9 Tips for Nursing Students Taking Online Classes

9 Tips for Nursing Students Taking Online Classes

Whether your classes were newly moved online due to coronavirus, or you’ve been enrolled in an online class from the get-go, nursing students all over the world have suddenly found themselves taking classes remotely. To help with the adjustment, here are our nine top tips for acing your online nursing classes.

1. Don’t assume online is easier.

Just because you can wear sweatpants, it doesn’t mean that online classes are a walk in the park. Plus, if you dress the part and wear your nursing scrubs, you’ll get into the nursing mindset. Some people make the mistake of assuming they can coast through an online class, believing that it will be easier than an in-person class. While online classes are certainly different from in-person ones, they’re not easier, just hard in a different way. Believing that you can slack off in your online classes purely because they are online will quickly lead to a failing grade. Taking it seriously from the beginning is the best recipe for success.

2. Get the equipment you need to succeed.

No, we’re not talking about clinical supplies. Take stock of what technology you currently have and what you might need to invest in. You’ll most likely need a reliable computer and other tools such as an external monitor, a mouse, and a keyboard as well. Test your internet connection and make sure that it can handle steaming lectures, video calls, and other high capacity tasks—the last thing you want is your internet cutting out in the middle of a quiz. If your internet isn’t up to the task, you might need to upgrade your plan or get a new router.

3. Embrace the possibilities of technology.

Online classes may be new and exciting territory for many people. They offer many fantastic possibilities for interactive learning that simply aren’t possible inside a physical classroom. In fact, many in-person classes still assign work that must be done online prior to class because the interactivity element of online programs can’t be reproduced. Online classes also allow you to connect with a much broader range of people from many different geographic areas, expanding your nursing network.

4. Participate digitally.

The words “class participation” probably conjure up images of raising your hand in class and speaking out loud to the group. While participation is definitely a part of online classes, it takes a different form. Usually, it means group forums where students host discussions on specific topics. It’s not the same as talking in person, but this format can actually be advantageous for quiet people who hate having to come up with comments on the fly. Due to the asynchronous nature of these message boards, you can read the discussion, take time to think it over, and post your comment when you’re ready.

5. Create a work from home space.

Even if you like to work from coffee shops or libraries, odds are that you’ll end up completing at least some of your classwork from home. If at all possible, try to create a work from home area outside your bedroom (you don’t want to associate schoolwork with your sleeping space). If that’s not possible, then at least set up a desk and chair so you’re not working from your bed. Try to place it near a window so you can take advantage of natural light. Be sure to set up some additional lamps, too, in case you end up working a lot at night.

6. Manage your time well.

Time management is one of the trickiest things for students to master during an online course, especially if the classes are pre-recorded and can be watched on-demand. Some people are distracted very easily, especially when working at home. They have every intention of watching that anatomy lecture and then end up spending an hour cleaning the house and folding laundry. Set aside blocks of time to work on your online classes and mark them off in your calendar, just like you would with an in-person class. Let your roommates or family know that you’re in school and ask them not to disturb you unless it’s an emergency.

7. Aim to turn your assignments in early.

Speaking of time management, turning in assignments early can help a lot with that. For in-person classes, you have to wait for the appointed day to turn in a physical paper. That’s not as much of a consideration for online classes. It’s a good idea to set a goal for yourself to turn in each assignment 1-2 days in advance. Even if you fall behind, which will happen eventually, you’ll still have that cushion built in so your assignment won’t truly be late.

8. Back up your work.

You should be doing this regardless of whether your nursing school classes are online or in person, but it’s doubly important for digital classes. Each week, if not each day, back up your work to an external hard drive as well as a cloud storage service such as Box, Dropbox, or Google Drive. If you must fill out quizzes or essays online, consider writing it in a separate document and then paste it into the field so you don’t lose your work if the submission doesn’t go through.

9. Ask for help.

Just because you’re physically alone in your house while you watch lectures doesn’t mean that you don’t have resources available to help. Your instructors should be able to help you via email, phone, or even video chat, and you also have your classmates to lean on. You might want to consider forming an online study group that meets regularly during Zoom calls to keep each other accountable. Don’t forget to explore any other resources offered for your classes, such as digital libraries.

Whether you’re taking online nursing classes by choice or not, digital courses are a new reality for today’s nursing students. Follow these nine strategies to knock your online nursing classes out of the park.

How Nurses Can Fight For Strong Ethics Amidst COVID-19

How Nurses Can Fight For Strong Ethics Amidst COVID-19

While industries attempt to address the spread of COVID-19, nurses have been working long hours, many times with insufficient personal protective equipment (PPE) and constantly changing state and federal requirements. They are also having to make ethical decisions about patient privacy, informing others of likely exposure, and patient treatment, and as the fight against the virus continues, we are seeing new and changing ethical issues arise.

