Thinking of Starting a Job Search?

Thinking of Starting a Job Search?

Are you thinking it’s time to test the water on a job search? Is your career feeling stagnant and you think it’s time to move to a new organization or even a new branch of nursing?

What can help you with your decision if you’re not ready for a full-fledged job search?

Testing out whether it’s time for a job switch takes some thought and a little bit of work. Here are a few ways nurses can gather information without jumping into a full search.

Sit in on Seminars

Find some seminars or classes that will help you decide if you want to move from emergency nursing to travel nursing or from infusion nursing to cardiac care. Get some experience, talk to a professor or class leader, and chat with others in the room (even in online classes) to get a point of reference in your job change decision.

Become a Visible Networker

Networking isn’t all about finding a new job, but it is about becoming noticed in your profession. And if you have an active and extensive network when you are looking for a job, you’ll have a valuable resource. Find association meetings, nursing groups, or even a few general business groups and regularly attend meetings. Meet new people and offer your help as well.

Go to a Career Fair

Find a healthcare career fair and take some time walking around. Come prepared with resumes just in case you find an excellent opportunity, but make gathering information your primary goal. Investigate what jobs are out there and see how your qualifications measure up.

Gain Skills

Whether you take on more responsibility in your current role or gain skills on a team to learn new skills (volunteering for your town’s emergency response team, for instance), know you need to learn more. Start the process for a new certification or volunteer to learn the new software at work – just make sure your skills are current, cutting-edge, and marketable.

If you decide a career move is your next step, you’ll be ready with a solid understanding of the available opportunities and how your skills will meet the market needs.

Transport Nurses: Providing Care on the Move

Transport Nurses: Providing Care on the Move

Nurses provide top quality care in all settings, but critical care transport nurses have a slightly different typical treatment space. They could administer life-saving care in an ambulance moving at top speed or in flight thousands of feet in the air.

Every February 18, the Air & Surface Transport Nurses Association (ASTNA) sponsors Critical Care Transport Nurses Day to recognize the work in this distinctive branch of nursing.

Critical care transport nurses provide on-scene nursing care in instances when patients need to be transported from one location to another. It could be an ambulance or a medflight taking patients from one institution to another or from an accident scene to a medical facility.

Transport nurses generally work as part of an emergency response team or as part of a transport team in non-emergency situations. They will provide assessments of a patient’s condition, injuries, vital signs, and will remain with the patient during transport to make sure the patient is kept stabilized.

Transport nurses often work within constantly shifting teams. Being able to adapt to and work within different frameworks will help you focus on your patient while fulfilling your role on the team.

If you are thinking this type of nursing would be a good choice for you, there are a couple of things to keep in mind. You must attain registered nurse credentials, several life support training credentials (adult/pediatric), and then gain at least two years of nursing experience in a critical care environment (like an emergency room). You’ll want experience in a general environment of critical care so you can be exposed to many different situations as that will mirror what you’ll see as a critical care transport nurse.

Because of the nature of working in an environment that is literally moving, you must be able to provide treatment in constantly changing environments. You’ll need to be able to lift and move patients with assistance, and be able to work electronically with team members at a medical care facility.

Transport nurses gain certification through the Board of Certification for Emergency Nursing in joint partnership with ASTNA. After you pass the certification exam, your certification will either be as a certified flight registered nurse (CFRN) if you typically operate in flight or as a certified transport registered nurse (CTRN) if your practice is generally in ground transport. If you practice on the ground and in flight, you can either choose the most pertinent certification or you may earn both certifications.

Critical care transport nursing will call on you to use every nursing skill you have and your situations will all be varied. On February 18, honor the critical care nurses in your organization!

Appreciating Perianesthesia Nurses Everywhere

Appreciating Perianesthesia Nurses Everywhere

February 5 through 11 is a national observance of National PeriAnesthesia Nurse Awareness Week, sponsored by the American Society of PeriAnesthesia Nurses (ASPAN). Nurses who help transition patients pre- and post-procedure are there to offer intensive medical care and equally essential caregiving. They especially want patients to know they are there for them. They are their advocates throughout the process.

