7 Attributes of a Successful DNP Student

7 Attributes of a Successful DNP Student

Enrolling in a Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) program can be a daunting task for many students due to the rigorous academic requirements often associated with it. Although DNP school can be intimidating, students who choose to enroll not only embrace the significance of pursuing higher education but also the possibility of advancing their roles as prominent health care leaders in the nursing profession. As a DNP candidate myself, I’ve grown to appreciate the triumph and struggles associated with pursuing a terminal degree. Therefore, I believe students who are considering pursuing their DNP degree must harness these seven attributes to ensure that they are not only readily prepared but also successful in their scholastic endeavors.

1. Clear Vision

Setting a vision and goal for the future is vital for success in the DNP program. Possessing a clear vision is necessary because it helps you organize your individual objectives and helps you maintain accountability throughout the program. If choosing to enroll in DNP school perfectly aligns with your personal and professional goals, having a vision that is well defined will not only help you focus on your objectives but also create a sense of purpose that ultimately becomes your own measurement for success.

2. Ability to Prioritize

Students who know what and how to prioritize tend to be more successful in DNP school because they know how to differentiate tasks as either critical or noncritical. One of the best ways to prioritize in DNP school is by looking over the program and course objectives of each class and determine which tasks need to be completed first. By knowing how to prioritize your tasks wisely you will not only be able to minimize stress but also maximize results more effortlessly and efficiently.

3. Effective Time Management Skills

Possessing excellent time management skills is an important trait prior to beginning DNP school because of the high academic workload associated with pursuing a doctoral degree. Managing your time effectively will allow you to accomplish more tasks in a shorter period of time and help lower your stress and increase your concentration and attention. To ensure that your time is properly managed, it helps to keep a written or electronic record, diary, or calendar to ensure that you know what tasks are required and when they must be completed.

4. Strong Work Ethic

Maintaining a strong work ethic is essential in determining your overall success in DNP school. Students who possess a strong work ethic understand that success can only be achieved by practicing the ideals of discipline and hard work on a regular basis. To maintain a strong work ethic, it is vital to practice positive habits consistently every day so that hard work is almost automatic. Forming respectable habits such as exercising daily, staying punctual, maintaining your obligations, and finishing tasks immediately help establish your credibility and image as a doctorally prepared nurse.

5. Healthy Work-Life Balance

While it is important to study and work hard in DNP school, it is equally important to create a healthy work-life balance and set aside much needed time for yourself and your loved ones. Learning how to care for yourself is extremely important in DNP school as working too much can ultimately cause you to become overwhelmed, overworked, and overstressed. To avoid this, it is best that you take consistent breaks throughout the day to maintain your overall well-being. Learning how to take ample rest breaks is vital to ensure your physical, mental, and emotional health is adequately cared for in DNP school.

6. An Understanding that Excellence is a Lifelong Process

One of the key principles that DNP students must understand is that excellence is a lifelong process. Understanding this concept is vital because sustainable success in DNP school and in life is not something that is built overnight but rather an extended period of time. As leaders in the nursing realm, DNP students must understand that sustainable excellence requires constant monitoring, learning, and improvement with the realization that the journey is just as important as the destination.

7. Perpetual Curiosity

DNP students who remain perpetually curious are more susceptible to success because curiosity not only propels innovation but also self-reflection. Fostering your curiosity in DNP school is essential because it allows you to be fully present in the moment. Curious people are not only happier but also more successful because they are non-blaming, non-shaming, supportive, and focused on exploring options to find the best solution that supports collaboration and innovation.

The Role of Nursing in Leveraging Public Health Awareness

The Role of Nursing in Leveraging Public Health Awareness

Public health is an important aspect in the nursing profession because it involves addressing medical illnesses on a global scale. Due to the aging population and the advancement of medical technologies, public health nurses are vital in developing and providing skilled nursing care aimed at promoting preventative measures to increase the global health of the population. It is this understanding that fuels public health nurses to continue their efforts to not only educate society about certain illnesses, but also promote healthy lifestyles across the patient gamut.

What is Public Health?