The Code of Ethics for Nurses is the standard for ethical training and decision making, and is a resource that nurses are taught to know and implement. However, as the day to day operations of hospitals continue to be fraught with unexpected challenges, it is up to the frontline workers to fight for the ethical treatment of patients, families, and even themselves. As the front line personnel most intimately familiar with COVID-19 cases, nurses have a unique perspective on the effects that this pandemic is having on their communities and patients.

Knowing the available ethics resources, standing as an example of ethical conduct, and staying as up to date as possible on regulatory changes, are just the first steps in fighting for quality of care during this turbulent time. As a nurse in the midst of it, you can use the following tools to hold yourself, your colleagues, and your organization accountable.

Know Your Code of Ethics and Related Resources

The first step in being able to fight for strong ethical standards is knowing those standards yourself. Ethical nursing practices are taught using The Code of Ethics for Nurses, and there are now supplemental texts to deepen your understanding of how to apply them. Among them, The Code of Ethics for Nurses with Interpretive Statements, published in 2015, addresses especially difficult ethical situations such as crisis management and pandemics.

Staying up to date with the standardized documentation available will provide you with a framework for addressing new situations in conjunction with the help of your hospital or organization’s ethical resources. Organizational ethical support for nurses is a major necessity that your organization is obligated to provide, and institutions are not allowed to retaliate against nurses who bring concerns about their working conditions to management. These concerns may include unsafe exposure risks, physical safety, and the quality of ethical decision making by other personnel.

While simply knowing your ethical code cannot prepare you for all of the possible decisions you will have to make as a nurse, make sure to utilize the resources you can and bring any concerns to the attention of your organization’s management. By continuing to develop your understanding of ethical standards as they apply to the crises we are experiencing, you are better prepared to argue for both your and your patients’ safety.

Stay Up to Date and be Vocal

By staying as up to date as you can on your hospital’s current regulations, as well as government regulations, you can foster transparent communication between yourself and the organizations you interface with, making sure that you are working with the most recent information available. It is a difficult task as these regulations are changing daily, but keeping an eye on current regulatory requirements is important. This knowledge is the main factor in staying vocal in the workplace.

Addressing the ethical decisions of your colleagues can help save a patient’s life, limit spread to others in the hospital, and evaluate new symptoms of the virus. In the high-tension, high-stress situations that we are seeing right now, nurses are in a position to utilize strong ethical convictions and honesty to uphold their obligation to their patients and themselves. By staying vocal when you see a questionable decision made, bringing the information to management, and holding others accountable, you can be a force in maintaining an ethical workplace.

Part of ensuring the safety and well-being of patients is to ensure that those you work with are not endangering them. This could be simply a matter of fatigue, or of an inexperienced person attempting to complete a new procedure, but either could lead to a patient being injured or worse. Being aware of the ethical practices of those around you as well as their level of experience, is another way to help ensure that high-quality ethical practices are in place.

Stand as an Example

If you are working as a CNA, or in any other advanced position, new employees will look to you as an example of how to conduct themselves. After all, the codes of ethics apply not only to patient care, but to a nurse’s responsibilities to themselves and their team. By setting an active example for your colleagues, you can help create an environment founded on ethics that support the well-being of both patients and nurses.

There are basics of care that all nurses are trained in, including ways to protect a patient’s privacy, but we are experiencing a massive event that has taxed our medical system and its practitioners beyond any in recent history. Organizations are experiencing a lack of resources, personnel are working extremely long hours in high-risk environments, exhaustion is at a high, and newly trained medical professionals are being called on to make difficult decisions. In this environment, holding yourself to high ethical standards can help provide a path for others to follow.

Education, training, understanding, and action are all required to ensure the health and safety of patients, communities, and staff alike. While the mainstays of health and wellness are still important, the environment and stakes that medical professionals are working with have changed drastically. By fighting for ethical practices, you can become a part of the solution, and help ensure that patients, both yours and future ones, get the treatment that they deserve.

A Letter from the Road: A COVID-19 Crisis Nurse from San Quentin Prison Reports

A Letter from the Road: A COVID-19 Crisis Nurse from San Quentin Prison Reports

I’m doing laundry at a wash & fold in front of the house boats of Sausalito. Reminder: buy more scrubs. I’m one mile from from the hotel. Three minutes by car, 10 minutes by bicycle. The views are great. The weather is awesome. I could live here easy. Not on a house boat though.

They have a problem with the mating calls of some kind of small mud fish whose population has exploded. I guess it sounds terrible, like hammers on the hull all night long. Nature.

The hotel is a popular national chain brand in Mill Valley, gateway to Mount Tamalpais, and Muir Woods. It’s just north of San Francisco. I can just barely see Coit Tower. I’m maybe an hour and a half from my home so the commute would be brutal. The state is picking up the hotel tab thanks to a program authorized by the governor. It’s been a godsend.