If you are interested in a career as a perianesthesia nurse, you’ll find the challenges of the position range from using your advanced nursing skills in urgent situations to incorporating the most basic hands-on comfort skills. Charged with caring for patients at critical pre- and post-procedure points, perianesthesia nurses must be able to multitask, to identify and respond to patient conditions immediately, and to do this all with a calm demeanor to help keep patient stress at bay.

Perianesthesia nurses especially enjoy their work caring for patients before and after procedures that require any anesthesia. Before a procedure, they are the nurses who are there to find out any information that could have an impact on the anesthesia care. With more and more patients appearing with several health conditions, they have to factor in variables like medications, physical condition and limitations, and emotional stability in their patient assessment. While they are assessing and gathering information, they are also providing a calm and unwavering support to help nervous patients know they are in trusted hands.

Perianesthesia nurses are also there when patients come out of anesthesia and are sometimes confused, uncomfortable, or even nauseated or vomiting. Post-procedure, nurses are once again continually monitoring a patient, assessing vital signs, reassessing existing health conditions, and at the same time, offering that hands-on caregiving that helps patients feel safe. Perianesthesia nurses then help determine how a patient can safely move to their next place whether that is to home, another hospital, or another care facility.

Many perianesthesia nurses say they have perfected a way to develop a rapport with patients that can build the trust necessary for completing such a long task list in a short time and under pressure. Once a nurse has identified a topic that helps the patient relax, they can begin conversations about family, pets, schooling, movies, or books that are both informative for nurses and distracting for patients. Many nurses also say they use those nuggets in the conversation to help bring a patient out of a drowsy and sometimes confused anesthesia.

For those considering this branch of nursing, ASPAN offers many resources and is an excellent reference to find out information about certification (through the American Board of Perianesthesia Nursing Certification, Inc.) that must be renewed every three years, scholarships for education, career resources, mentoring opportunities, conferences, and up-to-date anesthesia information.

This week, recognize and appreciate the perianesthesia nurses on your team. Their skills often help the entire procedure proceed smoothly and safely.

IV Nurse Day Highlights Quality Care for All Patients

IV Nurse Day Highlights Quality Care for All Patients

The celebration of IV Nurse Day every January 25 recognizes the work infusion nurses do with and for their patients. Infusion nurses are an essential part of the care team, acting to properly care for infusion needs and collaborating with other members of the health care team.

Challenges in our ever-changing healthcare system combined with new, developing technologies and complex infusion therapies, afford the opportunity for the infusion nurse to use his/her expertise in infusion therapy to provide holistic patient care,” says Marlene Steinheiser, MSN, RN, CRNI®, director of nursing education of the Infusion Nurses Society (INS), Infusion Nurses Certification Corporation.

Of the primary responsibilities of an IV nurse, acting with the patient’s health and welfare in mind is primary. Celebrated since 1980, IV Nurse Day focuses attention on this essential care. “The infusion nurse acts as an advocate for patients receiving infusion therapy, ensuring that safe, quality infusion care is delivered,” says Steinheiser. “Patient assessment, with particular attention to the patient’s vasculature and prescribed therapy, is important so that the appropriate vascular access device (VAD) is selected to accommodate the treatment plan.”

Steinheiser also says that many infusion nurses also take on leadership roles where they provide education and guidance to other nurses while also continually monitoring for complications and setting in motion effective interventions when needed.

Student nurses interested in the career will find infusion nurses are not limited to specific settings. “Infusion nurses’ roles may vary depending upon the practice setting,” Steinheiser says. “Infusion nurses work in many settings, agencies, and organizations including, but not limited to, hospitals, nursing homes, ambulatory infusion clinicals, physician offices, and patient homes.”

