Neonatal Nurses Save Babies

Neonatal Nurses Save Babies

Neonatal nurses sum up their work very succinctly. As the theme of 2017’s Neonatal Nurses Day, celebrated every September 15, states “We Save Babies!”

Sponsored by the National Association of Neonatal Nurses (NANN), the “We Save Babies!” theme resonates with this clinical specialty of nurses who work with the tiniest patients.

Neonatal nurses care for babies who are born so early or with conditions or infections that just a mere decade ago they might not have survived. In fact, according to NANN, survival rates for these patients are 10 times better than they were 15 years ago. Preemies born months too early who barely fit in a hand are now able to survive, but the journey is often treacherous. These nurses might also care for newborns who have birth defects or who were born with life-threatening health problems. Some babies become ill or develop an infection shortly after birth and neonatal nurses care for these babies, too.

This specialty of nursing is very specialized and neonatal nurses are trained to watch for the smallest challenges that can face these newborns. Preemies are faced with a range of potential problems because they didn’t have enough time to fully develop in the womb. They might have breathing problems from underdeveloped lungs, difficulties taking and digesting food, and are often unable to regulate their body temperature. Neonatal nurses’ training prepares them to monitor all the smallest fluctuations in a baby’s health and vital signs.

For families of these babies, neonatal nurses are a lifeline to their babies. Nurses and families often become close as the nurses care for the babies and also help inform the families of how to care for their infants as well. Nurses help families cope with the emotional toll of having a sick newborn and have an impact on families that is often life-long.

Nurses who are interested in this field need experience with infants and children and that should include work in a level lll neonatal intensive care unit, according to NANN. With a current RN designation and work in the field that includes at least 2000 hours in the specialty in a 24-month period, you can obtain RNC Neonatal Intensive Care Nursing certification (RNC-NIC) through the National Certification Corporation.

As neonatal nurses are celebrated today, you can check out videos on NANN’s Facebook page from the people who have been touched by the life-saving skill and care given to their babies when they were in their most fragile state. Take photos of your unit to post on social media and tag them with #NeonatalNursesDay. Let people know of this challenging career choice and the incredible rewards it offers.

Thank a Nephrology Nurse!

Thank a Nephrology Nurse!

The compassionate work and care of all nurses deserves to be celebrated, and throughout the year, different branches of the nursing profession get the chance to spotlight their unique duties.

This week, September 10 to 17, is National Nephrology Nurses Week, sponsored by the American Nephrology Nurses Association (ANNA), and honors the work nurses do with patients who have kidney disease or are at risk for impaired kidney function.

The need in this area is great. According to the National Kidney Foundation, one in seven adults has chronic kidney disease. Many people don’t realize they have a current disease and many of those who are at risk are also unaware.

Many sub-specialties exist within nephrology nursing, so nurses in this area have many choices. To advance their careers and gain more knowledge, nurses can become certified through the Nephrology Nursing Certification Commission in becoming a nephrology nurse nurse practitioner, a certified nephrology nurse, or a certified dialysis nurse (several technical certifications exist as well).

With a varied and diverse population, nephrology nurses work with all ages of patients from the youngest patients to the oldest. They can work in healthcare settings ranging from hospitals to home care, but may also choose to pursue research, policy work in government, or a position in academia.

Renal disease can impact anyone, so nurses become comfortable helping patients with prevention, with deciding on treatment options, and guiding them to administer self care and monitoring. And while many patients are relieved to know their kidney disease can be managed, sometimes the care options (like needing dialysis) are a daunting prospect when patients first hear it. They rely on the compassionate, professional, and expert nursing care to help understand and adapt to their diagnosis. Nephrology nurses must have broad knowledge and care for the whole body as kidney function impacts so many physical systems.

Many kidney patients have additional conditions making their care especially complex, so a nurse who wants to get into the nephrology field needs to be able to work comfortably on a team to understand the complexities of care.

In a public letter celebrating National Nephrology Nurses Week, Alice Hellebrand, MSN, RN, CNN, and 2017-2018 ANNA president, said, “Nephrology nurses use their vision, knowledge, and skills to take action and improve patient outcomes. They make a positive difference in the lives of patients and their families every day. Individuals with kidney failure rely on the skills, knowledge, and expertise of nephrology nurses to ensure the safety and effectiveness of their life-saving care.”

Thanks to all the nephrology nurses out there!

Honoring Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Nurses

Honoring Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Nurses

With September designated as Childhood Cancer Awareness Month, it’s especially fitting to recognize the nurses who care for these young patients with a day to honor their compassionate work.

September 8 marks Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Nurse Day, the fifth such celebration of its kind. Spearheaded by the Association of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Nurses (APHON), the day recognizes the work of caring for children, teens, and young adults who have cancer or blood disorders. In addition, the nurses are also supports and sources of knowledge for the families and loved ones of these children who have been diagnosed with life-threatening and life-changing diseases and disorders.

APHON is working steadily to have states recognize and celebrate September 8 as an officially dedicated day. Organizations and the health care teams within them can help these efforts by notifying legislators of the importance of honoring the work in this challenging and rewarding field.

If you are interested in taking action to support these efforts or just honoring a pediatric hematology/ oncology nurse in your life, there’s lots you can do.