The hotel is using the pandemic money to remodel. The room is nice, but there are sawzalls and hammers and loud Mariachi music playing during the day. At least I’m hardly ever there. They don’t clean the rooms as often because of the pandemic, but you can get fresh towels and coffee pods at the front desk any time.

The job is tedious, but not difficult. Basically, you make rounds on the prison population two times daily trying to root out COVID patients and separate them. I get there at 5:30 AM. There is a line to get through the gate. I have to sign four different log books in four different areas plus clock in with a time card.

We got a great tour of the prison on day one. The thing I remember the most is when the nurse educator guiding us said, “To everyone else they are prisoners, to us they are patients…all of them.” This dichotomy in mandates between prison staff and medical staff has allowed me to put the job neatly into my bailiwick. Nursing is nursing. The rest of it is for prison staff to handle.

The whole prison is on lock down. It’s quiet in the yards. It’s been grim. However there is hope. The numbers are improving. On my first day, there were over 1,300 patients in isolation. Two weeks later, the number is half of that. Everyone wears a mask. Infection control is taken seriously. Teams of nurses go out twice daily to assess the inmates. Other teams are doing COVID testing. Every staff member gets tested once per week. Cautiously, things are returning to a semblance of normalcy, whatever that means in a prison.

We pair up—an RN and an LVN—and grab our shoulder bag. Inside the bag is an IR thermometer, a pulse oximeter, a BP cuff, disposable PPE, alcohol wipes…sundries. When we get to our assigned area we put on the PPE and each team gets their own guard to keep them safe. “Don’t step into the cell, don’t put your face in front of the food port, don’t walk close to the cells…” Helpful advice and a sober reminder of the overlapping existence of prisoner and patient.

I’ve given careful thought to the nature of the job, the nature of crime and punishment, and the morally ambiguous task of providing competent health care to people who have committed terrible crimes. Thankfully, I’ve never followed crime stories. Having worked in the ER for many years, I’ve dealt exclusively with the aftermath of crime and the amelioration of its physical consequences…as best as can be done anyway. I have no curiosity about death row inmates. I can honestly say that I leave that at the door and look at each person strictly through the lens of health care. Having said that, I can tell from even the most cursory interactions with some of the patients that there are some seriously disturbed people within these walls. I’m happy to move along to lower level offenders.

From the ground, I can say the efforts to control the spread of COVID within the prison have been very successful. Again, I’m just the tip of the spear so the big picture is a little out of my view. But just judging from the numbers of patients I assess daily, things are improving very quickly. I guess that’s the benefit of working within a closed system…it was also that closed system that allowed the virus to spread so quickly in the first place, so there’s that. Wearing masks, social distancing, testing, contact tracing, quarantining…they have brought the cases of infection down so quickly that it’s possible that the job will end early. I’ll be sorry to leave. The pay is…generous.

The best part of the experience has been meeting new friends. Travel nurses are go-getters. I’ve met nurses from all over the world on this assignment. We share a common bond and have moved together from trepidation to confidence in this new role. We share stories in the break room and compare notes on our experience. Several nurses are staying in the same hotel that I am. It’s a great way to meet friends in our new socially isolated world. I hope that I have met lifelong friends here as I have on other contracts. The staff at the prison have been nothing but welcoming, same for my agency. A good experience from top to bottom.

The good news…or bad news depending on how you look at it, is that other prisons are experiencing similar outbreaks and will need COVID crisis teams to come in. There are already jobs being posted for other prisons in California. Susanville, San Lois Obispo, are two that I’ve seen. If you are interested in making some quick money, and are willing to shoulder some risk, I encourage you to contact a recruiter. The turnaround time for me was three days between first contact and clocking in. Be ready to move quickly. Have your documents together. The free hotel program is still in effect so your housing is covered. Stay safe out there.

Community Health Centers Offer a Lifeline

Community Health Centers Offer a Lifeline

Community health centers have taken on a big role in the nation’s healthcare as the COVID-19 pandemic has continued to impact the nation. Nurses who work in these centers find their skills in high demand.

According to the National Association of Community Health Centers (NACHC), federally funded centers provide essential access to primary care for people who may not be able to access it through traditional means. Whether there are barriers from language, income, lack of insurance, or transportation, these centrally located health centers remove many of those barriers to care.

Access to healthcare is especially important right now, as the coronavirus is having a devastating impact on communities that are predominantly of people of color and immigrants, and where people live in densely populated neighborhoods and homes. Many of these communities also have a high number of essential workers who must be out in the community daily—increasing the risks to their health and that of those around them. Some community centers provide care for rural areas, where there’s little access to healthcare, but still a high need. The Rural Health Information Hub offers a toolkit for healthcare workers in these areas.

