medications across the US and almost half hold hospital privileges as well.

Nearly 98 percent of NPs hold graduate degrees and more than 8 in 10 hold some kind of primary care certification. For all the education NPs earn, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that they are rewarded with a salary that hovers around $111,000 annually. The job outlook is growing faster than average with a 31 percent growth predicted by 2026.

If you’re interested in this in-demand career path, you’ll need to obtain a master’s in nursing degree along with plenty of extra credentials like certifications. NPs often hold more than one certification and the credentials can be in related areas like neonatal care and pediatric care. You’ll need to pass an NP state licensing exam so you can be registered to practice in your state.

Many nurses find the NP role helps them make a positive impact when access to healthcare is essential and sometimes not in easy supply. NPs can make big inroads into the health of communities as they are able to care for patients in a variety of settings and situations. Nurse practitioners who want to practice autonomously need to have the extra information to know how to do that while protecting themselves and their patients.

NPs can and should connect with peers and colleagues to share the challenges of the role and talk about the satisfaction of this role. Networking will help their professional development and the information learned will often improve their patient care as well.

Julia Quinn-Szcesuil

Julia Quinn-Szcesuil

Julia Quinn-Szcesuil is a freelance writer based in Bolton, Massachusetts.
Julia Quinn-Szcesuil

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