According to the Public Health Institute, public health is defined as “the science and practice of protecting and improving the health of a community, as by preventative medicine, health education, control of communicable diseases, application of sanitary measures, and monitoring of environmental hazards.” The focus of increasing public health awareness is significant especially in today’s society because of the growing paradigm shift towards preventative care versus diagnostic care. In addition to this, public health awareness also requires a collaborative and multidisciplinary effort consisting of physicians, epidemiologists, statisticians, and dietary professionals. This interprofessional collaboration is vital because it involves gathering a sizeable amount of clinical data to effectively screen and prevent a disease from adversely affecting the general public.

The Impact of Nursing in Public Health

The impact of nurses in supporting public health efforts is invaluable because of their strong emphasis on health promotion and disease prevention. Nurses not only possess the proficiencies but also competencies to tackle the burden of health determinants and the various environmental and behavioral factors associated with it. Subsequently, nurses must have the skillset to proactively confront these challenges within an individual and societal context. In order to evaluate these activities, nurses must be diligent in both planning and implementing to ensure public health concerns are addressed directly. Finally, nurses who are actively involved in lobbying for societal and structural reform are then able to promote effectual health care strategies aimed at reducing negative health outcomes associated with poor health decisions and a lack of knowledge.

Why is Public Health Important?

Due to the health care industry shifting towards more preventive care strategies, nurses continue to play a major role in leveraging public health awareness. By identifying and monitoring health concerns that may affect entire communities, public health nurses are uniquely qualified to not only advocate, but also promote societal change to safeguard the health and well-being of all individuals around the world. Therefore, a nurse’s role in health promotion includes various responsibilities related to advocating, enabling, and mediating activities to ensure salubrious decisions equate to healthier outcomes.

The Moral and Ethical Dilemma of Physician-Assisted Suicide

The Moral and Ethical Dilemma of Physician-Assisted Suicide

According to the American Medical Association (AMA), physician-assisted suicide (PAS) is defined when “a physician facilitates a patient’s death by providing the necessary means and/or information to enable the patient to perform the life-ending act.” A variety of terms have historically been used to describe an event when a physician uses lethal medications on a terminally ill patient for the purpose of easing their suffering. The term “physician-assisted suicide” was conceptualized to accurately reflect the relationship between the doctor and patient while denoting the etymological roots of suicide as “auto-killing” or “self-killing.” After years of courtroom and political battles, California, Colorado, the District of Columbia, Montana, Oregon, Vermont, and Washington are the only U.S. states that currently allow PAS as a result of the Death With Dignity Act enacted in 1997. As of January 1, 2019, Hawai’i will be added to that list.

Public Policy

The perception of PAS is a highly controversial topic within the nursing profession because it centers on the decision of terminating a human life to ease physical and emotional agony. For centuries, issues related to PAS have been zealously debated, with neither advocates nor opponents gaining much ground. Currently, those who favor PAS view the process as a peaceful and painless death while those who oppose it believe that the consequence of any form of suicide will ultimately result in irreparable legal and ethical ramifications. With recent societal and technological advancements in science and medicine, choices involving both life and death have become much more complicated in recent years. As a result of this worldwide controversy in health care, many nurses nationwide are now forced to deal with this ethical dilemma head on.

Risks and Benefits

Like many controversial topics in contemporary society, there are numerous risks and benefits nurses must be familiar with when it comes to justifying PAS. Those who support PAS argue that people should have the right to choose the timing and manner of their death in the event of an adverse clinical aftermath. Proponents of PAS strongly believe that allowing a patient to needlessly suffer can cause additional pain and distress, which can ultimately eliminate whatever shred of dignity the patient may possess. As a result of this realization, many proponents believe that PAS can provide patients with a unique treatment alternative to their incessant agony.

Despite the urgings of proponents however, many opponents argue that the sanctity of human life should be continually honored and respected in spite of physical or emotional discomfort. The argument contends that only God Himself has the authority to give and take life, and that individuals should not be allowed to take any life, including their own.

Lastly, the potential for PAS is tremendously high in vulnerable populations because of their lack of access to quality health care. Since PAS may become a cost-containment strategy that can lead to serious litigation if not performed properly, opponents strongly forbid PAS to stop these abuses from occurring.

The Impact of Nursing in Physician-Assisted Suicide

PAS is an exceptionally controversial issue because it encompasses both legal and medical ramifications centered on the individual’s unique moral and ethical principles. With the ever-expanding ability to both prolong and end life, nurses must not only remain cognizant but also prepared for any and all repercussions associated with life and death situations.