The NACHC states that with the effective preventative care and emergency care, community health centers are able to divert people away from the emergency departments which may be their only viable healthcare option. In addition to healthcare, community health centers also offer or coordinate much needed services such as translation or interpreter services, transportation, and the case management of complex issues and conditions.

Staff also act as excellent community advocates and work to explain, distribute, and educate patients on health conditions, treatment options, home care, and disease management. By doing this, patients and their families can have better outcomes as they know how to manage all aspects of their health. Patients learn about any conditions or symptoms through education provided with a focus of culturally competent healthy practices and behaviors that will work for them.

As an affordable and viable option for approximately 29 million people in the United States, the nearly 1,400 community health center organizations nationwide provide a place where residents go for healthcare delivered by a staff that understands the specific details of their community and how those details can impact their health. Some states have organizations devoted to community healthcare, such as the Massachusetts League of Community Health Centers, that offer more information, resources, and history of these vital centers.

Nurses interested in a career working in community health can find out more through the American Public Health Association, an advocate for providing high-quality and effective public health options. A healthy community allows residents many more options, and community health centers help provide that lifeline.

From pregnancy and neonatal care to addiction or heart disease, community health nurses will see it all in their practices. It’s an excellent role for those who are committed to both lifelong learning and the foundation of a healthy community that is focused on equity.

Understanding Psoriasis

Understanding Psoriasis

Summertime leads to lots of skincare challenges, but for people with psoriasis skincare challenges are a year-round effort.

August brings attention to this skin condition with Psoriasis Action Month and Psoriasis Awareness Month.

According to the National Psoriasis Foundation (NPF), psoriasis is an “immune-mediated disease (a disease with an unclear cause that is characterized by inflammation caused by dysfunction of the immune system) that causes inflammation in the body.” The American Academy of Dermatology Association (AAD) explains that psoriasis is the body’s too-rapid production of skin cells, which cause the cells to pile up and form itchy and painful patches.

For people who have psoriasis, the disease is hardly simple. It causes extreme itching and discomfort physically, but it also brings emotional struggles as the patches can be large and red and will appear almost anywhere on the body.

Psoriasis isn’t contagious so people can’t catch it; however most people can’t tell what is causing such an inflamed reaction and so may assume they will contract a similar rash if they get too close. Covering up the patches helps hide them, but it doesn’t soothe the emotional toll of having a very visible skin condition.

According to the NPF, instead of the typical 30-day cycle in which skin cells will develop and shed, those with psoriasis can have that happen in 3 or 4 days. The rapid buildup of cells looks different on each person (and can vary depending on the type of psoriasis a person has) and can come and go in severity. Like many other autoimmune-type diseases, stress, other infections, or even a skin injury can trigger a flare up of symptoms. Cold, dry weather can worsen symptoms as can too much drinking or smoking.

Because this condition isn’t entirely localized, like a poison ivy rash would be, the systems involved in psoriasis can also lead to other conditions such as psoriatic arthritis, which may affect up to a third of sufferers.

There is no cure for psoriasis, but there are many treatments that people can try. If any of your patients have the condition, encourage them to try as many therapies are they are able to. Each kind of therapy will have a different outcome for each person, so what worked for one might not work for another. Currently, psoriasis treatment therapies may feature light therapy or topical creams or lotions.

More severe cases of psoriasis may involve more pervasive treatments that could include oral medications or infusion therapies that treat a wider range of body systems. And whether someone has a mild case or a more severe case of psoriasis, additional alternative therapies that work to prevent a flare up, reduce inflammation in the body, or help focus on pain management techniques are often useful.

If any of your patients have psoriasis, offer support through resources and compassion throughout the year. If you don’t know much about this condition, do some investigating in your daily nursing approach so you’ll understand it and can help educate others.

 

August Is National Breastfeeding Month

August Is National Breastfeeding Month

August is National Breastfeeding Month and is a good time for nurses to offer support and resources for families who want to make breastfeeding part of their lives.

According to the United States Breastfeeding Committee, “83 percent of U.S. infants receive breast milk at birth, only 25 percent are still exclusively breastfed at six months of age.” And while the benefits of breastfeeding are widely touted by the American Academy of Pediatrics and other organizations, not every family has equal access to resources or has a supportive environment in which breastfeeding can be sustained.

This month calls attention to the disparities that exist and can help families who choose breastfeeding to have better opportunities for education, support, and resources.

On August 27, from 11:30 am to 1 pm EDT, BirthNet will host the lunchtime discussion, Celebrating Black Breastfeeding and How Doulas Can Help. The panel discussion will address using doulas to help families through some of the challenges they find, especially during the times when COVID-19 can bring even more barriers to finding support when they need it.