According to Steinheiser, expert infusion nurses can help reduce complications by sharing their knowledge and educating patients, family members, and other healthcare team members and always assessing the patient. “Skilled VAD insertion, prevention of complications and early identification coupled with implementation of interventions, minimizes further damage that can result from infusion-related complications,” she says.

Like any nursing career, this branch of nursing requires continual education to stay current with best evidence-based practices that help prevent, reduce, and treat any complications or challenges. “Due to the invasive nature of infusion therapy, infusion nurses can encounter possible adverse events with any infusion, such as extravasation, catheter malposition, nerve damage, or infection,” Steinheiser says. “The infusion nurse is prepared with advanced knowledge and continuing education to promptly address these situations.”

The INS is an excellent resource for current and future infusion nurses. The organization offers free educational podcasts (available to members and nonmembers) where nurses can learn about and refresh their skills for safe infusion practices. And the learning center provides both virtual education and recorded educational sessions from prior conferences and webinars, and what Steinheiser calls a key resource for infusion nurses, the Infusion Therapy Standards of Practice.

As with other nursing practices, nurses with the desire to specialize in infusion therapy may study and take the certification exam offered twice a year, says Steinheiser. “To assist the nurse in preparing for this exam, INS has study material which covers the eight core components of infusion nursing,” she says. “Once nurses pass this exam, they are considered infusion nurse specialists and can begin using the credential CRNI®. The CRNI® is capable of an expanded role in directing evidence-based clinical practice, research, and quality improvement activities.”

Infusion nurses care for all patients, providing care that helps many other healthcare processes go more smoothly. “Infusion nurses provide for all patient populations, from the neonate to the elderly patient, and follow them along the continuum of care,” says Steinheiser. “Infusion nurses use their critical thinking skills, perform advanced procedures using state-of-the-art technology, and ensure safe infusion care.”

Increasing Realism in Clinical Simulation

Increasing Realism in Clinical Simulation

Nursing education is done a little differently at Linfield College. We pride ourselves on creating innovative methods in which aspiring nurses can learn and grow into strong and competent professionals. One of the many ways in which that is done is through our simulation program. Our simulation program is run out of our experiential learning center (or ELC); it includes low, mid, and high-fidelity simulations. With these simulations, our students go in one by one to care for the patients individually for ten to fifteen minutes at a time with each student picking up where the other one left off. They plan the care together using what’s called a mega brain and prioritize the patient’s needs within the plan prior to the start of care for the patient. We have not witnessed this method being used at many facilities.

The students have the option of continuing care as the previous student or changing the plan; they are all the same nurse so if they are in the middle of a task then they are able to continue with that task without starting the steps over again, which saves time and enables them to carry out the task. In the past, we had found that having each student start over took away from the simulation experience and that the students were more focused on the task instead of the patient. This brought about the solution of one mind nursing. The students have found this to be extremely helpful and have verbalized how this increases the realism of the clinical simulation by having them think like a nurse, especially with the situation of end of shift or hand-off. In this situation the students have to consider what is the best option if they receive hand-off in the middle of a nursing task. This is one of the aspects that increases realism.

Another method of increasing realism comes from the use of alumni. We use alumni as family members during the simulation (we have a manikin or a standardized patient as an actor). During the simulation, the alumni act as though they are the family members dealing with that situation. After the simulation is complete, they help with debriefing after we walk through the case and ask high-level critical thinking questions to stimulate reflection, retention, and transference. They tie in clinical examples of how it relates to their clinical practice and emphasize why the clinical reasoning and actions based on clinical judgement are so important. The students enjoy having the alumni because they have shared their experience and have gone through what they have experienced and have become successful after it. The alumni serve as additional mentors and role models in this way, offering advice and further insight into the role of nurses. With this addition to our clinical simulation program, we have created a more realistic and enjoyable experience for our students.

Nurse Anesthetists Offer Career Info for Student Nurses

Nurse Anesthetists Offer Career Info for Student Nurses

Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNA) Week runs this week from January 21 to 27 and is an excellent opportunity for student nurses to find out more about this path in a nursing career.