The Impact of Nursing Screening Strategies on Suicide Prevention

The Impact of Nursing Screening Strategies on Suicide Prevention

Suicide is a rising epidemic in today’s contemporary society. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), globally nearly one million people die each year at their hands, by an act of suicide and more than thirty thousand people die annually in the United States alone. Since the risk for suicide is largely determined on a continuum, the severity of suicidality can vary with individual circumstances. Because of this realization, nurses play a pivotal role in suicide prevention because they often have the greatest number of opportunities to identify and recognize suicidal patients and tendencies in the health care arena.

Suicide Screening Strategies

While many hospitals are working diligently to comply with the Joint Commission in implementing suicide-screening questions, there is limited evidence available to guide suicide risk initiatives in the inpatient clinical setting. To help resolve this issue, researchers developed the Ask Suicide-Screening Questions to Everyone in Medical Settings tool (asQ’em), aimed to identify suicidality in the inpatient units and subspecialties. The asQ’em two-item screening tool is a unique instrument designed specifically for nurses to administer to medical-surgical patients at risk for suicidal tendencies and predispositions. Due to the straightforward nature of the asQ’em suicide-screening questionnaire, researchers have found it to be an efficacious method in properly recognizing suicidality in susceptible patients across the health care setting.

Applicability in the Clinical Setting

Although suicide risk assessments are an essential tool in the hospital setting, there is a growing body of evidence suggesting the underutilization of suicide screenings among medical-surgical patients. As a psychiatric-mental health nurse, I understand the importance of assessing patients for suicidality because it provides me with vital information on how to properly care for patients suffering from suicidal thoughts.

The asQ’em suicide-screening questionnaire is a tremendous tool that can be easily implemented in all inpatient units because it consists of two questions that determine if patients are at risk for suicide as a result of their present thoughts or past behaviors. Based on their answers, nurses can consequently determine if the patient exhibits enough significant emotional distress to ensure proper safety measures are in place before subsequent inpatient treatment and stabilization.

As a result of this realization, increased efforts must be made to ensure suicide-screening tools are readily available to not only uncover meaningful clinical data but also promote safe holistic nursing practices to preserve the health and well-being of suicidal patients nationwide.

The 5 Steps to Becoming a Transformational Nurse Leader

The 5 Steps to Becoming a Transformational Nurse Leader

Due to the ever-evolving nature of health care in contemporary society, more and more nurses are being looked upon as transformational nurse leaders among the scientific community. If you are interested in becoming a transformational nurse leader yourself, here are the five steps you must take to inspire change among your patients and your colleagues alike.

1. Set a Vision

Having a vision is an essential characteristic of a transformational nurse leader because it addresses the “why” and “how” of their actions. Transformational nurse leaders must not only be inspirational but also courageous in conveying their unique beliefs and viewpoints in order to bring their vision to life.

2. Foster Creativity

It’s imperative for potential transformational nurse leaders to foster creativity because it encourages innovation and adaptation to change. The transformational leadership style is vital to this approach because it identifies areas in which change is required while inspiring followers to embrace innovation in the clinical setting.

3. Communicate Effectively

A transformational nurse leader who communicates effectively not only focuses on what other individuals are attempting to convey but also essential themes important to those individuals. Effectual communicators adapt their communication style based on each individual’s ability to process and comprehend the interaction successfully despite cultural and socioeconomic differences.

4. Inspire Positive Change

To become a successful transformational nurse leader, an individual must also be charismatic and inspire real positive change across generational gaps. A transformational nurse leader must know how to inspire change because it not only promotes self-reliance but also trust in others to commit to their vision.

5.  Be a Role Model

Lastly, knowing how to be a role model is a crucial trait of the transformational nurse leader because it motivates others to become better versions of themselves. Nurses who are not only transparent but also honest embody the value of integrity that is vital in promoting trust among their followers. Leaders who display integrity are consistent when it comes to their actions, values, and expectations and are considered reliable and trustworthy. Therefore, individuals who yearn to be transformational nurse leaders must be willing to demonstrate their commitment to excellence by striving to become a positive example to those around them.