Most babies and mothers reap health benefits associated with breastfeeding. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics those include some infant and childhood protection against:

  • bacteremia
  • diarrhea
  • respiratory tract infection
  • necrotizing enterocolitis
  • otitis media
  • urinary tract infection
  • late-onset sepsis in preterm infants
  • type 1 and type 2 diabetes
  • lymphoma, leukemia, and Hodgkins disease
  • childhood overweight and obesity

Mothers also find benefits include a faster uterine recovery, decreased bleeding, faster postpartum weight loss, and some risk reduction of ovarian and breast cancer.

Nurses can continue to offer support to moms who are beginning the process or those who want to continue and are having a hard time doing so. While breastfeeding is a natural method of feeding, it isn’t always easy. Frustration, pain, and exhaustion can derail even the most determined parent. But supportive care—from a nurse, a friend, family member, or a professional—can make the path to continue a little easier. When parents find reliable and effective advice, emotional support, and encouragement, they may be more inclined to continue.

As a nurse, even if you aren’t an ob/gyn specialist, you can help support families who want to breastfeed by helping them find resources within your organization. General supportive conversation if they are finding breastfeeding more challenging than they realized or guiding them toward breast pumps, pillows, nursing clothing, salves, or support groups can sometimes be all that’s needed.

As a professional, you can also advocate for breastfeeding rights including workplace rights for working parents, equal access to resources and support, and general acceptance of breastfeeding.

The Healthy Newborn Network offers a Breastfeeding Advocacy Toolkit that offers ideas on everything from funding to workplace policies aimed at making breastfeeding easier and more sustainable for many different lifestyles and scenarios.

Celebrate and support families this week during National Breastfeeding Month.

9 Tips for Nurses to Stay Positive and Prevent Burnout

9 Tips for Nurses to Stay Positive and Prevent Burnout

Nurses work as superheroes every day, and the high-performance demands of this profession can lead to side effects such as exhaustion, anxiety, and constant stress. However, as leaders in health care, nurses can choose the way they approach their roles and thrive.

Below are nine strategies that can help nurses manage stress and stay positive all year long.

1.     Make Self-Care a Priority

Nurses are inclined to focus on the needs of others. However, the American Nurses Association explains, “Self-care is imperative to personal health and professional growth, serving as sustenance to continue to care for others.” Nurses should make a point to squeeze in at least one self-care activity that makes them happy every day, such as drinking a hot cup of tea or taking a bubble bath.

2.     Spend Time With Positive People

When work life feels hopeless, nurses can benefit from reaching out to others to gain some positive energy. Increasing social contact and venting to a good listener are great ways to relieve stress and calm anxious nerves. Sharing work concerns, problems, or thoughts with loved ones can also help build trust and strengthen these relationships.

3.     Set Aside Relaxation Time

Practicing daily relaxation techniques, such as prayer, meditation, yoga, or deep breathing, can help nurses achieve a state of restfulness. However, it takes daily practice to reap the full benefits. Getting into a habit of engaging in regular relaxation time can lead to improvements in overall health and happiness. These beginner-friendly guided meditations only take five minutes a day.

4.     Begin the Day With Positive Self-Talk

Daily positive affirmations, also known as self-talk, can have a significant influence on how we react to our environment, jobs, and other people. Making a habit of this can help increase self-esteem and reduce feelings of anxiety and depression. For instance, write a positive affirmation and keep it handy at work to refer to when starting to feel overwhelmed.

5.     Keep a Consistent Exercise Routine

Regular exercise is an excellent way to manage nursing stress and work burnout. As the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention points out, at least 30 minutes of daily physical activity helps to improve mental health, cognitive function, and quality of sleep, as well as decreases depression and the risk of many cardiac diseases.

6.     Just Say No to Extra Shifts

Nurses are often eager to assist when someone asks for help. However, working longer hours and agreeing to take on more shifts than necessary can lead to burnout and even compromise patients’ safety. On the other hand, saying no to extra work means saying yes to more meaningful things in life. This could mean more quality time with family, outdoor nature hikes, or starting a new hobby. Plus, when we achieve a better work-life balance, we become more effective as nurses.

7.     Take a Break from Social Media and News

When away from work, set a time each day to completely disconnect from social media, technical gadgets, and the news. Aim to also turn off cell phones, put away the laptop, and stop checking email. Instead, try spending some time outdoors, breathing in fresh air while doing something physically active and enjoyable.

8.     Aim for 8 Hours of Sleep

Getting enough sleep every day is paramount—particularly for nurses. An article from health.gov discusses several benefits of sleep. This includes an elevated mood, reduced feelings of stress, improved cognitive function, and better maintenance of a healthy weight. Therefore, it’s important to make time for a few calming activities to help unwind after a stressful day.

