Community and faith-based education programs have long been proven successful in reaching black communities. As an African American woman and advanced practice nurse, I have participated in many projects and studies to identify effective approaches to increase awareness, prevention, and treatment of health issues that impact my racial/ethnic group. After serving as a nurse expert for several successful community faith-based programs focused on various health issues, I worked with a local organization, in which I am a member, to address prostate cancer awareness and screening among black men in two counties in Virginia.

Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer in men, and, despite being treatable when detected early, is one of the leading causes of cancer death among men of all races, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Prostate cancer rates among black men are significantly higher than any other race, with more than 150 new diagnoses annually per 100,000 men in the United States. Clinical progression of prostate cancer is known to be more aggressive in black men as compared to white men. However, black men are less likely than their white counterparts to engage in shared decision making (SDM) with their health care provider about the benefits and risks of the gold-standard prostate specific antigen (PSA) test. Due to the increased risk for prostate cancer among black men, screening is recommended at earlier ages than the general population.

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