  1. Write to your legislators to inform them about the day and propose legislation to have the day officially recognized in your state. You can also invite legislators to a presentation to tell them about this important role in the lives of children and families and health care organizations. Teach them about what you do—in short order they will be amazed.
  2. Use social media for one of its best purposes –spreading good news far and wide. Post on Facebook, chat on Twitter, and post pics on Instagram of you and your fellow nursing team. Use #pediatrichematologyoncologynursesday to bring it all together.
  3. Say thank you to your team or to the pediatric hematology/oncology nurses in your life. Working with children who are fighting these diseases is uplifting, emotional, and essential for the children. Let these nurses know how crucial their work is by spreading a little joy throughout the day and making them feel appreciated.

If you’re a nurse and are interested in exploring this field, contact APHON to learn about some of the requirements and skills you’ll need. A BSN is recommended for pediatric hematology/oncology nurses, and you’ll probably want to work in a general pediatric unit so you can get a feeling for what it’s like working with kids. After gaining some on-the-job experience, getting certification as a Certified Pediatric Hematology Oncology Nurse (CPHON) with the Oncology Nursing Certification Corporation will boost your confidence, your skill set, and your professional credentials.

Happy Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Nurses Day!

 

5 Tips to Turn Around Job Rejections

5 Tips to Turn Around Job Rejections

Starting a job search is exciting. Thinking about a new nursing role or working in a new organization is often energizing and helps get you through the work of looking for a new position. But if you are getting lots of rejections (or even flat-out silence), it’s time to shake things up.

Today’s job market is intense and competitive. If you’re a qualified nurse with a solid background of great work, finding a job shouldn’t be as hard as it sometimes is. If your resumes and inquires are being met with a solid round of no, it’s time to step back and see what you could do better.

1. Take a New Approach

If you’re only sending out resumes, it’s time to do something different. Branch out into professional organizations or networking groups. See if there are any seminars or lectures on LinkedIn or in local organizations. Get yourself out of your routine and meeting new people. Despite today’s incredible technological advances, many job offers come though personal connections not computers.

2. Check that Resume

Sending out the same resume you started with months ago could be a problem. Lots of rejections means it’s time to change it. Your resume isn’t getting replies so check it over for obvious things like spelling errors or grammatical mistakes. But also look at your resume with a critical eye. Should you try easy-to-read bullet points instead of a paragraph? Do you have an outdated phrase like “references available on request” that you should delete? Are you showing rather than telling your experience? Change it up.

3. Prepare for Your Interview

Even if you have an interview with people you know, you have to remember you’re probably up against some highly qualified candidates. Each interview has to be your best interview. There’s no way around that, so you have to be prepared. Know the job, know about the company, be ready to talk about your accomplishments, and ask relevant questions. Be prepared enough so you can listen to your interviewer without just thinking about what you’ll say next. You’ll respond better and will be more relaxed.

4. Do the Follow Up

Follow up after your interview with a handwritten thanks. Email is fine, but in today’s electronic world, many people appreciate a handwritten note.

5. Keep Your Momentum Going

Even after you land a new job, keep growing your professional networks and building your reputation. Careers are always changing and you might decide on a new direction a few years down the road. If you are ready, the next opportunity might seek you out.

Finding Your Balance in Nursing School

Finding Your Balance in Nursing School

Nursing students are a disciplined bunch. They balance coursework in both classrooms and labs, clinicals, a social life, and essential self care in a fast-paced and structured environment.

As a new nursing student, how can you make sure you keep everything moving forward but still take care of yourself? Set good habits and now and get your year off to a good start.

1. Be Open to a New Approach

The most successful students aren’t always the smartest ones. The students who do the best are often the ones who learn how to manage their time best and know what their strengths and weaknesses are. You might have been a top student before, but nursing school is a whole new game. Find the best method of time management for you by experimenting, researching time management approaches, and even taking a seminar (almost all schools offer these). One or two hours of learning a new approach can save your hours and hours of lost time and unnecessary stress.

2. Rethink Getting Help

Nursing students don’t always like to ask for help. But if you don’t ask for help when you’re struggling with an assignment or with an overall course load, you risk falling behind or getting grades that aren’t what you expected. If you’re reluctant to ask for help, look at getting help in a new way. Consider the effort as learning from the best. Ask people to let you in on their secret to success. You are asking to make yourself better, not because you lack skills or knowledge. Assistance doesn’t show your failings, it shows your strength.

3. Learn the Delicate Balance

Anyone in nursing school has the potential to burn out. There is always something more to do, another paper to finish, another exam to study for before your head hits the pillow. If you don’t take time for you, no one is going to do it for you. Now is the time to learn your limits and to respect how caring for yourself makes you a better person. Get enough rest and eat well, but also take time to spend with friends and family. Block off some time for solitude if that’s how you thrive. Be good to yourself now and you’ll reap the benefits throughout your career and your life.

4. Be Proud

You are going to have bad days. Nursing school challenges each and every student—that’s why we have excellent nurses. But it won’t always be fun and your confidence is going to take some serious hits. Throughout it all remember to be proud of yourself. Not everyone can make it as far as you have. Remember that and use that to fuel your fire to become the best nurse you can be. When a bad day knocks you over, just get up and keep going.