9.     Start a Gratitude Journal

Writing about what we’re thankful for can encourage feelings of optimism and boost overall  well-being. Gratitude journaling works by adjusting our focus, and changing how we perceive situations over time. This type of writing allows us to see more of the world around us, deepening our appreciation for the things and experiences we have.

Conclusion

Stress and overwhelm are an inevitable part of every nurse’s life. However, developing healthy habits and coping strategies can help reduce feelings of burnout and boost resilience. Try to implement a few of these actionable steps every week to maintain a better work-life balance and improve overall health.

Black Men and the Dilemma of Wearing Masks During the COVID-19 Pandemic

Black Men and the Dilemma of Wearing Masks During the COVID-19 Pandemic

On April 3, 2020, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) made a statement encouraging all Americans to wear cloth face coverings upon leaving their homes. In response, Black men have expressed their concern about such a recommendation. Their concern is based in that wearing masks could expose them to racial profiling and harassment from law enforcement officers. An example of such concern can be seen in the Twitter posting of Aaron Thomas, a Black man living in Ohio: “I don’t feel safe wearing a handkerchief or something else that isn’t CLEARLY a protective mask covering my face to the store because I am a Black man living in this world. I want to stay alive but I also want to stay alive.” Such a tweet has been reposted more than 18,000 times since its original posting.  Based on his statement, Thomas has decided to not wear a mask so that he can “stay alive.”

This concern has not been unwarranted. A month before the CDC provided its recommendation, two Black men posted a video of themselves on YouTube being escorted out of a Walmart in Wood River, Illinois by a police officer for allegedly “wearing surgical masks.” One of the men stated that: “[The policeman] followed us from outside, told us that we cannot wear masks. This police officer just put us out for wearing masks and trying to stay safe.” The chief of the Wood River police, Brad Wells, stated later in a news release that the police officer in the video “incorrectly” told such men that a city law prohibited the wearing of masks. Chief Wells went on to state: “This statement was incorrect and should not have been made. The city does not have such an ordinance prohibiting the wearing of a mask. In fact, I support the wearing of nonsurgical mask or face covering when in public during the COVID-19 pandemic period.” As a result of the two men filling a complaint, Chief Wells told The Washington Post that an internal investigation of the incident has begun with the assistance of the local NAACP branch.

Georgia Senator, Nikema Williams, wrote a letter to the state’s governor urging him to temporarily suspend the mask laws. She explains why in her letter, stating that her husband, who is African American, 6’3”, and weighs 300 pounds: “was telling [her] how uncomfortable it was to wear a mask in stores because folks get intimidated and look at him like he’s up to no good.”

Black men have also experienced racial profiling when not wearing a mask. In April of 2020, a video from Philadelphia filmed a Black man being removed with force by four police officers one day after the city’s transportation authority required all riders of buses, trolleys, and trains to wear face coverings. After the incident, the transportation authority made an announcement deeming face coverings no longer required for riders.

Therefore, it has been found that both Black men who follow and do not follow the CDC recommendation to wear a face covering have experienced episodes of harassment. Blacks are already at an increased risk of contracting the virus, but now Black men in particular are faced with the dilemma to wear a mask to save their lives from either racial profiling or the raging COVID-19 pandemic.

Like several senators, the NAACP has also made a statement urging states to indefinitely stop their mask laws. Marc Banks, the NAACP’s national press secretary, stated: “No person should be fearful of engaging in lifesaving measures due to racialism.”

Melanye Price is a political science professor at Texas’ Prairie View A&M University. She tells The New York Times that the well-intentioned recommendation to wear masks or bandanas actually can put African Americans at greater risk of racial profiling. According to Kevin Gaines, a professor of civil rights and social justice at the University of Virginia, Black men are already being profiled by the police on a regular basis, but wearing masks heightens such risks of profiling. The initial assumption is not made that Black men are wearing masks to protect themselves and those around them from the threat of the virus. However, in contrast, it is assumed that they are engaging in some type of ill will like stealing or other crimes.

As a result of the risks of racial profiling, some Black men have changed their style of dress in an effort to appear less threatening. STAT correspondent Usha Lee McFarling reports that Black men have attempted to “tone down their appearance to lower suspicion.” Examples of such “toning down” comes in the form of wearing college T-shirts and “dressing like prospects, not suspects.” This has even been found in their choice of mask colors and patterns, choosing floral prints or plain white masks over others.

Vickie Mays, a professor of heath policy and management at UCLA, has been attempting to track situations in which Black men wearing masks have suffered harassment. Mays tells STAT that Black men should wear masks despite the risk of racial profiling in order to, foremost, protect their health. However, she suggests that such masks not be dark in color or “ominous looking.” Instead, she suggests they be bright in color or have traditional African prints. Mays also urges health officials to swiftly procure professionally-made masks for Black communities just as they would any other commodity like food or water as this population has been reportedly experiencing greater rates of COVID-19 infection than non-minority groups.