With more than 52,000 nurse anesthetists and student nurse anesthetists, the career is thriving and attractive for several reasons. Many nurse anesthetists say the patient interaction they have is unsurpassed. They are with patients before, during, and after surgery, so there’s a necessary trust that is quickly established with the skill and care of the nurse.

Nursing students who are considering this as a career have many resources they can reference and various organizations that will help them succeed on this career path. The American Association of Nurse Anesthetists (AANA) is especially aware of promoting health and wellness among the student nurses who seek a career in this branch of nursing. The AANA’s 2017 report Wellness and Thriving in a Student Registered Nurse Anesthetist Population explored the significance of the relationship between student wellness and how well students do in their academic program.

To celebrate CRNA Week, Minority Nurse recently posed some questions to Michael Neft, DNP, MHA, CRNA, FNAP, FAAN, and assistant director of the Nurse Anesthesia Program University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing and nursing student Sara Wilkinson, BSN, RN, CCRN SRNA at University of Tennessee Health Sciences Center. The following are their answers.

Why is the AANA particularly aware of the health and wellness among student nurses looking to enter or actively studying in this field?

Student nurses are the future of the profession, and it is important to cultivate and prepare for a long and healthy career. Students who aspire to enter into nurse anesthesia programs must be healthy mentally and physically. They must have healthy outlets for stress relief, and healthy lifestyle habits that will support them throughout our educational programs.

Nurse anesthesia education programs are required by their accreditation standards to provide education content on wellness and substance use disorder. The AANA actively encourages members, students, as well as educational programs to engage whenever possible in healthy behaviors, whether that includes physical activity or simply reducing stress by encouraging individuals to take time for their loved ones or to engage in an activity they love.

The AANA is committed to providing resources and information about ways to become involved in establishing a healthy lifestyle and even offers fun runs, wellness tutorials and a massage therapy area at many of their conferences.

How does establishing good health and wellness practices now help a student nurse become better? And how will taking care of oneself now carry over once they graduate and are several years into a CRNA career?

Nursing has unique stressors like dealing with patient care situations that require critical thinking, fast decision making, and autonomy is tough. If the student nurse does not have the ability to cope with these situations autonomously, it is very difficult to care for patients. Maintaining both mental and physical health and wellness are at the foundation of successful practice.

Developing healthy lifestyle habits early, helps students handle stress more effectively, set clear goals, and develop a clear plan to achieve them. They also assist students with discipline, good study habits, prepare for clinical experiences properly, and self-evaluate objectively. It also helps to establish diet and exercise plans that can be adjusted as one transitions to practice, to avoid elimination of healthy habits out of inconvenience.

Maintaining a school-life balance is also important to develop a support system and find time for small, pleasant breaks to gives a fresh perspective and recharge. Establishing healthy behaviors and habits early is vital to long-term health, wellness, and maintenance of a successful career.

Do you have any advice for student nurses about considering this field and being aware of any challenges unique to this branch of nursing?

For student nurses considering the field of nurse anesthesia, awareness about the depth and breadth of study is valuable, but is important to be well, so that an individual will have the endurance to graduate. A strong support system and personal discipline are necessary to allow for healthy stress relief and appropriate professional conduct. Anesthesia remains the field with the highest incidence of drug abuse and unhealthy coping behaviors, due to high stress and access.

Think about what you do when stressed. Review your lifestyle habits: exercise, eating, alcohol use, and other substance use. Some prospective students may want to employ a lifestyle coach who can look at a person individually and help one to develop positive lifestyle habits that will set one up for success in graduate school and a stressful career. Good study habits, a healthy respect for one’s self and career, use of study resources, and strong, supportive relationships will be required to succeed and thrive in this field.

Just Published!

The Minority Nurse Spring 2018 issue is now available.

Improving Patient Care Through Unique Clinical Solutions

How Nurses Can Make Better Financial Decisions

 How to Protect Yourself from Stressful Work Experiences

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