Job Search: What to Know Before You Begin

Job Search: What to Know Before You Begin

Embarking on a job search is often an exciting, and yet exhausting process. Beginning a new role, especially one that matches your professional and personal goals, reminds you of why you started a career in nursing and can restart your passion for what you do.

But a job search takes a lot of work, so some preparation before you begin will save you time and will help you find a good match for your skills and your own needs (a higher salary, a shorter commute, a new location).

Minority Nurse recently caught up with Anne Jessie, DNP, RN, and president-elect of the American Academy of Ambulatory Care Nursing (AAACN), for some tips for nurses who are thinking of making the big move and starting a job search.

Q: Should nurses do any kind of self-evaluation or career evaluation before they begin a job search?

A: Yes. Self-reflection is always helpful. It is important to spend time thinking about why you think a job change may be needed or desired. Are you stuck in a place without opportunity? Is the company you currently work for unstable? Is there an unanticipated career opportunity that is too good to pass up? Once you determine your motivation for doing a job search, ranking the following areas in order of importance can be helpful in narrowing your search.

  • Company culture
  • New level of responsibility
  • Opportunity for growth within the new company or new job role
  • Pay and benefits
  • Company stability

 

Q: What is the best way to get organized and think about a job search?

A:  Ask yourself what you have enjoyed doing most throughout your career, what you’d prefer never to do again, and what areas of career growth opportunities you may have identified. This self-exploration should help you to picture your ideal role more clearly.

  • Browse job postings for the different types of roles that align with your identified career goals. Are the responsibilities described in the postings appealing and do you meet most of the qualifications?
  • Edit your resume so that prospective employers will understand what type of position you are seeking and how your experience aligns. You may need to edit the content depending on the job you are seeking. Highlight accomplishments and experiences that are most transferrable, listing the most recent and pertinent to the posting at the top of your resume.
  • Create a one-page cover letter template that identifies the position you are applying for and clearly demonstrates that you have done research on the company–for example, mention a recent company accomplishment or news story. This template can easily be customized to each job role you apply for. Address the letter to the hiring manager, recruiter, or human resource representative at the company.
  • Identify 3-5 people to be your references and ask them if they would be willing to speak to your skills. Consider present colleagues, professors, or supervisors.
  • After participating in a job interview, write an amazing thank you note within 24 hours of the interview.

 

Q: What are the best tools to use in a job search and what makes each one distinctive — for instance LinkedIn, networking, job boards, alma maters.

A:  First, consider all your resources: General nurse recruiting websites or agencies, and nursing specialty job boards like AAACN’s Career Center, or those offered by the Organization for Nurse Leaders. Networking is, of course, one of the best ways to find a new position. I’ve heard our AAACN nurses say they found a new job after they joined one of our Special Interest Groups (SIGs), and I see job discussions frequently in our online community. Such new connections can help a nurse discover an area of practice they didn’t know about or had never even considered.

Second, create or optimize your LinkedIn profile. It should be an extension of your resume and cover letter, and should include a professional profile photo and engaging summary that highlights your skills, career achievements, and accomplishments. Also, include volunteer experience as appropriate, as well as education and professional certifications. Maintain your presence by regularly posting and commenting so you appear active and engaged.

Social media can also be a positive platform if used to contribute to conversations regarding timely health care topics. Ensure that you refrain from engaging in conversations that could be considered controversial. Also, make sure your profiles on Facebook, Instagram, and other platforms are set to private.

 

Q:  Should recently graduated nurses conduct a job search in a different way from a more experienced nurse? Are there better approaches for nurses in different stages of a career?

A:  While knowledge, skills, and attitudes are important, a positive attitude and ability to communicate flexibility in the acceptance of job assignments is key for the new grad. Content and processes can always be taught, but a positive attitude in an employee can sometimes be hard to find. Take full advantage of job fairs that are organized by your nursing school as well as healthcare systems recruitment events. Employers who offer nurse residency programs as part of orientation and onboarding are committed to hiring new graduates and investing in them as long-term employees.

 

Q:  Is there anything about this time when so many processes are remote, that can impact a job search positively or negatively?

A:   The biggest impact is the uncertainty of the impact from COVID-19 on the job market. Many organizations have suspended hiring and have temporarily furloughed nurses. That said, facilities that offer remote work such as nurse call centers have been vital to providing virtual clinical support to vulnerable populations and have expanded during this unprecedented time in health care.

We’ve seen this trend reflected in a jump in demand for AAACN’s telehealth resources and the networking among our AAACN members who practice telehealth. I think telehealth is going to continue to grow significantly in coming years because its value will remain even when COVID-19 has been tamed.

 

Q:  How can a nurse prepare to use this time as an advantage?

A:  Self-educate and develop skills that support patient engagement, mutual goal setting, and motivational interviewing that promote patient self-care management. AAACN’s Care Coordination and Transition Management (CCTM) resources can assist in developing these skills and competencies. These skills are especially critical when working with patients virtually but can translate to any work environment to ensure improved disease management and quality outcomes.

 

 

 

Setting Boundaries as a Nurse Working with COVID Patients

Setting Boundaries as a Nurse Working with COVID Patients

When you were in nursing school, your professors and your mentors undoubtedly warned you about the hard times. They said you’d be tested. They told you there would be times when you wanted to quit, times when you just didn’t think you had the strength to go on.

But no one could have prepared you for the test that is COVID-19. In your worst dreams, you never could have seen this coming.

Now it’s here, though. And you’re slogging through one day, one hour, sometimes one minute at a time. But with infection rates surging, there doesn’t seem to be an end in sight, at least not anytime soon.

If you’re going to make it, then you’re going to have to take care of you. And that begins by setting boundaries, even with your precious COVID patients and their families.

Claiming Your Right to Self-Care

As a nurse, it probably feels only natural to put other people first. It’s what you do every working day of your life, after all. And that habit likely doesn’t change when you’re off the clock.

That’s not a healthy or sustainable way to live in the best of circumstances. Lack of self-care, especially as a result of overwork, can take a devastating toll not only on your physical health but also on your mental and emotional health. It’s also debilitating to your relationships, those emotional support systems that keep you strong in body, mind, and spirit.

One of the greatest risks, of course, is that the demands placed on you as a pandemic nurse is that you might easily lapse into work addiction. You might find yourself unwilling, or even unable, to leave your work behind you when you come home. You might feel as if the only “right” or “noble” thing to do is to work yourself beyond all reason, giving yourself wholly to your work, supposedly for the sake of your patients but, really, for the sake of your addiction.

But whether you are simply facing extreme overwork, or you are falling into a full-fledged work addiction, as a nurse in the age of coronavirus, failure to practice self-care by nurturing your mental health isn’t just hurtful, it’s downright destructive. Right now, you are bearing physical, mental, and emotional burdens that you never thought possible.

Recognizing the signs that you are struggling and you need help is neither weakness nor selfishness. It means valuing yourself as much as you value those under your care. It means allowing yourself the right to the same kind of love and care that you give your patients. It means taking care of yourself so that you can take care of them.

But How?

You’ve probably been taking care of others for so long that you’ve forgotten how to prioritize your own needs. You might never have learned how to protect your well-being by setting boundaries. When you have boundaries, you’re going to have more emotional energy and a stronger sense of agency and power, something that this pandemic has taken from far too many of us.

Setting boundaries, though, is not rocket science and it doesn’t have to be hard. You can start simply, by ensuring that when you’re off the clock, you’re actually off the clock. That means that when you get home, you need to turn off all the COVID coverage and you need to let yourself be taken care of for a while.

If you’ve been working with COVID patients, unfortunately, you’re probably not going to be comfortable being physically close to your family and loved ones. But you can still let them nurture you from a distance. Get your kids to make dinner and do the laundry. Have your spouse draw you a warm bath and turn your bathroom into the perfect spa retreat.

Above all, make it clear that no pandemic talk is allowed unless and until you want and are ready to share. And that also means resisting the urge to constantly check on your patients. For the sake of your physical and mental health, when you are off duty, you must do your utmost to get away from thoughts of the virus and to nurture yourself, instead, with the things that you love in the best way you can.

Get Out(side)

Setting boundaries as a COVID nurse means standing up for your right to take time away. Scheduling a weekend getaway to the outdoors is good for your physical health, reducing your stress, and boosting your immunity. But it’s also ideal for your mental health, helping you to rest and decompress, to calm your mind and regroup.

Studies show that spending time in nature can help nurses build resiliency and avoid burnout. And there’s never been a greater need for that than right now.

Seeking Help

No one needs to tell you that the pandemic is one of the worst health crises in modern history. You’ve been on the frontlines for months now. You know the score. And because you know the score, you also know that this crisis isn’t something you can, or should, handle alone.

If you are 65 or older and have Medicare, you likely qualify for mental health care coverage. And if you’re covered under your employer, then mental health benefits are also likely included in your group insurance plan. On the other hand, if you’re uninsured or your plan doesn’t include mental health benefits, you can still reach out for free or low-cost care in your community.

The Takeaway

Nurses are superheroes and the world knows it now more than ever. But even superheroes need caring for. And that begins, above all, with recognizing your right to self-nurturing and setting the boundaries you need to ensure that the one who cares for everyone else finally gets the TLC she or he deserves.